Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Zuckerberg slams Facebook director over offensive Tweet
New York : Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday disowned his colleagues's controversial statement that Free Basics was same as colonialism, saying it was "deeply upsetting".
 
Zuckerberg came down heavily on Facebook board member Marc Andreessen for his offensive tweet that created an uproar on the social media. 
 
"I want to respond to Marc Andreessen's comments about India yesterday. I found the comments deeply upsetting, and they do not represent the way Facebook or I think at all," Zuckerberg wrote in a Facebook post. 
 
"India has been personally important to me and Facebook. Early on in my thinking about our mission, I travelled to India and was inspired by the humanity, spirit and values of the people. It solidified my understanding that when all people have the power to share their experiences, the entire world will make progress," he said. 
 
Earlier, a tweet by Andreessen left many Indians lashing out against him on Facebook as well as on Twitter.
 
Andreessen wrote on Twitter: "Anti-colonialism has been economically catastrophic for the Indian people for decades. Why stop now?"
 
Although the tweet was subsequently deleted, the comment -- made after India's telecom watchdog the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) said no to discriminatory pricing of data content -- led to several Indians storming the social networking sites with angry reactions.
 
According to Zuckerberg, Facebook stands for helping to connect people and giving them voice to shape their own future.
 
"But to shape the future we need to understand the past. As our community in India has grown, I've gained a deeper appreciation for the need to understand India's history and culture," he posted.
 
"I've been inspired by how much progress India has made in building a strong nation and the largest democracy in the world, and I look forward to strengthening my connection to the country," the 31-year-old billionaire added.
 
On Monday, TRAI said in a much-awaited regulatory order that "No service provider shall offer or charge discriminatory tariffs for data services on the basis of content."
 
"No service provider shall enter into any arrangement, agreement or contract, by whatever name called, with any person, natural or legal, that has the effect of discriminatory tariffs for data services being offered or charged to the consumer on the basis of content," the watchdog added.
 
Reacting to the TRAI order, Facebook said it was "disappointed with the outcome", but will continue its "efforts to eliminate barriers and give the unconnected an easier path to the Internet".
 
"While I am disappointed with the decision, I want to personally communicate that we are committed to keep working to break down barriers to connectivity in India and around the world. Internet.org has many initiatives, and we will keep working until everyone has access to the internet," Zuckerberg had posted on Facebook.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Celebrating Indian roots of Charlie Chaplin, Elvis Presley
New Delhi : What do Charlie Chaplin, Elvis Presley and Pablo Picasso have in common? They all belong to the Roma community whose Indian roots will be discussed at the fifth Roma conference and cultural festival organised by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) here.
 
The three-day conference cum cultural festival would commence from Friday at Azad Bhawan, I.P. Estate here.
 
External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj would inaugurate the conference that will see participation from 35 Roma delegates and a dozen artistes drawn from as many countries countries, ICCR director general C. Rajasekhar said.
 
Roma are said to be descendants of groups in India like Dom, Banjara, Gujjar, Sansi, Chauhan, Sikligar, Dhangar etc. and other nomadic groups from northwest India.
 
There are many reputed names who belong to the Roma community such as Pablo Picasso, Elvis Presley, Charlie Chaplin, two-times Oscar winner Michael Caine, Flamenco dancer Michaela Flores Amaya, tennis player Ilie Nastase, violinist Janos Bihari and Greek singer Glykeria Kotsoula.
 
"The Romani people constitute an important and colourful component of people of Indian origin. They cherish and maintain cultural and traditional practices of Indian heritage.
 
"We need to recognise and celebrate this and also need to promote greater awareness about this significant linkage," Rajasekhar said.
 
"The Roma conference is also a reflection of Indian's age old outlook, that the entire universe is one family, 'vasudhaiva kutubakam'," he added.
 
The Roma are known by different names in different countries like Zigeuner in Germany, Tsyiganes or Manus in France, Tatara in Sweden, Gitano in Spain, Tshingan in Turkey and Greece, Tsigan in Russia, Bulgaria and Romania and as Gypsies in Britain, according to Shashi Bala, joint secretary, Indian Council for International Cooperation.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

shadi katyal

10 months ago

This is forst time we are learning that such well known namea are from Romam the gypsy of Europe. Yes it has been mentioned that they came from Indis with invaders to Europe but has any DNA tests been done or just trying to prove WHAT?? Is this going to be another Hinduvta claimn of even S.American Maya dynsty from India??

REPLY

Narendra Kumar S.S

In Reply to shadi katyal 10 months ago

Why are you so much worried?
People from 12 countries are attending this conference. They belong to that Roma community. So, let them discuss, check their DNA or even RNA or anything else to prove or disprove.

shadi katyal

In Reply to Narendra Kumar S.S 10 months ago

Why shouold it worry me but it did unfortunatly disturb you.
We have many problems while we still mired in our Dalit and discrimination of our own population and trying to claim such well known as ours.
What will it bring to Indian poor and malcourshed.

Left? Right? Right? Left?
The perils of symmetry
 
The author was in hospital with a broken leg, circa 1976. The surgeon was the best in Bombay. The operation could not begin because of a missing tool—a drill. In the meantime, a nurse narrated a funny story. Just goes to show how Murphy’s Law works. If something can go wrong, it will.
Sometime earlier, my surgeon had to operate on someone’s knee. He opened up the wrong one. Parsis, being a small community, the story spread like wildfire. It so happened that another woman was to be operated on, some time later. As she went under sedation, she plaintively kept on reminding the doctor. “This one, doctor; this one. Doctor, Doctor, this one.”
 
Torts are a fascinating field of law. It fulfils our favourite cliché; ‘If there is a malady, there has to be a remedy’. Ubi Jus Ibi Remedium. Since all rights are not, and cannot be, codified, lawyers find great opportunities in the Law of Torts. And in the doctrine of distinct and obvious proof.
 
This is one such case. In normal parlance, a doctor’s mistake is termed ‘medical negligence’. If a patient’s relatives are, for some reason, upset, they either hammer the doctor, beat up the staff or damage the hospital property. While emotions can, understandably, run amok, there are more civilised methods. The term is bandied about rather freely these days, thanks to what are called ‘Consumers’ Courts’. Sue. Sue the doctor, the staff, the hospital, its trustees; even the hamal. For that, one needs to go to court. And face a dispassionate judge.
 
Ms Crispin had a problem. She consulted a knee doctor, Dr Hostin. The good doctor recommended surgery. The operation was scheduled. The day arrived. The procedure began. The patient was anaesthetised. The operation started. All this while Dr Hostin was in another room. Talk of overworked surgeons. As he entered, he saw the damaged ligament on the operating room’s monitor. Medical science and electronics were at work. Unfortunately, plain common sense was not.
 
The operation was started by a junior. He had, somehow, in spite of a marked knee, hit the wrong target. Did that knee also have a torn ligament? What is that which Dr Hostin did see on the monitor? Did he not have time to check the written report? Did he not remember which knee he had examined earlier?
 
Ms Crispin awoke to a new world. The left was undone, not the damaged right. OMG.  There is no fury like a woman wrongly cut up. Ms Crispin hauled the lot to court. The doctor led the defendants. Then followed the hospital, the assistant. The judge was asked for an instant order. Dr Hostin gave an explanation. He was in another room for another operation. He mistook the tear on the monitor as being the right, as opposed to the left, knee. The right was the right, the left was not the right. With just the choice of one out of two, he had it figured wrong. He came to realise the boo-boo later; too late, actually. His defence was that, no more.
 
Shades of the Parsi woman’s story. Ms Crispin’s lawyer was a smart cookie. He did not wish to go through a long and tortuous, arduous ordeal. He asked for a ‘jatka’ justice. How does that work? Res ipsa loquitur; Latin for ‘The thing speaks for itself’. When the sun is shining high, it has to be day. No explanation is needed.
 
The judge agreed. Guilty as charged. Summary justice. Dispensed on the spot.
 
This story will warm the cockles of Indian hearts. Go into court, come out with an order. Ah! A perfect world. But it cannot always be so. Even when the evidence is overwhelming, the defendant may not be so forthcoming with his ‘confession’ as was the good doctor.
 
Maybe the problem can be solved by marking both limbs. One with a tick (correct) mark; the other with a cross. And then hope that the doctor remembers which is which.
 
Never was there a story
Of more errant sin,
Than that of Hostin
And his patient, Crispin. 
(With apologies to Juliet and her Romeo)
PS. The author was awake during his operation. A lot of banter, perfect job. No case.
 

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