Apple does Jio with TV+ disruption, enters OTT space with bang
With over 1.4 billion active installed base of devices globally and millions in India - iPhones, iPads, Apple TV, Macs, iPod touch and more - Apple has finally flexed its muscles to take on content streaming giants like Netflix, HBO, Amazon Prime and Disney with aggressive pricing, free offers and all-original stories.
 
The announcement of a much cheaper Apple TV+ subscription than expected (Rs 99 a month in India and $4.99 in the US and other countries) immediately saw shares of Netflix, Disney and Roku tumbling down as Apple, which has nearly $210 billion cash at its disposal, has sensed the mammoth streaming opportunity that lies ahead and is going to open its coffers for creating more originals, even in regional languages.
 
Indians today spend 30 per cent of their phone time and over 70 per cent of mobile data on entertainment and movies are their preferred choice on smart TV and larger screens.
 
An over-the-top (OTT) viewer in India is spending approximately 70 minutes a day on video streaming platforms, with a consumption frequency of 12.5 times a week, an Eros Now-KPMG report said last week.
 
When we look at the data consumption, In India, the Internet video traffic is projected to reach 13.5 Exabytes (EB) per month by 2022 -- up from 1.5 EB a month in 2017 -- with video contributing 77 per cent of all Internet traffic by 2022.
 
The opportunities are enormous and Apple TV+ with its large installed device base is smiling at its rivals who lack the vantage point of being in your home in the form of an iphone or iPad.
 
"Apple built on their integrated ecosystem advantage by announcing low-monthly pricing for Apple Arcade and Apple TV+, and a free year of Apple TV for a buyer of an Apple device," said Frank Gillett, Vice President and Principal Analyst at Forrester.
 
"Though it can all be labeled incremental innovation, Apple maintained its disciplined approach to delivering industry-leading features and experiences built on well-engineered hardware, software and services," Gillett told IANS.
 
Netflix, which has reached 1.3 million subscribers in India, just unveiled its mobile subscription plan for India at Rs 199 per month. This is its fourth Indian plan, in addition to the existing basic, standard and premium plans which are priced between Rs 499 and Rs 799.
 
Amazon Prime Video a" part of Amazon's Prime subscription a" costs Rs 129 each month.
 
Soon to be available at Rs 99 a month, Apple TV+ will also be available (via Apple TV app) on select Samsung smart TVs and will come to Amazon Fire TV, LG, Roku, Sony and VIZIO platforms soon.
 
If you buy a new iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Mac or iPod touch, you can enjoy one year of Apple TV+ for free. Once the free period is over, you will still pay Rs 99 a month. Through family sharing, up to six family members can share one Apple TV+ subscription.
 
On offer are nine originals from the world's most celebrated creative artists that will debut on the Apple TV app on November 1.
 
For example, "See" -- an epic drama starring Jason Momoa and Alfre Woodard -- is set 600 years in the future after a virus has decimated humankind and rendered the remaining population blind.
 
"The Morning Show" drama starring and produced by Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston explores the world of morning news and the ego, ambition and the misguided search for power behind the people who help America wake up in the morning.
 
"Dickinson" is a darkly comedic coming-of-age story, explores the constraints of society, gender and family through the lens of rebellious young poet, Emily Dickinson.
 
Other upcoming originals are "Servant," a new psychological thriller from M. Night Shyamalan and "Truth Be Told," a gripping new series starring Academy Award winner Octavia Spencer and Emmy Award winner Aaron Paul, among others.
 
Prabhu Ram, Head-Industry Intelligence Group (IIG), CyberMedia Research (CMR), said that with the Apple TV+, Apple has made a significant statement of its intent, and its push towards offering new value propositions to its user base.
 
"By pricing its subscription low, and bundling free annual subscription with its devices, Apple has focused on a very smart and prudent strategy to build a sizable subscriber base and, drive revenues," Ram told IANS.
 
In India, the over-the-top (OTT) leader Netflix plans to invest Rs 600 crore per year in originals whereas Amazon Prime had committed Rs 223 crore in 2017 for the next 2-3 years in the country. For some original series, Amazon and Netflix are spending in the range of Rs 1-2 crore per episode.
 
Apple, on the other hand, has reportedly planned to spend $6 billion on creating original content.
 
Once a hobby for Apple, the content streaming has become a full-fledged business and is set to disrupt the OTT and subscription video streaming industry globally including in India.
 
"Make no mistake, the Apple TV+ not only takes on the competition head on, its bundled subscription will also potentially contribute as a pivot to increasing iPhone and iPad sales," Ram noted.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  • Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

    User

    COMMENTS

    Ramesh Poapt

    2 weeks ago

    jio's new plans'success is doubtful.

    ANILKUMAR MEHTA

    2 weeks ago

    good

    Buy iPhone 11 for Rs64,900 in India on Sept 27
    Apple has announced India pricing of newly-launched iPhones -- available in the country from September 27 -- and the starting iPhone 11 model (64GB) with dual camera rear setup will cost you Rs 64,900.
     
    iPhone 11 will be available in 64GB, 128GB and 256GB models in purple, green, yellow, black, white and PRODUCT(RED), starting at Rs 64,900.
     
    iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max with triple camera set-up will be available in 64GB, 256GB and 512GB models in midnight green, space gray, silver and gold, starting at Rs 99,900 and Rs 109,900 respectively. 
     
    Apple Watch Series 5 (GPS) starts at Rs 40,900 and Apple Watch Series 5 (GPS + Cellular) starts at Rs 49,900.
     
    Apple TV+ will be available on the Apple TV app for Rs 99 per month with a seven-day free trial. 
     
    Starting from Tuesday, customers who purchase any iPhone can enjoy one year of Apple TV+ for free.
     
    The gaming service Apple Arcade on the App Store will be available with iOS 13 as a subscription for Rs 99 per month and is launching with a one-month free trial.
     
    Users get unlimited access to the entire catalog of over 100 new, exclusive games, all playable across iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, Mac and Apple TV.
     
    iOS 13 will be available on September 19 as a free software update for iPhone 6s and later. 
     
    Additional software features will be available on September 30 with iOS 13.1, announced Apple.
     
    Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  • User

    How Free Mobile Apps Earn Money through Permissions
    Mobile applications, especially those available on Google Play Store, are increasingly becoming more dangerous, in terms of the information they are gathering through access to users’ personal data. 
     
    For example, a simple app like a flashlight (not many use it due to built-in torch feature of smartphones) seeks as many as 25 permissions, on an average, that are not even related to its actual use. The majority of the free apps seek several permissions while installing and then monetise your data by showing advertisements or sharing the user's personal data with third parties. 
     
    Applications can request permissions to access data or features on devices they need, to function properly. For example, the flashlight application needs access to the phone's flash to use it as a flashlight. However, many such applications request access to more permissions than they actually need. 
     
    In an analysis, digital security services-provider Avast found that out of the 937 flashlight apps, 408 request 10 permissions or less; 267 request between 11 and 49 permissions, and 262 apps request between 50 and 77 permissions. 
     
    "Some of the permissions requested by the flashlight applications we looked into are really hard to explain, like the right to record audio, requested by 77 apps; read contact lists, requested by 180 apps, or even write contacts, which 21 flashlight apps request permission to do," says Luis Corrons, security evangelist at Avast.
     
     
    Any mobile app seeking more permissions than it needs is not only dangerous, but has potential to harm the user either financially or through misusing personal data, thus violating user privacy. However, what makes it worse is the user, who is not aware about these things, grants these permissions without knowing or understanding the implications. 
     
    For example, not many users will think twice while granting blanket permissions to a flashlight app. One of the common reasons I have come across from such users is "I have nothing to hide so why should not I grant these permissions?"  Such 'lazy' reasoning shows the lack of understanding of the interconnected and greedy digital world. 
     
    For example, the same flashlight app may be accessing and sharing all your contacts, call logs or even record calls only to share with a third-party, without your knowledge. 
     
    Apps can request outlandish permissions, but that does not mean that they carry out malicious activities, per se. But then why would an app like the flashlight need access to contacts or even permission to record audio? 
     
    Mr Corrons from Avast explains this. He says, "The flashlight apps we looked into are just an example of how even the simplest apps can access personal data, and it is often not just the app developers that gain access to data when users download an app, but the ad partners they work with to monetise. Developer privacy policies are unfortunately not inclusive, as in many cases, further privacy policies from third-parties are linked within them."
     
    Permission asked by mobile apps and granted by users is a grey area. Some apps that the user wants will not be installed if even a single permission is denied or some app may not work properly without those permissions. Interestingly, not all permissions are needed by the app developer. Sometimes, the app developers integrate ad software development kits (SDKs) into their code to earn money from advertisers. To allow these SDKs to target users with ads, the apps request countless permissions.
     
    In its analysis, Avast found as many as 282 apps seeking permission like KILL_BACKGROUND_PROCESSES, which are very powerful and can be abused for malicious purposes. For example, it could be used to kill a security app.
     
    What is more shocking is that the analysis from Avast found as many as 208 flashlight app requesting the same permissions. "Most of APKs are different versions of the same app, and right now there are 10 apps on the Google Play Store with more than 2 million downloads. There are five different developer groups behind these apps, according to the developer ID shown on the Google Play Store; however, according to my research, I can confirm that at least some of them are the same, just using a different developer ID. This appears to be a developer or group of developers with a monetisation system, harvesting users’ data and sharing the data with partners," Mr Corrons says.
     
    So What You Should Do?
    1. Before installing any mobile app, make it a habit to read about the app, and its reviews. Notice if reviewers comment on whether or not the app does what it says it will do.  
     
    2. Check permissions that the app needs. Granting incorrect permissions can send sensitive data to cybercriminals, including information such as contacts stored on the device, media files and insights into personal chats. 
     
    3. Do read the privacy policies and terms and conditions of the app, as mentioned by the developer.

    4. Find out more details of the developer. As I had discussed in my earlier article, Blatant misuse of national emblem, govt logos by mobile apps makers, several apps under the name of Aadhaar were owned by private developers who were misusing the national emblem and official logos of various government departments.

    5. Install a trustworthy anti-virus app, which acts as a safety net, and can identify apps that are infected with adware or malware.     
     
  • Like this story? Get our top stories by email.

    User

    COMMENTS

    B. KRISHNAN

    1 week ago

    Thanks for a very helpful article.

    Sudhir Mankodi

    2 weeks ago

    Very informative. Puts everyone downloading apps on caution.

    We are listening!

    Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
      Loading...
    Close

    To continue


    Please
    Sign Up or Sign In
    with

    Email
    Close

    To continue


    Please
    Sign Up or Sign In
    with

    Email

    BUY NOW

    online financial advisory
    Pathbreakers
    Pathbreakers 1 & Pathbreakers 2 contain deep insights, unknown facts and captivating events in the life of 51 top achievers, in their own words.
    online financia advisory
    The Scam
    24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
    Moneylife Online Magazine
    Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
    financial magazines online
    Stockletters in 3 Flavours
    Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
    financial magazines in india
    MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
    (Includes Moneylife Online Magazine)