Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Why life is unfair for the WTF organization (The Funny Side)
Sometimes I feel The Universe hates me. On the morning of writing this, I found my Fitbit step-counter hadn't re-charged, which meant that I was trapped in bed for an hour.
 
But even more cursed by destiny, I reckon, are the folk at the World Taekwondo Federation, known as WTF. For years, everything was fine and then along came the Internet and now everything they do sounds ridiculous.
 
Trophies emblazoned with WTF make people laugh, cheerleading chants ("Yay, WTF!") sound absurd, and any kind of slogan looks silly: "Don't say Taekwondo, say WTF!"
 
Now WTF boss Hoss Rafaty is giving up the battle and urging members to ditch the acronym and just say "World Taekwondo". I heard about this from sports-mad reader Allen Chiang, so I canvassed regular contributors to share tales of other innocent organizations with names that were overtaken by circumstances.
 
First up was Grexit, a US software company who were proud they had invented a new word. But "Grexit" became a political term in Europe and the nerds were soon driven mad by people wanting to discuss Greek politics. Nerds know a lot about computers but almost nothing about complex issues of Real Life, such as politics, society, putting buttons in the right holes, etc.
 
Then there were the many firms who have been harmed by the inability of Internet addresses to include spaces, punctuation or capital letters. Experts Exchange had a clear enough name, but its web address, expertsexchange, was read differently. The same thing happened when Pen Island became penisland, KeePass became keepass, Who Represents? became whorepresents, and Old Man's Haven became oldmanshaven. A company which recycles old information technology hardware called itself IT Scrap, but it became itscrap in the web version.
 
Web-surfers' preference for short forms was a problem, too, as was discovered by the South Korean pottery training company which found their web name constantly misunderstood: enjoypot.co.kr.
 
Perhaps the most ironic case of events overtaking honest intentions was the story of ISIS, which long stood for the International Society for Islamic Secularization, a group of people who are like most Muslims: modern, intelligent, lovely people. But now it's hard for members to even introduce themselves. "Hi, I'm from a Muslim group called ISIS and I-wait! I won't hurt you!"
 
Name changes can be awkward, too. Staff at Lakeview Typewriters in the US were happy with their business cards until the firm was bought by Allan Boring and they now work for Boring Business Systems (not a joke).
 
Office equipment makers in Sweden learned that their boss had decided to name their company after the Swedish word for "logic", which is "stolen", which is why tourists now stop in Stockholm to take pictures of the Stolen office goods store.
 
A financial reporter friend tells me that staff at the Third National Bank and the Fifth National Bank in the US had ordinary business cards until the two banks merged: "Now they work for the bizarrely named Fifth Third, which just sounds like bad math."
 
But there are occasional bright spots in this record of gloom. The European electricity firm PowerGen Italia became powergenitalia in the internet age. The reporter said: "I expect most of the male employees, anyway, think it is rather a nice thing to have on their business cards."
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Securitisation of loans key to develop small banks: Moody's
New Delhi : While non-banking finance companies (NBFCs) in India will continue to fund through securitisation, the practice of pooling of loans will be key for developing small finance banks, Moody's Investors Service said on Thursday.
 
"Securitisation will continue to be instrumental for these small Indian finance banks, as it will take time for them to develop a retail deposit franchise," the American agency said in a report here.
 
Securitisation involves pooling of financial assets or loans together to create a new security, which is then sold to investors.
 
"At the same time, NBFCs and MFIs (micro-finance institutions) will continue to fund through securitisation as the sector grows," Moody's said.
 
The Reserve Bank of India in September 2015 granted in-principle approval to 10 entities, including eight MFIs, to operate as small finance banks.
 
"With the aim of promoting financial inclusion to the under-served segment, the small finance banks will accept deposits and extend credit to marginal farmers and small business units. Their mandate overlaps with the target market of MFIs," the report added.
 
In both India and China, NBFCs are key providers of credit to individuals and small businesses that would otherwise have limited access to bank loans or would incur high interest for such loans, Moody's said.
 
"While there are various funding avenues open to the NBFCs in India and China, securitisation has proven to be reliable and competitively priced, and is therefore an important source of the funds the NBFCs use for lending," said Moody's assistant vice president Georgina Lee.
 
According to the US consultancy firm, the development of domestic securitisation markets will help both India and China achieve the objective of financial inclusion.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Sabarimala shrine rid of over 670 tonnes of waste
Pathanamthitta (Kerala) : A cleanliness drive at Sabarimala has rid the shrine of over 670 tonnes of organic and plastic waste left behind by pilgrims.
 
Pilgrims visiting the Sabarimala temple - dedicated to Lord Ayyappa and located on the river bank - believe that shedding clothes in the Pamba river helps them wash off their sins. However, the river is polluted in the process. 
 
The 60-day cleanliness drive called 'Mission Green Sabarimala' was launched by the Pathanamthitta district administration to keep the temple situated in the Periyar Tiger Reserve free of plastic and litter. 
 
During the campaign that concluded on Thursday, PET bottles and other plastic waste collected from Sabarimala and in and around the Pamba river were transported out by Chris Global firm. 
 
According to official sources, 622 tonnes of organic matter was collected by hundreds of volunteers and 800 cleaning staff from Sabarimala for incineration. 
 
Over 48 tonnes of plastic bottles were also collected during the two-month pilgrimage for recycling. About 35 million devotees visit the temple during the 60-day pilgrimage from November 15 to January 15.
 
Kudumbashree Mission volunteers, Kerala's largest women's self-help group, and forest department officials collected 1.8 tonnes of plastic through a road campaign whereby vehicles were intercepted to exchange plastic bags and bottles with environment-friendly cloth bags on the Pathanamthitta-Sabarimala route. 
 
Every pilgrim to the Sabarimala shrine leaves behind at least 250 gm plastic. Last year alone, 8,750 tonnes of plastic waste, including water bottles, food wrappers, use-and-throw raincoats, carry bags and the like were dumped in the area. The 1,500-year-old temple thus faces a major environmental threat.
 
Apart from Kerala government agencies like the Suchitwa Mission, 'Mission Green Sabarimala' is supported by Kudumbashree and corporates like Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Pvt. Ltd.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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