Jeevan Saral: LIC Pays Up Rs26.67 Lakh After Chairman is Summoned by Consumer Commission
In a major breakthrough for consumers, the insurance behemoth, Life Insurance Corp of India (LIC), paid up Rs26.67 lakhs, which was the entire money owned to a Jeevan Saral policy holder, when the Maharashtra State Consumer Commission issued a summons to its chairman. 
 
Noted consumer activist and columnist Jehangir Gai fought this case and helped Deepak Rajmal Kothari to get entire maturity value as mentioned on the policy, loyalty bonus and 9% interest. 
 
Mumbai-based Deepak Rajmal Kothari had taken LIC's Jeevan Saral Policy (with profits). The policy mentioned the maturity value as Rs25 lakh, death benefit as Rs3,94,900, and accident benefit as Rs15 lakh. For the 11 year term, Mr Kothari paid total premium of Rs13.65 lakh to LIC. 
 
However, after maturity LIC offered to pay just Rs3.94 lakh plus Rs1.68 lakh as profit or loyalty addition. When Mr Kothari contested, LIC told him that due to typographical error, the maturity and death benefit values had got interchanged in his Jeevan Saral policy. 
 
Thousands of policy holders feel badly cheated by the Jeevan Saral policy and it is an issue that Moneylife Foundation had taken to the Supreme Court. However, consumer courts have proved the better forum because LIC has not succeeded at the national commission and has avoided going back to the Supreme Court. 
 
LIC's Jeevan Saral, which used to be a hot-selling insurance product for agents, until it was withdrawn, is a controversial product. In fact, Jeevan Saral was a traditional product that could make the entire premium (money paid) disappear! This can happen in many policies during surrender or making it ‘paid-up’, but, in the case of Jeevan Saral, it has happened even at policy maturity.
 
Responding to an application filed under right to information (RTI) act, LIC had admitted that during 4 February 2004 to 30 September 2017, total number of policies completed under its Jeevan Saral plan are 4,97,45,861 (4.97 crore).
 
Moneylife Foundation sent a memorandum to IRDAI on 18 August 2018, pointing out that Jeevan Saral (with profit), a traditional policy, has caused senior citizens to lose as much as 65% to 70% loss of the money invested over 10 years.
 
Coming back to the big success at the State Commission, Mr Gai says, "LIC had approached the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC) against the decision from Maharashtra State Consumer Redressal Commission. However, LIC's appeal was dismissed by the NCDRC. Finally, we initiated execution proceedings for holding the chairman and managing director of LIC criminally liable for wilful disobedience of the order. And as soon the summons were served through the police, LIC complied and paid up the entire amount."
 
On 27 July 2015, LIC also issued a circular asking all its offices to retrospectively correct all the Jeevan Saral Policies issued from 2003 onwards. 
 
Mr Gai says the state consumer commission rejected LIC's contention and asked the insurer to pay Rs26.67 lakh with an interest of 9% per annum from the date of maturity of the policy (28 March 2015) and additional Rs50,000 as costs towards litigation and compensation for mental pain and agony. 
 
LIC, however, contested the state commission order before the NCDRC and contended that its Jeevan Saral policy was issued in accordance with table 165.
 
 The counsel for LIC argued that otherwise also, the death claim amount should be much more as compared to the maturity amount. "Actually, in the policy these amounts have been inadvertently interchanged and the complainant is trying to take the advantage of this typing error," the counsel submitted.
 
Prem Narain, presiding member of NCDRC, in an order issued on 11 December 2018, observed that it may be true that the policy is issued under table 165 of the LIC, however, it has been admitted that the table was not supplied along with the policy document and therefore the insured may not be having any inkling that he may not get the amount mentioned in the policy. 
 
"There was no communication made during the policy period by the insurance company mentioning the mistake in the policy document. It is only after the policy has matured and question of payment of maturity amount cropped up, the insurance company has raised the issue of typing error in the policy document. If any typing error is brought to the notice of the other party by any party before the claim becomes due, it can definitely be considered with the consent of both the parties," the NCDRC said.
 
The bench also noted that the typographical mistake cannot be justified on the basis of table 165 of LIC. It says, "It is seen that this table was not part of the policy and was not supplied along with the policy document, therefore, the complainant may not be bound by this table, and rather, the complainant and the insurance company both are bound by the written contract of the policy as mentioned in the policy document."
 
The NCDRC also cited some judgements from the Supreme Court, which clearly stated that the terms and conditions of the policy cannot be changed or interpreted differently by any forum and particularly when there is no obvious reason for accepting the alleged typographical error in the policy.
 
Mr Gai says, after the NCDRC order, LIC constituted a high power committee to decide on what ought to be done. "We also waited for over six months to see if LIC would approach the Supreme Court, but it did not file any special leave petition (SLP). Also there was no communication regarding the high power committee. This is when we decided to initiate execution proceedings under section 27 of the Act, holding the LIC's chairman and MD criminally liable for wilful disobedience of the NCDRC order."
 
"As soon the summons were served through the police, LIC complied and paid up the entire amount (to Mr Kothari)," Mr Gai added.
 
As Moneylife reported, following a public interest litigation (PIL) filed by Moneylife Foundation in the Supreme Court, LIC on 9 July 2019 issued a circular asking all its offices to take on a war footing , a verification drive for correcting "printing" mistakes in maturity sum assured (MSA) under its Jeevan Saral policy. 
 
LIC says in the circular that its software development centre (SDC) has devised a program to identity Jeevan Saral policy bonds wherever printing mistake had occurred in matured sum assured-MSA. "The program has been designed to extract all Jeevan Saral policies of the division, with status 21 (in force) and 31 (reduced paid up) where MSA is less than death sum assured (DSA). The initial step is to run extraction option. This one time job is to be done immediately, after office hours," the circular says. (Read: Jeevan Saral: LIC Wants to Know How Many Policies Are Flawed. Asks Officers to Finish the Task Before 31st July)
 
As highlighted by Moneylife, LIC's Jeevan Saral, which used to be a hot-selling insurance product for agents, until it was withdrawn, is a controversial product. In fact, Jeevan Saral was a traditional product that could make your premium (money paid) disappear! This can happen in many policies during surrender or making it ‘paid-up’, but, in the case of Jeevan Saral, it has happened even at policy maturity. (Read: Life Insurance: LIC Jeevan Saral: A Toxic Product)
 
NOTE for AGGRIVED POLICY HOLDERS of LIC JEEVAN SARAL
 
 
Many LIC consumers have written to us asking about the next course of action. The big victory secured by Jehangir Gai, a well-known consumer activist who appears before the State and National Consumer Commissions, seems the best option for investors and Jeevan Saral policy holders. 
 
Those who want to seek Mr Gai’s help on a professional basis can write to [email protected] for his contact details. Moneylife Foundation is also exploring the option of joining the petition and working to create a class- action. 
 
However, as of now, based on the success in the earlier case, consumers would be best guided if they seek professional help. 
 
About Mr Jehangir Gai
 
Mr Gai has been actively associated with various consumer organizations since 1984-85 and has been fighting for consumer causes even before the Consumer Protection Act was passed. 
 
He has appeared before the district, state and national consumer commission on numerous occasions. 
 
He has also filed several Writ Petitions in the Bombay High Court regarding the problems faced litigants in consumer courts as well as the non-functional State Consumer Protection Council with positive results.
 
In recognition of his contribution to the consumer movement, he was awarded the Government of India's National Youth Award for Consumer Protection 1993.   
  • Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

    User 

    COMMENTS

    Sitaram Goyal

    6 months ago

    It’s greatest helps to sufferers,thanks to moneylife

    Anil Patel

    6 months ago

    I feel better now, its a positive msg for all costumers who taken j.saral....most agents are also facing belonging this problem, how to face with our custs with this matter....thxs to all them, who were involved in this case....they fought for ordinary peoples.....

    Anil Kumar

    6 months ago

    Great work Moneylife. Thank you.

    SAN-Geetha Raj

    6 months ago

    Even the ombudsman judgement is sold out to insurance agencies.I was shocked to see the rewards by ombudsman based on white lies even when customers had submitted documentation proof .The ombudsman was able to see non existent signatures and KYC even when it did not exist on paper of customers copy .who will bell ombudsman? If courts are only option why have ombudsman?

    Newme

    6 months ago

    Commendable work ML.

    Satish Mathew

    6 months ago

    I appreciate monylife's efforts and your organisation is the last refuge for ordinary people. Congrats.👍

    m.prabhu.shankar

    6 months ago

    May God Bless Mr Jehangir Gai with Good Health and Long and Successful Life

    BR

    6 months ago

    Thank you Moneylife. I request that the CauseTitle, Case no. ,nmaes of Court, Parties, Lawyers &Judges are given in future as it is useful to search for case details in website or in courts. Instead of asking parties in or lawyer for the case, as it is not easy to contact them & they may not respond.

    Sandeep More

    6 months ago

    We remain indebted to Money Life and Mr Gai for their valuable assistance in getting us justice and saving us from getting defrauded.

    gcmbinty

    6 months ago

    Great work done, both by Moneylife Foundation and Jehangir Gai. Congratulations

    Balaji Birajdar

    6 months ago

    Buy a term policy worth 10 to 20 thousand and get covered for 50 laks to 1 crore a year. Rest , invest in NPS according to your capacity and get assured pension from the govt. Do not go for LIC.... Never ever LIC

    REPLY

    Krishna Dhule

    In Reply to Balaji Birajdar 6 months ago

    Hi Mr balaji , there are certain policies of Lic which gives more then NPS like jeevan shree , akshaya1, and many which given and still giving return around 10-13% yearly , just for one bad policy you cannot say never to Lic , every person has different requirements , may be your requirements not sutaible to Lic .
    Lic is good and strongest company of India

    Emrose Chellappan

    In Reply to Krishna Dhule 6 months ago

    Hi mr.Krishna Dhule you yourself telling jeevan saral is bad pl
    olicy . nobody claiming Lic money the policy holder's paid up money of senior citizens is in question

    Arvind V

    In Reply to Krishna Dhule 6 months ago

    LIC was a good & strong company, in the past.

    After being made to invest in toxic assets of ILFS & IDBI, it's no longer strong/ good.

    It's a warning note for policy holders', when their money is used for bailing out zombie companies.

    Niranjan Mushahary

    In Reply to Krishna Dhule 6 months ago

    No more LIC... or after 10 years they will say typo error..

    Adhikrao Mane

    In Reply to Krishna Dhule 6 months ago

    Purpose of saving in insurance products is long term security say for 20-30 years. For those who are not competent enough to monitor growth regularly, savings through insurance is good option. Obviously as security of funds is top priority than returns it gives much less returns than other products, and rightly so. To avoid uncomfortable questions from prospects about low returns agents tends to show more returns by juggalary of words. But now insurance companies now indulging in this type of tactics to garner premium to retain market share. Lic is in the forefront to misled prospects, who still trust Lic. Lic's ill informed field staff and ill informed officers instead of preparing themselves for competition and more aware people are relying on lies to sell the products, for so many years now. In today's market conditions no traditional insurance product will give more than 5% of returns. All others will be lies or unsustainable.

    Motor Insurance Monopoly: Toyota Tsusho lnsurance Broker Also Gets Away with Just Rs3 Crore Penalty Despite Serious Violations of MISP
    The Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI) has levied a penalty of just Rs3 crore on Toyota Tsusho lnsurance Broker India Pvt Ltd (TTIBIL) for serious violations of its guidelines on Motor Insurance Service Provider (MISP). The order from the regulator, however,  follows similar pattern where IRDAI has given leeway to two largest insurance brokers, Maruti lnsurance Brokers Pvt Ltd (MIBL) and Hero Insurance Brokers Pvt Ltd (HIBIL) by levying a penalty of just Rs3 crore and Rs2.18 crore, respectively, on the brokers. (Read: Has Motor Insurance Become Monopoly of Automakers? IRDAI Allows Leeway to Maruti and Hero Insurance Brokers with Small Penalty for Serious Violations)
     
    Toyota Tsusho lnsurance Broker or TTIBIL has sold about 7.06 lakh motor insurance policies to 
    3.16 lakh Toyota car owners and 3.90 lakh Yamaha owners.
     
    In an order issued on 8 January 2020, Sujay Banarji, member for distribution at IRDAI, says, "TTIBIL is a significant broker in the selling and distribution of motor insurance in the country. It is part of the Toyota Kirloskar Motor Pvt Ltd (TKM) having strong presence in motor vehicle segment. By not getting the best terms, benefits, coverages for the customer TTIBIL has not conducted its dealing with clients with utmost good faith and integrity, nor has it acted with care and diligence thereby violating the conduct in matters relating to clients relationship."
     
    IRDAI says it had received complaints from policyholders, general lnsurance agents association and insurers about apparent conflict of interest in the role of TTIBIL in forcing motor customers to buy insurance for the insurers on their panel. The complainants also alleged that TTIBIL has kept the uniform premium rates for same motor vehicles from all its seven insurers and been discriminating between insurance policyholder, who has bought motor insurance from that motor dealer as against who has not bought from them.
     
    Further, TTIBIL was servicing and repairing of motor vehicles under the insurance policies sold by it, high claims ratio under the MISP channel, extra payments made to MISP by insurers, and disparity of treatment to agents, the complaints received by IRDAI had said.
     
    According to IRDAI, the MISP entered into an agreement with TKM, the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) through the dealer expectation standards India (DESI) 2019, a dealer evaluation programme that gives the methodology of rewarding dealer for retaining insurance policies issued through him. The marks under the programme are linked to the rewards and incentives, which the dealer gets from the OEM. By rewarding dealer for retaining insurance policies issued through him, the principal officer (PO) of TTIBIL has contradicted his affirmations in the notorised affidavit, it added.
     
    IRDAI says, "By imposing the above restrictions, the customer or prospect is denied his rights and options to buy or renew his motor insurance policy from any insurance intermediary and curtails the choice of prospective policyholder. The MISP actions are therefore prejudicial to the interest of the policyholder and leads to unfair trade practices TTIBIL being the sponsor of the MISP, is responsible for all omissions and commissions of MISP. It has therefore violated provisions such as inducing the customer and indulging in unfair business practice; forcing the MISP to make customers buy motor insurance policies from them and restricts choice of policyholder and prejudicial to the interest of the policyholder and leading to unfair trade practices."
     
    In its submission, the insurance broker stated that it has appointed seven general insurers out of 25 on its panel for selling motor insurance policies. "The customer has the ultimate choice to opt from insurance from any channel or insurer of his choice. Around 3.16 lakh Toyota car owners out of 10 lakh Toyota cars sold have taken insurance through their retail car insurance. Similarly, out of 35 lakh plus Yamaha vehicles around 3.90 lakh Yamaha owners have taken insurance through their programme," it added.
     
    TTIBIL admitted that as many as 7.06 lakh customers had bought motor insurance policies through its panel. 
     
    IRDA, however, observed that "By having allocation of marks for insurance penetration in the DESI 2019 makes the MISP force customers or prospects buy motor insurance policies from them. TTIBIL being the sponsor of the MISP and being responsible for all omissions and commissions of MISP has therefore, violated provisions of MISP guidelines."
     
    Here is the orders issued by IRDAI against Toyota Tsusho lnsurance Broker India Pvt Ltd (TTIBIL)...
     
  • Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

    User 

    COMMENTS

    raghu reddy

    6 months ago

    I have also taken policy. Wat about our fate.

    Merging Insurance Companies: Yet Another Air India in the Making?
    If you do not know where you are going, it does not matter which road you take. Well, this is not exactly what the cat said to Alice in the famous parable, but it captures succinctly the conundrum currently surrounding the merger of general insurance companies in the public sector, namely, Oriental Insurance (Oriental), National Insurance (National) and United India Insurance (UI).

    The department of financial services has now taken the first step towards going down the rabbit hole by announcing that two of these, namely, National and UI, will be merged with Oriental by 31 March 2020. The merged entity will start functioning with effect from 1 April 2020 with its head office in Delhi.
     
    According to rough estimates, the capital infusion needed is at least Rs2,000 crore-Rs3,000 crore in each of the companies, and the total collective requirement is close to Rs12,000 crore-Rs13,000 crore. What is perhaps left unasked is: Will this merger, accompanied by the fund infusion, act as a silver bullet, that is, will it make the merged entity viable both in terms of capital adequacy and the return on investment to the principal shareholder, the Indian taxpayer?
     
    The question that arises while making such an open-ended commitment of taxpayers’ money is: whether there has been a robust and transparent debate to evaluate the decision, the process and the likely outcomes? 
     
    Let us start by asking a basic question—what is the objective behind the proposal? Is it to cut costs? Is it to create synergies? Is it to provide for a government owned counterweight to the private sector in the general insurance space, something like the Life Insurance Corporation (LIC) in the life insurance space? The government probably assumes that consolidation will lead to cost rationalisation, marketing synergy, avoidance of wasteful competition and better leveraging of the balance sheet, thereby restoring the profitability of the merged businesses.
     
    The one likely objective—cost cutting - seems reasonably straightforward at first sight and possibly that is what is driving this whole exercise. Merging the companies will eliminate the wasteful expense of these three companies having an office each in the same locality, sometimes in the same building, thus saving on rent and other fixed costs. This will also eliminate the parallel pyramids of staff and officers in the three companies.
     
    However, if the government promises that jobs will be protected, and in the current scenario this is a given, then any attrition of manpower will only happen gradually, by way retirement. The financial strain of a realistic voluntary retirement scheme (VRS) may break the balance sheets of these companies.
     
    The second objective might be to create synergy. This is easier said than done.
     
    Integrating the information technology (IT) systems or migrating to a standardised one will be a logistical and financial nightmare. Business operations of these companies will be paralysed while integration is taking place. Although outwardly similar, these three companies have different cultures and practices and integrating them will be a long and painful grind. Even if the elusive goal of synergy is somehow accomplished, what would it achieve? If the market doesn’t really need you, synergy of any kind is a false objective.
     
    Creating a counterweight to private sector?  One large company, New India Assurance, already exists. This is a listed entity and perhaps this factor gets in the way of integrating the four public sector insurance companies, instead of the three unlisted ones, which would have been the most sensible course to take. Yet another giant public sector insurer is unlikely to stand on its own in the market, given the strong presence of private sector companies in almost all nooks and corners of the country. The only thing that is bound to happen is that the business of the three public sector companies will move to the private sector or to New India while the transition is taking place. By the time the merger is fully accomplished, the merged company would have turned into an insignificant entity, presumably a dumping place for unwanted business or to administer government-sponsored schemes.
     
    Here it may be pertinent to examine the seemingly parallel merger of public sector banks. While the drivers may be similar, the operational consequences are different. Bank customers are unlikely to move their banking relationships in a hurry—be it savings or current accounts, or loans.  Juxtapose this with the fact that insurance policies are generally 12-month contracts.  Customers always do forum shopping at the time of renewal. There is every incentive to move one’s policy to another insurer either for a lower premium or for better service. The other parallel that might be drawn is the merger of Mahanagar Telephone Nigam Ltd (MTNL) and Bharat Sanchar Nigam ltd (BSNL). This is a false analogy simply because while ownership of telecommunication assets can be justified as a strategic imperative for the government, there are no such imperatives as regards the non-life insurance space. In any case, hopefully, the one listed insurer, New India, can serve the purpose, if any, behind government presence in the market.
     
    Will the merged entity generate returns for the government? A cursory look at the financial performance of each of these three companies will provide the answer—none of them have made an underwriting profit for the past couple of decades and some of these companies have actually incurred losses even after considering the investment income. The harsh fact is that insurance financial statements, given the reporting standards currently prevalent in our country, are notoriously opaque. The real state of their financials might be far more alarming than the published figures. 
     
    Would the merged entity provide a choice to the insuring public? Given that there are already 27 companies in the market, competing for a customer base, the argument of offering customer choice sounds preposterous. 
     
    Will the merged entity have a strategic rationale for its existence? Is there a gap in the market which a second public sector insurer will fulfil or will it end up as a drag on the other remaining public sector company, New India? It is obvious that the merged entity will act as a direct competitor to New India rather than to other private sector insurance companies. 
     
    The reality is that non-life market is overcrowded and fiercely competitive. Regardless of the projected growth of the economy, the market is unlikely to make room for a new insurer. Make no mistake, the merged entity will be a new entrant given that consumer loyalty is rather flaky. Share of the non-life premium in the gross domestic product (GDP) has barely moved over the years, and with the economy being near-stagnant now, the size of the pie is unlikely to grow at the same pace as was the case in the past couple of decades. The size of the pie and its constituents are probably the subject matter for another article.
     
    Is the merger a prelude to eventual disinvestment? Drawing a parallel with Air India privatisation is possibly not very apt. Air India has international flying rights and airport slots which make it attractive to a potential investor. It is difficult to imagine why any eventual disinvestment or listing of the merged entity will attract any interest from private investors. The best course for the government would be to put the three companies into ‘run-off’ and give a golden handshake to its employees. This is a common practice in all insurance markets where a general insurance company is in terminal decline and is not an attractive proposition for merger or acquisition.
     
    If the merger exercise goes ahead in its present shape and form, the owners, i.e., the government, will have 'another fine mess' on its hands sooner rather than later.
     
    The principal reason is that there is no business case or other strategic rationale for the merger. Our experience shows that government ownership simply does not allow the management to run a business like a business.  And it is our money which will be spent time and again.
     
    The additional capitalisation requirement mentioned in the earlier part of this article is merely the starting point; it is very likely that, given the total absence of a business case for the existence of the merged entity, periodic top-ups become inevitable. This is where one worries about 'another Air India' inasmuch as this will amount to throwing good money down the rabbit hole.
     
    (Shrirang Samant has worked in senior leadership roles in the General Insurance Industry, both in public and private sectors, in India and abroad. He has been privy to the transition of this industry from public to private sector in the country and was the founding CEO of a multinational insurance joint venture- JV in India.) 
  • Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

    User 

    COMMENTS

    B. Yerram Raju

    6 months ago

    The economy needs more than mergers. Stop the merger mania for the present.

    chandan

    6 months ago

    Very well explained and approaching the practical aspects.

    Mahesh Kalkar

    6 months ago

    Very well articulated. Unfortunately, who listens in the policy making corridors? No one. Travesty of so called running the country!

    VINAY PRABHAKAR

    6 months ago

    Couldn't find the link of the announcement by Dept of Financial services stating that United India and National insurance will be merged into Oriental insurance...Link Please???

    Meenal Mamdani

    6 months ago

    Excellent article that explains the possible govt rationale for the proposed merger and the clear explanation why such a merger is unlikely to be successful.
    Govt is trying to avoid adding another piece of bad news to the already gloomy picture of the economy.
    It is clear from this article that the govt is trying to avoid short term pain but letting itself in for a long term headache.
    As for Godbole's concern about the workers, while admirable, shows why people pay enormous sums of money to get into a govt entity. It is a secure appointment for life, something that is unlikely in any private enterprise.

    Praveen Godbole

    6 months ago

    As an alternative to merger of three general insurance companies, author suggests ...."to put the three companies into ‘run-off’ and give a golden handshake to its employees". Really? Has anything like this been tried in Indian insurance market before? After relatively long lull, big recruitment exercises were carried out in these companies in recent years. What will happen to the young workforce which is not even 30?
    Considering the available options, merger and consolidation seems to be the best approach. Only that it needs to be handled carefully.

    Ramesh Poapt

    6 months ago

    a patient suffering from severe cough/cold goes to doctor. Dr advises to take ice cubes every hour. Patience says I will get typhoid by that. Dr says exactly. I m expert in only that!

    REPLY

    chandan

    In Reply to Ramesh Poapt 6 months ago

    Ha ha...Good sense of humor

    Nihanth

    6 months ago

    agree on most of the points but there is a huge retirement spree in the coming 2-3 years nearly 4000 employees in United India Insurance Co are retiring the figures will be more or less the same in other two companies as well so there will be no need of a vrs and also what's the difficulty in merging a listed company (new india assurance) in this case and unlisted company when government is the major shareholder in both the entities surely it can't be harder than merging psbs....

    We are listening!

    Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
      Loading...
    Close

    To continue


    Please
    Sign Up or Sign In
    with

    Email
    Close

    To continue


    Please
    Sign Up or Sign In
    with

    Email

    BUY NOW

    online financial advisory
    Pathbreakers
    Pathbreakers 1 & Pathbreakers 2 contain deep insights, unknown facts and captivating events in the life of 51 top achievers, in their own words.
    online financia advisory
    The Scam
    24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
    Moneylife Online Magazine
    Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
    financial magazines online
    Stockletters in 3 Flavours
    Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
    financial magazines in india
    MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
    (Includes Moneylife Online Magazine)
    FREE: Your Complete Family Record Book
    Keep all the Personal and Financial Details of You & Your Family. In One Place So That`s Its Easy for Anyone to Find Anytime
    We promise not to share your email id with anyone