Wheat

The ban on futures trading in wheat has been lifted by the government after two years because wheat stocks are in surplus now. Futures trading in rice, tur and urad are still banned. Last month, BC Khatua, chairman Forward Markets Commission, had said that he hoped the ban on all three items would go before the elections and the Elections Commission’s approval had been sought for lifting the ban. The ban was imposed in early 2007 to curb inflation and also ensure sufficient procurement for the buffer stocks. The then finance minister, P Chidambaram had said the ban would be in force until a committee set up under Prof Abhijit Sen submitted its report. Though the Sen Committee argued that there was no correlation between futures trading and inflation and recommended that the ban be lifted, no decision was taken in view of rising food prices and, later, elections. The situation is different now with the rate of inflation running lower than 1% and the granaries overflowing.

Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

User

Steel, Copper, Gold and Aluminium

• Has steel turned around? In late April, John P Surma, chairman & CEO of US Steel, said that “we continue to face an extremely difficult global economic environment. We expect an operating loss in the second quarter as our order book remains at low levels and idled facility carrying costs continue to be incurred.” 

• World refined copper production outpaced demand by about 150,000 tonnes in January, compared with a deficit of about 20,000 tonnes a year earlier, according to International Copper Study Group which anticipates a surplus of 345,000 tonnes in 2009.

• Gold price is struggling to stay above $900 as there is increasing confidence in the world about US and global economic recovery. It is not clear whether that hope would eventually turn out to be misplaced but, right now, nobody is in a mood to play safe.

• The quarterly commodity review of Royal Bank of Scotland paints a bleak picture for aluminium because of the metal's heavy exposure to the transport and construction. Demand is expected to contract by 8% in 2009 while cutbacks in production have not been commensurate.

 

Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

User

Crude Oil

Crude oil production is outpacing demand with the result that millions of barrels of oil are getting added to the inventory. Commercial crude stockpiles as reported by the US Energy Information Administration is at 19-year highs. And yet oil shows no signs of declining below $50. What is the reason for the oil market to defy the laws of demand and supply? Traders are betting on the US economy picking up later this year, though there is still little supportive data. In fact, on 29th April the US Commerce Department reported that gross domestic product shrank 6.1% in the first quarter - the third consecutive quarter of contraction. This is the first time something like this has happened in the last 34 years. But equity markets searched and found a silver lining - an increase in consumer spending. That created a sharp rally in stock indices and, therefore, in crude oil. How long will it last?

Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

online financial advisory
Pathbreakers
Pathbreakers 1 & Pathbreakers 2 contain deep insights, unknown facts and captivating events in the life of 51 top achievers, in their own words.
online financia advisory
The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Online Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
financial magazines online
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
financial magazines in india
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Online Magazine)