Eliminate Carbs, Not Saturated Fats, from Your Diet To Lower Cholesterol
People with high cholesterol levels have traditionally been advised to minimise their consumption of saturated fats to reduce risk of heart disease. But now, disputing these traditionally prescribed dietary changes, a new study has found no evidence to actually support these claims. 
 
An international team of experts on heart disease and diet, including five cardiologists, reviewed the dietary guidelines for people with familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic disorder that causes people to have cholesterol levels two to four times higher than an average person. Their findings have been collated and published in the scientific journal BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine
 
For decades, organisations, including the American Heart Association, have suggested that people with hypercholesterolemia should avoid eating food from animal sources, such as meat, eggs and cheese, and also tropical oils. High cholesterol levels can mean fatty deposits in blood vessels which can eventually grow making it difficult for enough blood to flow through the arteries. Often, these deposits can break suddenly and form a clot that causes a heart attack or stroke. 
 
Surprisingly, the researchers behind the new report have found no advantageous changes in high-cholesterol patients who abstained from saturated fats rich foods like meat, eggs, and cheese—in contradiction with conventional wisdom. Instead, they recommend following a low-carb diet for any person with increased risk of heart disease, such as those who are overweight, hypertensive and diabetic. 
 
“For the past 80 years, people with familial hypercholesterolemia have been told to lower their cholesterol with a low saturated fat diet. Our study showed that a more ‘heart healthy’ diet is one low in sugar, not saturated fat,” said lead author Prof David Diamond, a heart disease researcher at the University of South Florida.
 
The findings from this study are also consistent with another research paper recently published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology which provided strong evidence that food which raises blood sugar, such as bread, potatoes and sweets, should be minimised, rather than tropical oils and animal-based food.
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    COMMENTS

    Ramesh Popat

    7 days ago

    so, old saying favoring milk and ghee was right perhaps!
    (cow milk/ghee better for sure! and further if cream is
    removed after boiling milk-much better! we may have superb
    home made ghee from it)

    Newme

    1 week ago

    In the last decade we have seen drastic increase in heart problems even for people who do not eat heavy foods and lead relatively healthy lifestyle. It is alleged that refined Sunflower oil people consume is actually an oil extracted from petroleum refineries. One reason given is while the Sunflower area under cultivation has reduced but the Sunflower oil production has increased.
    Common man has neither time or energy to investigate this inference.

    Mumbai may be heading to herd immunity: Experts' report
    In an encouraging development, an experts' report late on Tuesday pointed to Mumbai heading towards 'herd immunity' as the city recorded the lowest number of cases—700—in the past three months on Tuesday, officials said.
     
    The ser-survey report prepared by the NITI Aayog, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research and BrihanMumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) indicates that Mumbai, which currently has a little more than 21,000 active cases, could be inching towards herd immunity.
     
    The recovery rate in Mumbai is 73 per cent while the doubling rate has climbed to 69 days.
     
    So far, BMC has done over 4.85 lakh tests and the overall growth from July 20 to July 26 is 1.03 per cent.
     
    "The first round report of Sero Surveillance for Covid-19 infection in Mumbai indicates that 57 per cent of slum population and 16 per cent of non-slum population have developed antibodies. Infection fatality rate is very low. Are we closer to herd immunity?" BMC's Additional Municipal Commissioner Ashwini Bhide tweeted late on Tuesday.
     
    A BMC statement later said: "The results will be valuable to learn more about herd immunity. Although it is still unclear what level of prevalence leads to herd immunity, findings indicate at least in slums this could be attained sooner or later, if the immunity exists and persists in a significant proportion of the population."
     
    About 57 per cent respondents in Mumbai slums had been exposed to Covid-19, as opposed to 16 per cent in non-slum areas, showed the sero-survey report. Sero-prevalence was marginally higher in women than men, showed the study.
     
    The first round of the study was conducted on 6,936 people from three wards -- R-North, M-West and F-North. Higher sero-prevalence in slums could be possible due to population density and shared common facilities -- toilets, water points etc. -- said the study.
     
    Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
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    COMMENTS

    yerramr

    6 days ago

    This is certainly good news, not only for Mumbai but for the whole country and all the major cities. Once herd immunity is developed, opened up economy will move fast towards recovery of growth.

    Ramesh Popat

    7 days ago

    Good news! there may be many more areas like this.

    How to Understand COVID-19 Numbers
    Viewed in isolation or presented without context, coronavirus numbers don’t always give an accurate picture of how the pandemic is being handled. Here, ProPublica journalists Caroline Chen and Ash Ngu offer insight on how to navigate the figures.
     
    It’s the middle of the summer, and the coronavirus has not gone away.
     
    When the pandemic first began, some had hoped that there’d be a lull during the summer, with the heat knocking the virus into submission, but it has continued its march across America, with outbreaks flaring across the southern and southwestern states. Arguments have also become part of the daily discourse, with people debating over case counts and death tolls, how the trends should be interpreted and whether the reported numbers can even be trusted.
     
    I’ve watched so many reporters, both at ProPublica and at other outlets, do their best to debunk myths, demystify confusing trends and answer the public’s questions. It is, frankly, exhausting, especially when the same arguments keep coming up again and again. I’m also concerned to see not just laypeople, but local and national leaders, using data out of context to justify their own narratives. At the same time, I see members of the public who are sincerely confused, trying to find a way through all the numbers and charts being thrown around, asking: “How concerned should I be right now? How bad are things, really?”
     
    So I wanted to step back and, with my colleague Ash Ngu, walk you through some common coronavirus metrics and explain how to interpret them. I hope this will leave you better equipped to assess claims with appropriate skepticism, filter out the garbage and find the real signal amid the noise.
     
    Case Counts Won’t Give You the Full Picture
     
    The first thing I asked experts was: What metric would you recommend I track if I wanted to understand what was going on in my state?
     
    Both Matthew Fox, professor of epidemiology and global health at Boston University, and Youyang Gu, a data scientist best known for his COVID-19 prediction models, advised looking at three measurements together: number of cases, case positivity rates and number of deaths.
     
    “Cases going up or down tells you a fair bit about what’s going on at the moment in terms of transmission of the virus — but it’s only valid if we’re testing enough people,” Fox said.
     
    When there aren’t enough tests available, as was the case in New York in March, the number of cases reported will be an undercount, perhaps by a lot.
     
    That’s where case positivity rates come in: that measures the percentage of total tests conducted that are coming back positive. It helps you get a sense of how much testing is being done overall in a region.
     
    “WHO guidelines say we want that to be below 5%,” Fox noted. When a positivity rate is higher, epidemiologists start worrying that means only sicker people have access to tests and a city or region is missing mild or asymptomatic cases. When almost all of the tests come back negative, on the other hand, it’s a good indicator that a locality has enough tests available for everyone who wants one, and public health officials have an accurate picture of all the infections, Fox said.
     
    He gave the example of Massachusetts, where he lives. Currently, daily positive case counts have been steadily falling for the past three months. “The positivity rate is now below 2%, so I feel confident in saying that we know what’s going on, and it’s not that we’re not doing enough testing and we’re missing a lot of positive cases.”
     
    On the flip side, any state where the positivity rate is higher than 10% is “really going to worry me,” Fox said. “That tells me that we’re probably missing a fair number of cases, and you’re not doing enough testing to see what’s going on.”
     
    Fox noted that some states in the Sun Belt, such as Arizona and Florida, have recently had very high positivity rates, even above 20%. “That means we don’t have full visibility.”
     
    (Graphics by Ash Ngu)
     
    Deaths are also an important metric, because this is what most people care about when it comes to the virus’s ultimate impact, Gu said. “There are instances where you have clusters of infections but they’re mostly in young people, so you see a spike in cases, but not in deaths, because they’re all low-risk individuals — but if they were all to transmit it to their parents or older, high-risk individuals, or if the virus started going around long-term care homes, that’d be a high cause for concern.”
     
    Computational epidemiologist Maimuna Majumder also recommends tracking deaths. Even though deaths lag behind new cases, typically by three weeks to a month, “it’s a good indicator for just how serious of a burden this pandemic is causing, not only on our health care system, but also on the general public’s mental health and well-being.”
     
    Hospitalization data is another way to track the impact of the pandemic that has less of a lag than reported deaths. After the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services told hospitals this month to stop reporting data to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and report directly to HHS instead, some of these numbers have become more erratic, according to The Covid Tracking Project. Currently, all the states except for Hawaii and Kansas are reporting COVID-19 hospitalization data. Continue Reading
     
     
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