World
Volkswagen hit with Australian lawsuit over emissions scandal
 Troubled German carmaker Volkswagen has been hit with its first Australian class action lawsuit for selling vehicles that contained emissions defeating devices.
 
Bannister Law on Monday said it has filed two class actions against the German auto-giant in Australia's federal court which could amount to billions of dollars in financial compensation for the estimated 91,000 affected local cars, Xinhua news agency reported.
 
"In supplying cars containing the defeat device, the statutory guarantee was not complied with. If we're successful on that part of the claim, the customer may be entitled to a refund of the purchase," class principal Charles Bannister said in a statement.
 
Earlier in October, Volkswagen announced a recall of 91,000 Volkswagen and Audi automobiles, sold between 2008 and 2015 that have been caught up in the global diesel emissions-rigging scandal, putting it in line with the German head office's plans to start recalling up to 11 million diesel vehicles world-wide starting in January.
 
Volkswagen has suspended local sales of affected vehicles fitted with 1.6 or 2.0-liter EA189 diesel engines after talks with Australia's government over how it would deal with the problem.
 
Australian regulators are currently investigating the troubled auto-giant and have warned that the company faces millions of dollars in possible fines for breaking mandatory safety standards and misleading customers. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Low-fat diet won't make you slimmer in long term: Study

The results are based on an analysis of past studies involving more than 68,000 adults

 

Having low-fat diet does not lead to greater weight loss in the long term compared to higher-fat diets of similar intensity, says a Lancet study.
 
The results are based on analysis of past studies involving more than 68,000 adults.
 
"Behind current dietary advice to cut out the fat, which contains more than twice the calories per gram of carbohydrates and protein, the thinking is that simply reducing fat intake will naturally lead to weight loss. But our robust evidence clearly suggests otherwise,” said lead author Deirdre Tobias from Harvard Medical School, Boston, US.
 
Tobias and colleagues did a systematic review and analysis of all randomised trials comparing the effectiveness of low-fat diets to other diets, including no diet, at improving long-term weight loss (at least one year) in non-pregnant adults up to the end of July 2014.
 
Analysis of 53 studies involving 68,128 adults showed no difference in the average weight loss between reduced-fat diets and higher-fat diets.
 
Indeed, reduced-fat diets only led to greater weight loss when compared with no diet at all, and resulted in less weight loss compared with low-carbohydrate interventions, although differences in weight change were small.
 
"The science does not support low-fat diets as the optimal long-term weight loss strategy,” Tobias noted.
 
"To effectively address the obesity epidemic, we will need more research to identify better approaches for long-term weight loss and weight maintenance, including the need to look beyond differences in macronutrient composition--the proportion of calories that come from fat, carbohydrate, and protein,” Tobias explained.
 
The study was published in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 
 

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SC firm on environment levy collection from 1st November

The court had said that charge would be collected by the toll operators without any deduction and handed over to the Delhi government on every Friday

 

The collection of environment compensation charge (ECC) from commercial vehicles entering Delhi from 127 entry points will commence from midnight of October 31 as the Supreme Court refused on Friday to postpone the date from November 1 to December 1.
 
A bench of Chief Justice H.L. Dattu and Justice Amitava Roy, while directing hearing of the plea by toll collector SMYR Consortium Ltd seeking postponement of the toll collection from November 1 to December 1, said that the collections would commence from November 1 as directed earlier on October 9.
 
Appearing for SMYR Consortium Ltd, senior counsel Shyam Divan urged the court to postpone the collection citing difficulties that needed to be sorted out before commencing work.
 
SMYR Consortium Ltd collects toll on behalf of three of Delhi's civic bodies on 125 entry point except for Badarpur and NOIDA toll.
 
However, Additional Solicitor General Tushar Mehta, appearing for North Delhi Municipal Corporation, opposed the plea for postponement saying the collection of ECC was for larger public good and could not be postponed for some difficulties of SMYR Consortium Ltd.
 
In an attempt to curb the commercial vehicles contributing to the already alarming air pollution, the apex court had on October 12 imposed an ECC of Rs.700 on light vehicles and 2 axle trucks and Rs.1,300 on 3 and 4 axle trucks entering the national capital in the course of their onward journey.
 
The ECC that would be imposed for four months on experimental basis would come into force from November 1 and would remain in force till February 29.
 
The court had said that charge would be collected by the toll operators without any deduction and handed over to the Delhi government on every Friday.
 
The amount so collected ought to be exclusively used for augmenting public transport and improving roads, particularly for most vulnerable users, that is, cyclists and pedestrians in Delhi, the court order had said.
 
The order had come as the court noted that about 23 percent of the commercial vehicles and 40-60 percent of the heavy trucks entering Delhi were not destined for Delhi, and were only enttering the city to avoid the alternative NH 71 and NH 71A connecting Rewari to Panipat via Jhajjar and Rohtak as they are toll roads.
 
Passenger vehicles and ambulances, vehicles carrying essential commodities like food stuffs and oil tankers entering Delhi would be exempted from paying ECC.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 
 

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