Diagnosed with cancer? Don't take it lying down
New Delhi : Being diagnosed with cancer at a prime age with flying dreams and a family to look after can be earth-shattering for most people. But when it comes to facing the stark reality, whom does one blame for the slow but certain decay of cells and tissues in your body.
 
At a time when health practitioners globally are becoming certain they can cure any form of cancer (depending on the stage of discovery), the real fight for cancer-stricken people is to choose between two realities: Embrace the situation with humility and prepare themselves for the long-drawn medical procedures or give up and let it progress.
 
"If a person is unfortunate to get cancer, the most important thing is to maintain a positive attitude. Further, he or she should identify people from family or friends who will be standing with him or her throughout the procedures," Dr. Ajit Saxena, consultant urologist and andrologist at the Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals in the capital, told IANS.
 
"Next is to search for the best oncologist for the particular cancer treatment, depending on the organ affected. Whatever be the situation, it is best to consider things rationally, apply the mind to find the best treatment available and fight it out," Dr Saxena said.
 
The next stage is to connect with cancer support groups online or offline to prepare yourself for the battle ahead.
 
"Life is priceless and there should be no option to give it up. Help in one form or the other can be offered to all patients at any stage of cancer. We may enable them to meet realistic goals and lead a better quality of life given the situation they are faced with," Dr. Harit Chaturvedi, chairman, Max Institute of Oncology at Max Hospitals, emphasised.
 
Fully aware that you have been diagnosed with cancer, do not just go on blaming your fate. While more and more triggers are becoming increasingly known, it is still difficult to pin point one cause for any particular cancer.
 
Some of the known associated factors, however, are unhealthy lifestyle, tobacco and alcohol consumption, viral infections, family history and, of course, ageing.
 
"It is a consequence of interplay of multiple factors such as bad habits, bad lifestyle, ageing, obesity, environmental and genetic mutations," notes Dr Sanjay Dudhat, head of surgical oncology from Nanavati Super Specialty Hospital in Mumbai.
 
If a patient is diagnosed with cancer, the first thing he or she requires is counselling. Proper disclosure of diagnosis, correcting patients' myths about cancer and explaining the proper treatment strategies to the patient and relatives result in better acceptance and also reduces mental trauma.
 
"Proper treatment along with boosting the morale of the patient will get better results. So do not ever give up and fight cancer regardless," Dr Dudhat adds.
 
For those who are healthy and the disease does not run in the family, making simple changes can result in saying goodbye to cancer.
 
"Screening! Sceening! Sreening! Early diagnosis of any cancer makes all the difference between life and death," says Dr Saxena, also a pioneer in robotic surgery (urology).
 
"In the case of prostate cancer, a simple blood test can detect early stages. Whole body scan can pick up early cancer stages. This is important particularly in cases where there is a family history of cancer," he advises.
 
According to Dr Sidarth Sahni from department of surgical oncology at Indraprastha Apollo, woman should be aware of complications in the breast.
 
"Every woman, irrespective of family history, needs to have a mammogram done every year after age 40 as breast cancer is the fastest growing disease in women in India," he told IANS.
 
In middle age, avoid smoking and tobacco, cut alcohol consumption, hit the gym or join a neighbourhood yoga and meditation session followed by brisk walk. And do not forget adding fruits and vegetables to your grocery list.
 
Maintain healthy weight and be physically active, get immunised against Hepatitis B and HPV viruses, have safe and protected sex and opt for regular health check ups, are some of the other steps doctors suggest.
 
For those diagnosed with cancer, reading "Being Mortal" helps. It's a highly-acclaimed book by Dr Atul Gawande, a New York-based surgeon that carries several moving stories about his family, friends and patients describing how someone could better live with age-related or otherwise serious illnesses.
 
"Arriving at an acceptance of one's mortality and a clear understanding of the limits and the possibilities of medicine is a process, not an epiphany," he writes.
 
Above all, wear a positive attitude. If cancer has entered your life, give it a tough competition with smile, grit and determination.
 
"I strongly believe that life is not about waiting for the storm to pass but about learning how to dance in the rain," Dr Chaturvedi of Max Institute says.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
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    COMMENTS

    Ramesh Poapt

    4 years ago

    This article and all the articles by Dr Hegde are excellent!!
    Please..........publish such articles....even it has not many comments!

    Facebook app draining excess battery from your phone
    London : Social media giant Facebook's official mobile app is slowing Android smartphones by 15 percent and is consuming excess battery power, a media report said on Tuesday.
     
    The hugely-successful smartphone app has been hit with controversy this week after a number of reports showed it drained battery life and slowed phones, express.co.uk reported Monday.
     
    Facebook fans discussed the impact of the app on Reddit, with one user publishing a chart to show the drain caused by the Android app, the report said.
     
    It was found during the test that involved launching 15 popular apps in succession. Each app loaded significantly faster when Facebook was not installed on the same smartphone.
     
    "So yeah, I think that settles it for me... I am joining the browser-app camp for now," a Reddit user posted.
     
    "Messenger seems to be worse than FB. Both apps individually caused a slow-down of roughly five percent in the test," the user claimed.
     
    Another user said that, "I think it had just become so bloated with features, things they kept adding to the main site that people wanted in the mobile apps also," adding, "Combine this with Android's tendency to let apps run wild in the background."
     
    Last year, some iPhone users reported a similar problem saying the app began draining almost 40 percent of the battery.
     
    Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
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    How one sugary drink daily boosts India's death rate
    Sugar-sweetened beverages account for every one in 200 deaths caused by India’s rising tide of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity, according to a 2015 study.
     
    “Over 80 percent of those deaths happen because sugary drinks are associated with weight gain and diabetes,” Dariush Mozaffarian, study co-author and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition, Tufts University in the US, told IndiaSpend. Another 15 percent of those deaths occur because sugar-sweetened beverages are an established cause of heart disease, said Mozaffarian.
     
    Heart disease and diabetes have reached epidemic levels in India, as IndiaSpend has reported, together responsible for 28 percent of all deaths.
     
    Over the last decade, obesity has more than doubled among men, and risen one-and-a-half times among women, according to the latest National Family Health Survey.
     
    One or two sugary drinks a day - what you might consider “moderate” consumption, and hence safe - are enough to cause trouble, according to scientific evidence.
     
    People consuming one to two servings a day are at 26 percent greater risk of developing type-2 diabetes than those consuming no sugar-sweetened beverage or less than a serving a month.
     
    Women consuming two or more sugary drinks a day had a 35 percent greater risk of developing coronary heart disease than infrequent consumers, according to this study. Men who averaged a can of a sugary beverage per day had a 20 percent higher risk of having a heart attack or dying from a heart attack compared to men who rarely consumed sugary drinks.
     
    How tax hikes cut demand: The Mexican experience
     
    India’s battle with excess weight and lifestyle diseases has turned the focus on high-calorie foods and beverages, and in turn, on taxation - a tool with the potential to lower consumption.
     
    Higher taxes increase prices, which in turn lower demand. It’s a formula that has worked in Mexico.
     
    A new 10 percent tax on soft drinks, introduced in January 2014 with the objective of lowering consumption 10-12 percent, actually lowered overall consumption by 12 percent, or 4.2 litres per person by December, a new Mexican study showed. Poorer households witnessed a 17 percent decline in consumption.
     
    A 20 percent tax on sugar-sweetened beverages would cut India’s excess weight and obesity prevalence by three percent over a decade - and the cases of type-2 diabetes by 1.6% at current consumption growth rates - a 2014 study estimated.
     
    That implies India would have 11.2 million fewer cases of obesity and 400,000 fewer cases of type-2 diabetes.
     
    If soft drink consumption were to rise further - as it likely will, in line with the annual average growth of 13 percent since 1998 - the authors of the India study suggested that taxation would avert 4.2 percent of prevalent excess weight/obesity and 2.5 percent of type-2 diabetes cases.
     
    In India, the weather impacts fizzy drink demand more than higher tax
     
    In July 2014, the Indian government increased the tax on sugar-sweetened beverages by five percent, hoping to curb consumption.
     
    With that, the tax on sugar-sweetened beverages touched approximately 18 percent, which sounds high but not enough to make a sizeable dent in demand, according to IndiaSpend’s analyses.
     
    Sales of aerated beverages increased 10 perccent in 2014, according to the Indian Beverage Association, a lobby group. This is because “summer had already passed by July 2014, when the tax was increased”, Arvind Varma, secretary-general of the Indian Beverage Association, told IndiaSpend. About 40 percent of the soft-drink industry’s annual sales occur between April and June.
     
    Sales of aerated beverages declined 10 percent between April and September 2015, “primarily because of the mild summer of 2015, but the additional five tax on aerated beverages has only served to deepen the impact on the industry”, said Varma.
     
    Coca-Cola, the industry leader, referred to “unseasonal weather” for a “mid single-digit decline” in India sales between April and June 2015, with sales growing four percent between July and September.
     
    Sales of sugar-sweetened fizzy beverages grew nine in 2014, when the extra tax was imposed, according to Euromonitor International, a market-intelligence company that projected similar sales growth in 2015.
     
    If India’s last five percent tax hike has not served to curtail demand for sugary drinks, it may be time for another round of increases.
     
    “India can expect the consumption of sugary beverages to fall in response to taxes that are high enough, because India, like Mexico, has a surfeit of price-conscious consumers and comparatively lower income levels, consumer segments that are more price-sensitive,” said Barry Popkin, professor of nutrition, University of North Carolina, and co-author of the Mexican study that advocates taxes as a disincentive.
     
    In greater awareness, lies India’s health
     
    The government should raise taxes, launch awareness campaigns and curtail soft-drink availability, especially in schools and sports complexes, said health experts.
     
    “Higher tax is definitely one of the strongest interventions to reduce consumption, but it should be accompanied with robust behavioural interventions to change social norms and perceptions,” said Manu Raj Mathur, research scientist and assistant professor at the Public Health Foundation of India advocacy. Mathur studies ways to reduce the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among adolescents and schoolchildren.
     
    “Increasing awareness about the risks and health consequences of high sugar intake would help inspire sorely-needed dietary changes-permanently,” said Hemalatha R of Hyderabad's National Institute of Nutrition.
     
    Mathur said their interactions with adolescents from private schools in Delhi and their parents and teachers show that most believe sugar-sweetened beverages to mainly be fizzy drinks. “They did not recognise fruit juices in tetra packs as sugar-sweetened beverages and even referred to them as healthy alternatives to Coke and Pepsi,” he said.
     
    Packaged fruit juices contain added sugar, as do most dairy-based beverages and sport and energy drinks. Parents and teachers want prominent film stars and sports people to counter celebrity endorsements of sugary drinks. Such advertisements lead adolescents into believing that sugary beverages in moderation are not harmful - a prominent qualitative finding of Mathur’s study.
     
    Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
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    User

    COMMENTS

    manoharlalsharma

    4 years ago

    Sweet heart death has to come one day why to worry,ye hai GITA KA GYAN.

    Shirish Sadanand Shanbhag

    4 years ago

    All beverages with gas, sugar and caffeine are bad for health.

    REPLY

    Pramod B Patil

    In Reply to Shirish Sadanand Shanbhag 4 years ago

    Do Not Drink Coke,Pepsi.Its Really Toilet Cleaner Must Watch Exposed By Rajiv Dixit
    https://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nE2wHrwhio8

    We are listening!

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