More Power to Your Device!
How to select a power-bank that would save your day
 
With speedier processors and more RAM (random access memory), mobile handsets are becoming faster every day. Although the new-generation hardware consumes less power, the battery, which allows the show to go on, is not getting smarter. So, you will find smartphone users searching for a charging point all the time. There is another option too. Use a power-bank to recharge your mobile devices. This comes handy, especially if you travel a lot and do not have time and opportunity to recharge your mobile device. 
 
A power-bank is a portable device that can supply power through USB (universal serial bus) using the stored energy of its built-in batteries. This is similar to an inverter we use at homes and offices as a backup for electricity disruptions. There are thousands of power-banks available in the market selling for a few bucks to some thousand rupees. So how can one choose a right power-bank?
 
First, check the capacity of the mobile battery, which is denoted in milliampere hour (mAh). So, if your device battery shows 2,300mAh, it means that it can hold that much energy charge. In this case, you need to buy a power-bank with minimum 2,300mAh so that it can provide at least one full recharge for your mobile device.
 
Second, check the battery output. It will be denoted on the battery in volts (V). Normally, it is below 5V or/and 2.0A. However, since most new mobile devices have adopted this as a standard, you need not worry too much about it even if your device shows numbers below this. 
 
Now, an important question: How many times do you want to recharge your device/s? If you are planning to recharge a single device, you can either go for a power-bank that would give you one or two full recharges. If you want to recharge more than one device, you need to take the cumulative energy value (total of battery capacity) of these devices and choose accordingly. However, ensure that the power-bank has additional charging cable and connecting points for simultaneous charging of your devices. 
 
Also, while deciding on the capacity of the power-bank, do consider the average health of the battery and conversion rate. Normally, both are considered at about 80% or 0.8 of the battery capacity. A simple formula thus would be:
 
Battery capacity/0.8 (average health)/0.8 (conversion rate) x n (the number of times you need to recharge the device). 
 
From this example, 2,300mAh/ 0.8/0.8 x 2=7,200 (rounded off). So for a device with a battery capacity of 2,300mAh, you need to have a power-bank of about 7,200mAh capacity for two full recharges.
 
Which brand should one buy? This is a complicated question because, until recently, there were hardly any standard brands in power-banks available in India. Although these power-banks are available at a throwaway price, I would not recommend these for two simple reasons. One, the after sales support; and, second, the quality of the power-bank, including the battery itself. Remember, dubious batteries tend to heat a lot and may cause explosion, in rare cases. 
 
While unbranded power-banks are available at cheap rates, known brands, like Sony, Samsung, Lenovo and Asus, command a higher price. The launch of power-bank from Mi has completely changed the scenario and several top brands are now selling power-banks at a reasonable price. For example, a 10,400mAh power-bank from Asus costs about Rs1,699 and Lenovo sells at around Rs2,297. At the same time, Mi sells the same capacity power-bank at just Rs999. Even Ambrane, PowerXcel also sell it at Rs999. 
 
When you buy a branded power-bank, you get peace of mind and some additional features like metal casing, smart-control and charging-discharging chips as well as protection from overcharging and over-discharge. I can say from personal experience that Mi power-bank is one of the best for regular usage. It has ample power (10,400mAh) and comes with an aluminium casing and smart-chips. If you want to buy some other brand, check, if it has similar features. 

 

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    COMMENTS

    Shirish Sadanand Shanbhag

    4 years ago

    Before buying these power banks for the mobile, one has to see their changeability and durability.

    Snapdeal's FreeCharge launches digital wallet
    Utility payments platform FreeCharge on Tuesday launched a digital wallet in partnership with Mumbai-based private lender Yes Bank.
     
    Online e-commerce player Snapdeal had acquired FreeCharge in a deal believed to be worth around Rs.2,800 crore earlier this year and the launch of the new wallet could be seen as a challenge to digital payments player Paytm.
     
    "With the launch of the FreeCharge digital wallet service, we are all set to transform the way people make payments. A secure, easy to use and feature-rich service, the wallet is equipped with state of the art technology and a robust partner network, making it a truly game-changing service that will bring value to consumers and our partners in the ecosystem," said FreeCharge co-founder Kunal Shah.
     
    Freecharge, which has a volume of over 200 million transactions annually, claims that it is set to become the most used wallet within the next six months based on the ecosystem of 8.2 million daily unique users, 4 million monthly engaged hours, 15 million stored cards and a combined with gross merchandise value (GMV) of over $4 billion.
     
    In addition, the company will partner with FINO - a payments bank licensee to build scale and ability to reach even the under-served.
     
    "Our aim is to bring in efficiencies in payments using digital commerce to cater to every consumption need that a user may have. Consumer needs are constantly evolving and we feel it is the right time to launch a trusted and feature-rich digital wallet service," said Snapdeal co-founder Kunal Bahl.
     
    "At Snapdeal we are building an ecosystem that powers billions of digital commerce transactions. With the launch of the FreeCharge Digital Wallet, we will now play an even more intrinsic role in our customers' lives," he added.
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    COMMENTS

    webkitendfullscreen

    4 years ago

    A wallet a day.. God only knows what market they are catering to.. Looks like another expedition to milk some silly investors of their money..

    What Really Are ‘Crossovers’?
    Other than something indefinable, Crossovers have an illusionary ‘presence’
     
    I had a quick look at the new Suzuki S-Cross. This is from the ‘crossover’ segment—whatever that means—because the fact remains that most ‘crossover’ cars in India bear more resemblance to the Hindustan Motors’ Landmaster of the 1950s and early 1960s than anything modern. Higher road clearance, some elements of more space inside (especially in the height department), a reasonably sized cargo area and bigger wheels as well as tyres.
     
    Who, then, are these ‘crossovers’ really aimed at and what do they have which standard hatchbacks also in the sub-four-metre range do not have? Other than something indefinable which does not fool anybody, they have an illusionary ‘presence’, aided by rear-ends designed to look bigger than they really are by addition of elements like wider tail lamps (eating into hatch entry dimensions) and, sometimes, a spare wheel dangling from the rear hatch (will do wonders to the hinges very soon). The addition of stronger side-bars and, in some cases, design changes for side impact protection tend to reduce the horizontal space inside some of these ‘crossovers’. So while they are rated for driver+4, they are actually good for driver+3.
     
    Coming back to the Suzuki S-Cross, I think it will do well, but not because of the exclusive dealerships. It will do well because, to all first appearances, the interiors are brilliant, in many areas matching what one sees in cars from Germany of the same sizes, costing three times as much. And the doors make that solid ‘thunk’ sound too. That, to me, is the most important part. The Suzuki S-Cross feels solid—like the Landmaster used to feel.
     

    Ford Is ‘Different’

    There is good news for drivers looking for vehicles adapted for differently-abled people. First, on the vehicle: Ford India has been working closely with two people I know, Deepa Malik (in Delhi) and Salil Chaturvedi (in Goa), along with some other people all over the country, for supplying specially modified Ford Ecosport cars in Ecoboost engine version with automatic transmission. This sort of cooperation by a manufacturer has been seen after a gap of almost 15-20 years; the last time this was enabled by Maruti Suzuki; then, in between, there has been a hiatus. 
     
    Second, on the registration of a vehicle for differently-abled people as well as getting specific driving licences and the resultant concessions on road tax, excise duty and some other levies, both report good cooperation from the authorities in Delhi as well as in Goa. Here again, the level of cooperation varies from state to state and, often, down to individual Regional Transport Offices (RTOs).
     
    Our differently-abled friends need all the support from the authorities and, towards this, the Delhi RTO has also been running a specific DL-1D series registration number, to remove all confusion for which vehicles are entitled to benefits, including preferential parking. Good work by Ford in India, too, and let’s see some of the other larger manufacturers provide the same level of support too.
     

    French Connection

    Tata first approached the French after World War II for truck technology; but, not making any headway, they settled for Mercedes-Benz which was then recovering from huge War-based losses and damage. Ever since, the French brands appear to have had major problems in establishing themselves in India, despite many efforts.
     
    Even the Duster (of Renault) comes from the Dacia (Romania) stable. Peugeot managed to right royally mess matters up when they allied with Premier Automobiles in the 1980s and never looked as though they could stand up again. Renault is now trying to launch a small car called, of all things, the ‘Kwid’. After the X-Creta and S-Cross jokes doing the rounds, expect a whole new series here, while the car itself will sell only if the price is around Rs3 lakh for a loaded version, from what I hear.
     
    (Veeresh Malik started and sold a couple of companies, is now back to his first love—writing. He is also involved in helping small and midsize family-run businesses re-invent themselves.)
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    Anand Vaidya

    4 years ago

    I have also been wondering about the issue of crossovers. If hatchbacks are the donkeys and true SUVs are horses, crossovers are the mules. :-(

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