Citizens' Issues
With Israeli help, agriculture to be Goa's next Make in India story
Goa Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI) president Narayan Bandekar said that the state would do well to tap crop, post-harvest technologies and water management from a nation known for world class agri-technology
 
After defence, Goa's next Make in India footprint could be in the agriculture sector even as industry captains and politicians in the state look to learn lessons from Israel's agriculture success story.
 
Goa Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GCCI) president Narayan Bandekar said that the state would do well to tap crop, post-harvest technologies and water management from a nation known for world class agri-technology.
 
"Of course, agriculture is an area which we are looking to start a Make in India project with Israel's help," Bandekar told IANS after a meeting here with Israeli consul general in Mumbai David Akov.
 
He also said that GCCI was discussing a few agriculture-oriented projects with the state government and that a final decision would be taken soon.
 
While former chief minister Manohar Parrikar's elevation to New Delhi as defence minister has already yielded a Make in India contract to a central government-operated shipyard in Goa to manufacture eight minesweepers, Goa Speaker Rajendra Arlekar said that Israeli help should be sought to infuse life in the state's stagnant agriculture sector.
 
"There should not be any room for any questions. We wanted to work together. That is the reason he (Akov) is here," Arlekar said of the diplomat's visit to the state.
 
Agriculture in Goa comprises cultivation of crops like paddy, cashew, coconut and seasonal vegetables and pulses, and provides livelihood support to nearly 12 per cent of the state's 1.5 million population.
 
Escalating real estate prices, high labour costs and farm share-holdings shrinking with every generation has however made agriculture a less attractive proposition as compared to mining, tourism and employment in the service sector.
 
Investment in agriculture and water technology, according to Akov, could help make farming in Goa competitive.
 
"We could have ties with either the government or research organisations here in Goa... there are other private institutions (in Israel) which could be relevant for the specific kind of agriculture here. Some of them involve technology which could change and improve the crops here," Akov said.
 
The consul general also said that Maharashtra Chief minister Devendra Fadnavis, whose state incidentally sees the highest percentage of farmers' suicides, had travelled to Israel in April to seek out technology which deals with water and agriculture management.
 
Despite a desert accounting for nearly half of Israel, the country is known for its cutting-edge agriculture technology which has helped it to produce as much as 95 per cent of its domestic food requirements.
 
"Eighty-five percent of Israeli waste water is recycled and used for agriculture," Akov said.
 
He also said that by first starting to work together in the agriculture sector, both Goa and Israel could also start looking at other areas of cooperation, dropping hints at increasing cooperation in the tourism, dairy and water management sectors.
 
Ever since the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP)-led coalition government came to power in 2012, Goa has been actively wooing Israel to resurrect its agriculture story.
 
In 2013, a state government delegation had travelled to Israel to interact with the country's agro-industry and dairy experts.

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COMMENTS

amnon ofen

2 years ago

Israel and Goa can collaborate in the Agricultural sector in order to upgrade its farmers situation.
The challenge is hot to it to the small shareholding farmers in India and in Goa particularly.
This means to use more efficiency technology , like Drip Irrigation which not only save water and fertilizers but also giving 3 time more income than other systems as Flood Irrigation. Another Israeli technology to be use and implement is to grow under plastic such Green House , Tunnels which would be able to grow during the monsoon raining
and through all the year. Most important to know is that key for the success of the growing of Goa Agriculture is the Agronomic Knowhow and the backing to the Farmers.
The government have to take care in this aspects and to invest and to bring this Agronomic Knowhow by establishing a Training & Demonstrations Agro Center , to enlarge the "Extension Services" to the farmers , giving subsidies to farmers to shift to more advance and economic technologies systems and working close with the Agro companies and the Private Sector. We at NaanDanJain, Israele and Jain Irrigation India doing and it India in the last 20 years all around India and would like to collaborate with the Goa Authorities
In upgrading the Agriculture Sector and Farmers at Goa
Warm Regards- Amnon Ofen , Director , NaanDanJain Irrigation , Israel.

Coutinho

2 years ago

Being a local Goal, first get the draconian agricultural land laws fixed esp. Mundkarial Act and Tenancy act started by erstwhile first Chief Minister of Goa...Mr. Bandodker which is completely against Land owners... Then talk about agriculture...

Moneylife IMPACT: SEBI bars VPS Advisory from offering PMS, collecting funds from investors
Moneylife wrote about VPS Advisory that was promising 20% assured return from stock trading. Taking cognisance of the article, SEBI initiated a probe and after two years, barred the firm from offering PMS and collecting money from investors
 
Two years after Moneylife wrote about an advisory firm promising 20% return from stock market trading, regulator Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI) has taken action against VPS Advisory Services and its proprietor Varun Pratap Singh. In an ex-parte order, SEBI has asked VPS Advisory and Singh not to collect funds and offer portfolio management services (PMS) to clients without obtaining due registration from the market regulator.
 
In an order, S Raman, whole time member of SEBI said, "...steps have to be taken in the instant matter to prevent VPS from soliciting and collecting funds from investors and carrying on portfolio management services without due registration from SEBI. It becomes necessary for SEBI to take urgent preventive action. In light of the same, I find there is no other alternative but to take recourse through an ad interim ex-parte order against VPS for preventing it from collecting funds and offering portfolio management activities without obtaining registration from SEBI in accordance with the law."
 
Taking cognisance of Moneylife article published in June 2013, the market regulator states, "SEBI came across an article dated 25 June 2013, published in "Moneylife" regarding the activities of VPS Advisory Services wherein it was alleged that VPS had promised 20% returns on the investments. It was observed from its website viz., www.vpsadvisory.com that VPS offers various investment advisory services to the investors."
 
After going through all the documents and information available on record, SEBI observed that:
i. VPS is a proprietorship firm, established on 6 December 2013 by Shri Varun Pratap Singh as the proprietor and having its office at A-65, Govindpuri, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh. However, VPS was running its business from Bangalore from A1, Ist Floor, Savithri Residency, No. 51 & 52, Yellapa Garden, Bangalore - 560085. Shri Varun Pratap Singh was a registered sub-broker of Sharekhan in the trade name Bangalore Consultancy Services till November 2013. 
 
ii. VPS vide letter dated 19 December 2013 and email dated 11 June 2014 stated that VPS provided Portfolio Management Services a few clients. It was also stated "PMS Services were started on the requests on the request of the clients. The Service was started from March 2012 and stopped in December 2013'. During this tenure we have published various clients’ demat account on our website which shows the performance of the PMS services."
 
iii. VPS is collecting funds from investors and manages their funds by investing in derivatives segment;
 
iv. VPS was providing advisory services in cash, derivative segments and also in commodity markets. Fee structure for availing advisory services was stated as Rs10,000 per month for cash and derivative segment and Rs5,000 per month for commodities.
 
v. Five employees were engaged in providing advisory services to 58 clients in last six months.
 
vi. Guaranteed returns were offered to its clients.
 
vii. Trading was done through the trading accounts of the clients availing PMS from VPS.
 
viii. PMS were offered by VPS since March 2012 and most of the clients were individuals. On the basis of the information furnished by VPS, it is apparent that PMS were offered to at least nine clients. From the analysis of Bank statements provided by various banks, it is observed that there are several deposits into the bank accounts from many clients, which are equivalent to the fees charged by VPS for various advisory services offered by VPS.
 
Raman, SEBI's whole time member, said, "As per VPS's own admissions vide emails dated 11th June and 14 July 2014, he used to provide portfolio management services to its clients. In this regard, it is also noted from the bank statements that various clients had paid fees to VPS for the services availed. In the light the above discussions and analysis, I conclude that the activities carried out by VPS clearly falls under the definition of "portfolio manager" specified under Regulation 2(cb) of PMS Regulations. Further, VPS was also offering guaranteed returns to general public. VPS is engaged in providing portfolio management services to investors without necessary registration for the same as mandated by Section 12(1) of Securities and Exchange Board of India Act, 1992 read with Regulation 3 of PMS Regulations."
 
This is not the first time we wrote about such firms big on ‘guarantees’ with promises of lavish and ‘assured’ returns. We had first exposed about the Stockguru scam, which promised investors 120% returns, way back in 2010, but regulators did nothing then. Three years later, Stock Guru duped investors to the extent of Rs1,500 crore, mainly because of no action from regulators. Stockguru was offering Rs22,000 on an investment of Rs10,000 in one year, and called itself investment advisors. Unfortunately, the lack of financial literacy and regulation meant investors fell for it. And lost money.
 

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COMMENTS

Vaibhav Dhoka

2 years ago

Congratulations Moneylife.Though it took two years for SEBI,it seems that it has to take cognizance.SEBI should come with data about loss incurred by investors in this firm and what punitive action is being taken to stop such entities from access to market.

Translations help regional Indian literature reach wider audience
English, being adopted as primary language, has opened up the doors for translators to escalate the works of vernacular writers
 
Shankar's "Chowringhee" would have remained restricted to Bengalis and Manto's work would have been imbibed only by Urdu readers if these works were not translated. In the past few years, translations in Indian literature have evolved with their own identity - reaching out to a wider audience.
 
English, being adopted as primary language, has opened up the doors for translators to escalate the works of vernacular writers.
 
Yet, there persists a void, which the translators at times fail to fill.
 
"Translations do fail to carry the same emotions at times. Sometimes, it is quite difficult to actually understand and communicate the same emotion effectively in another language," said Prashant Pethe, 38, who translated into English the popular Marathi book "Aiwa Maru", originally written by Anant Samant, told IANS.
 
A similar thought was echoed by Snehal Shingavi, who translated into English "Angaaray", a collection of short stories in Urdu by Sajjad Zaheer, Ahmed Ali, Rashid Jahan and Mahmud-uz-Zafar.
 
"One almost always fails but must try. Otherwise it means giving in to parochialism and particularism in a world that is in desperate need of more understanding," Shingavi, 39, told IANS.
 
Talking about the difficulties and complexities faced while translating their works, the authors emphasised on how crucial it becomes to play with words to avoid repetition.
 
"Word play is a challenge, but it is something that all translators have to do. Certain concepts can be very flexible in one language and rigid in another, but one tries to make sure that the sense of the original is retained. Sometimes you have to be creative in making that work," said Shingavi, an assistant professor of English at the University of Texas, Austin.
 
Pethe, being a seaman (he has worked on offshore oil and gas rigs), could relate to the story of "Aiwa Maru", which is a story based on life at sea and put himself in the narrator's shoes. But this didn't reduce his troubles while translating.
 
"The focus was always to understand what the writer wants to say and express it in English. I just tried to follow my instincts and it has worked in whatever little work I have done," adds Pethe, who is settled in Pune.
 
Adding to the complexities, the translators also spoke about doing justice to the characters and bringing in changes without hampering the essence of the original.
 
"I did make changes. Sometimes the Urdu would sound strange when it was rendered in English. Sometimes I had to move words around. I think this is a necessary part of translation," said Snehal when asked about changes made in his translated work.
 
Unlike Snehal, Pethe didn't make many changes in his book as there was less scope to introduce new emotions, apart from changing a few technical terms.
 
The translators also spoke about the English versus vernacular languages debate.
 
"My intention was for the novel to reach more people and English was the natural option for that. 'Aiwa Maru' has remained popular in Marathi for 25 years, proving that if something is worth a read, it will work and the language doesn't matter," said Pethe, adding that he translated the work because he could relate to many things that he came across in the novel.
 
Shingavi said: "The entire ethic of translation is to argue that there are interesting things happening in languages other than English. The translation should be to enrich English, not to prove its supremacy."
 
The translators, however, lamented at their works not being recognised on a larger scale in the Indian book scene.
 
"There are plenty of hidden gems in various Indian languages. It is only recently that they have been re- discovered and it will only enrich the Indian literature in English and ensure that these stories reach a lot more people than the ones in a particular language," Pethe said.
 
The translators were also upset with their efforts not being adequately marketed.
 
Pethe felt that the commercial departments of publishing houses do not contribute wholeheartedly to make the translations reach wider audiences.
 
"Translations fill a much smaller niche market and, therefore, don't always get noticed for the contributions they are making," added Shingavi.
 
However, despite the difficulties in conveying the original emotions, it is clear that translators will soldier on with their works. Three cheers for that!

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