Why revelations of the 'perfect terrorist' matter little
When Headley was arrested more than six years ago, Indian authorities had hoped that the big terror catch by the Americans will help nail Pakistan and its terror lies
 
Media and political brouhaha about David Coleman Headley notwithstanding, the recent admission of the Pakistan-American terrorist about his already known terror links actually mean little to India's Mumbai attack investigations -- not least in New Delhi's attempt to nail Islamabad's complicity in the meticulously planned operation.
 
Headley has off and on been hogging the headlines since his arrest from a Chicago airport in 2009 for his terror odysseys that included surveying targets unsuspectingly in several Indian cities and meeting with senior terrorist operatives of Al Qaeda and Lashkar-e-Taiba in Pakistan.
 
And the master plotter did that for years under the nose of intelligence and security agencies without raising the index of suspicion in the countries, including Denmark, where he scouted freely. He managed to do so without being noticed partly because of his deceptive American looks with heterochromatic eyes and partly because of his "no-guts-no-glory" attitude.
 
When he was arrested more than six years ago, Indian authorities had hoped that the big terror catch by the Americans will help nail Pakistan and its terror lies. But that was not to be.
 
This was revealed by none less than G.K. Pillai, the then home secretary, in an interview with IANS in 2010 when he told me that whatever Headley speaks in the United States, it won't make the Indian case against the Pakistanis any stronger.
 
"I don't think we will get much cooperation from Pakistan. That is not really hoped. We can shout and scream (but) we will have to tackle Pakistan separately," Pillai told me when an Indian team of investigators visited the US to interrogate Headley in a Chicago prison.
 
Pillai was unequivocal in saying that any questioning of Headley was not to nail Pakistan, which he said "is a separate issue" and needed a different strategy than getting evidences from the terror mastermind.
 
That holds good even now despite the fact that India's Minister of State for Home Kiren Rijiju was expecting that Headley'a stating the obvious will end all ambiguity between state and non-state actors involved in the Islamist terrorism that sprouts from Pakistan.
 
Rijiju, in fact, himself admitted that "it is known that who all were involved" but still the government, he said, believes that "Headley's statement will lead to a logical conclusion. It will help us."
 
The inferences from Headley's statement and the minister's reaction are even more obvious. Are we yet to understand that there are no differences between state and non-state actors when it comes to Pakistan's known support for extremism as an instrument of its foreign policy?
 
Moreover, Headley has revealed nothing that was not already known. The names of perpetrators, including from the Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) and the Pakistan Army have already come up in the terror dossiers -- one has lost count of them -- India has handed over to Pakistan. The dossiers include DNA samples of Mumbai attackers, photographs, voice records and detailed operational information of the carnage that was being carried out in India in 2008 and overseen in Pakistan.
 
In fact, all these so-called "revelations" have already been recorded judicially in a US court. All these statements, including the names of the terror masterminds -- Hafiz Saeed, Zaki-ur-Rehman Lakhvi -- have been recorded by the investigators who interrogated Headley in 2010.
 
An argument is being made that India did not know all that judicially before Headley spoke to an Indian judge through videoconferencing from the US jail. Will it really help to make a case against Pakistan is a question that begs an answer.
 
Doesn't look like that is possible. Because the Pakistani court which is hearing the Mumbai attack case against the five accused has rejected as "inadmissible" even what looked like plausible findings of two judicial commissions from that country which visited India for evidence and testimonies. Are we to believe that the Pakistani court will take into account an Indian court's findings out of Headley's testimony?
 
Nothing will change in that country till its security, political and judicial establishments look within and realise in true sense the Frankenstein monster has outgrown everything else there. No Headley's medley of information, known and unknown, is going to change that. Least of all, the terror policy to destabilise India.
 
If Headley's judicially valid statement should change anything, it must be India's alertness of its intelligence and swiftness of its security agencies to thwart and prevent attacks like at Mumbai, which was planned long before by Lashkar and ISI operatives who had employed the "perfect terrorist" to map the city unnoticed for two years and develop a blueprint for the mayhem that killed 166 Indians and foreigners.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

shadi katyal

1 year ago

The price Indis has paid and still paying is the lack of clear understanding of the enemy and lack of our any friendly close elationship. We have always blamed all our ills on West and USA. We never understood anything about Cold War. We recently saw our hue and cry about F16 sale but where is the similar call of Russian Ambassador of Russia by MEA. I for one even wonder if MEA even realise the deep relationship between those tow partners.
It is our own misunderstanding that USA will take any action against Pakistn. If one looks with open eyes one can see that Pakistan serivce for more than6 decades have built true lobbying and close relationship with Pentagon.
Pakistan is well aware that she got away with not only hiding OBL and burning and looting of supply lines to Afghanistan and even were aware of IED and guidance of Taliban in Afghanistan and yet no action taken.
India does not have any friends not only in USA but around the world that Mumbai case could have been raised. We might think the rules of peace but world in rality is not so.
We have to become pragmatic and by crying over spilt milk will not work
Grow up and face what Pakistan is and will continue to deny or delay

Apple to replace faulty USB-C cables
New York : US tech giant Apple has announced a worldwide replacement programme for the USB-C cable that it shipped between April and June, 2015.
 
The cable was released with the 12-inch Retina Macbook last year, and according to Apple, it is possible for the cable to fail without warning due to flaw in the design.
 
"As a result, your MacBook may not charge or only charge intermittently when it's connected to a power adapter with an affected cable," iClarified quoted Apple's statement as saying on Saturday.
 
The buyers of these cables may get a new cable if they gave Apple their mailing address when registering for MacBook.
 
Others can contact authorised Apple service provider, or contact Apple customer support.
 
If any user has bought a new one, he/she is eligible for a refund.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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India Inc urges new technology to transform manufacturing
Mumbai : Indian industry leaders on Sunday stressed the need to bring in new technology into the country's manufacturing, rather than depend solely on cheap labour, to make the Make In India initiative a success.
 
"There will be migration of large-scale low cost factories from China to India. But that shouldn't be the only manufacturing India does," Mahindra & Mahindra chairman Anand Mahindra said at the CNN Asia Business Forum held as part of the ongoing Make India India Week here.
 
"Is there going to be a disruption in the way we 'Make in India'. Manufacturing should be democratised and decentralised," he said.
 
"India has a track record of seting up world class cement, textile factories and oil refineries. We have to take India to the next level," said Kumar Mangalam Birla, chairman of the Aditya Birla Group.
 
"New skills such as use of algorithm remote sensing must be used in manufacturing to remain constantly contemporary," he said.
 
"We as a country are highly innovative. It is part of our DNA," added Birla.
 
Describing India as a "highly innovative place," American multinational General Electric's South Asia chief executive, Banmali Agrawala, said: "We're pressing the pedal on getting digital."
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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