Awesome Screenshot: Take Shots, Record, Save, Share
Awesome Screenshot is a versatile Chrome extension. Once installed in Chrome, you can take screenshots of whatever is on your screen—be it an image or a video. It makes screen sharing fast and easy. 
 
You may record screen as well as camera to explain anything clearly. Once recorded, you can instantly save your stuff on the cloud link or Google Drive or on your local disk. Once saved, you can instantly share these with your friends, colleagues or clients. You can even connect directly with your familiar tools such as Trello, Slack, Asana, Jira, etc.
 
The two-tab pop-up menu allows you to switch between screen recording and screen capture easily. Want to share your screen for cases like reporting technical issue, making product demo or how-to tutorials? Set the ‘Record’ tab as the primary tab in ‘Options’ and start recording whenever needed. 
 
What more can one say about this extension? It is just awesome!
 
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    COMMENTS

    lakshmanan.nithin

    2 weeks ago

    Brilliant

    Zuckerberg bought Instagram as it was a 'threat' to Facebook, reveals Anti-trust Subcommittee
    The US House antitrust subcommittee has made public the email exchanges between Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and former chief financial officer David Ebersman, revealing that the company (and Zuckerberg, in particular) wanted to buy Instagram to avoid competition as it could have hurt the social network.
     
    Rep Jerry Nadler (D-NY) on Wednesday grilled Zuckerberg about the Instagram acquisition during the testimonies from the Big Tech CEOs, including Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Sundar Pichai of Google and Tim Cook of Apple.
     
    The emails revealed that Zuckerberg wanted to buy Instagram as it was becoming a threat to Facebook.
     
    "Facebook, by its own admission saw Instagram as a threat that could potentially siphon business away from Facebook," Nadler said during the hearing on Wednesday.
     
    "So rather than compete with it, Facebook bought it. This is exactly the type of anti-competitive acquisition the antitrust laws were designed to prevent," Nadler added.
     
    Facebook bought Instagram for $1 billion in 2012, a shocking sum at that time for a company with 13 employees,
     
    Instagram today has over one billion users and contributes over $20 billion to Facebook's annual revenue.
     
    "I think the FTC had all of these documents and unanimously voted at the time not to challenge the acquisition," Zuckerberg said on Wednesday.
     
    "In hindsight, it probably looks obvious that Instagram would have reached the scale that it has today. But at the time, it was far from obvious."
     
    According to The Verge, the FTC completed its review of the acquisition in 2012 without holding any open hearings or issuing a public report.
     
    The agency said it might reopen the inquiry at an unspecified future date, "as the public interest may require."
     
    Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
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    Australian watchdog sues Google over users' personal data use
    Australia's anti-competition watchdog on Monday launched federal court proceedings against Google, alleging that the subsidiary of Sundar Pichai-run Alphabet misled consumers to obtain their consent to expand the scope of personal data and earn more via targeted advertising.
     
    The conduct is likely to impact millions of Australians with Google accounts as the Search engine giant could collect and combine personal data about consumers' internet activity, for other use by the company, including for targeted advertising.
     
    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) alleged in a statement that Google misled consumers when it failed to properly inform consumers, and did not gain their explicit informed consent in 2016.
     
    The company then started combining personal information in consumers' Google accounts with information about those individuals' activities on non-Google sites that used Google technology, formerly DoubleClick technology, to display ads.
     
    It meant that this data about users' non-Google online activity became linked to their names and other identifying information held by Google. 
     
    Previously, this information had been kept separately from users' Google accounts, meaning the data was not linked to an individual user, according to the ACCC.
     
    Google was yet to address the concerns raised by the ACCC.
     
    Google used newly combined information to improve the commercial performance of its advertising businesses, alleged the competition regulator, adding that Google also misled consumers about a related change to its privacy policy.
     
    "We are taking this action because we consider Google misled Australian consumers about what it planned to do with large amounts of their personal information, including internet activity on websites not connected to Google," said ACCC Chair Rod Sims.
     
    Google significantly increased the scope of information it collected about consumers on a personally identifiable basis. 
     
    "This included potentially very sensitive and private information about their activities on third-party websites. It then used this information to serve up highly targeted advertisements without consumers' express informed consent," Sims added.
     
    The use of this new combined information allowed Google to significantly increase "the value of its advertising products", from which it generated much higher profits.
     
    "The ACCC considers that consumers effectively pay for Google's services with their data, so this change introduced by Google increased the "price" of Google's services, without consumers' knowledge
     
    From June 28, 2016 until at least December 2018, Google account holders were prompted to click "I agree" to a pop-up notification from Google that purported to explain how it planned to combine their data, and sought the consumers' consent for this.
     
    The notification also stated, "More information will be available in your Google Account making it easier for you to review and control"; and "Google will use this information to make ads across the web more relevant for you."
     
    Before June 2016, Google only collected and used, for advertising purposes, personally identifiable information about Google account users' activities on Google owned services and apps like Google Search and YouTube.
     
    The ACCC alleged that the "I agree" notification was misleading, because consumers could not have properly understood the changes Google was making nor how their data would be used, and so did not - and could not - give informed consent.
     
    "We believe that many consumers, if given an informed choice, may have refused Google permission to combine and use such a wide array of their personal information for Google's own financial benefit," said Sims.
     
    In 2008, Google acquired DoubleClick, a supplier of ad-serving technology services to publishers and advertisers.
     
    Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
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