Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Vitamin D may help treat age-related diseases
The researchers reviewed evidence that suggests an association between Vitamin D deficiency and chronic diseases associated with aging such as cognitive decline, depression, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and cancer
 
The sunshine vitamin can be of great help for people during their sunset years as it may play a vital role in the prevention and treatment of diseases associated with ageing, says a study.
 
The researchers reviewed evidence that suggests an association between Vitamin D deficiency and chronic diseases associated with aging such as cognitive decline, depression, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and cancer.
 
These findings were published in the Journal of Aging and Gerontology.
 
"Vitamin D deficiency is a common, serious medical condition that significantly affects the health and well-being of older adults," said one of the authors Sue Penckofer, professor at Loyola University Chicago Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing (MNSON).
 
When the sun shines on our skin, the skin produces Vitamin D. A diet rich in Vitamin D or the intake of Vitamin D supplements can also cover our need to some extent.
 
Older adults are at risk for Vitamin D deficiency due to diet, reduced time outdoors and poor skin absorption of the nutrient.
 
"Better understanding the relationship between Vitamin D and chronic diseases in older adults and whether treatment of Vitamin D deficiency can prevent or treat these disorders is important given the increasing number of people at risk for these health issues," researcher Meghan Meehan from MNSON said.
 
The Institute of Medicine generally recommends that adults up to 70 years of age take 600 IU of Vitamin D daily and adults over the age of 70 consume 800 IU of the nutrient daily.
 
As the older population continues to grow, universal guidelines for testing and treating Vitamin D deficiency are needed, the study authors concluded.
 
"Research to examine the proper dosing of Vitamin D supplements necessary to prevent the chronic diseases of aging also would have significant benefit for future generations," they added.
 

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Will US Fed raise interest rates?
The Wall Street Journal suggested that the Fed "is about to inject uncertainty back into financial markets after spending years trying to calm investors' nerves with explicit assurances that interest rates would remain low"
 
The US central bank kicked off a policy meeting that ends Wednesday amid speculation about when the Federal Reserve will raise US interest rates - a move that would impact both advanced and emerging markets like India.
 
The Wall Street Journal suggested that the Fed "is about to inject uncertainty back into financial markets after spending years trying to calm investors' nerves with explicit assurances that interest rates would remain low."
 
US Federal Reserve Chairperson Janet Yellen is expected to announce its decision at a press conference Wednesday afternoon (midnight India time) at the end of the two-day meeting of Federal Open Market Committee's (FOMC).
 
Investors are monitoring whether or not the word "patient" remains in the text as an indication of when short-term interest rates might go up. "In theory, less-clear-cut interest-rate guidance from the Fed should lead to more volatility in financial markets," the Journal said.
 
"That's because investors will be left less certain about a key variable in every asset-valuation model: the cost of funds," it said.
 
USA Today also suggested that "the Fed is likely to drop a promise to be patient as it weighs interest rate hikes, clearing a path for an increase as early as June based on recent Fed guidance."
 
The Fed's benchmark rate has been near zero since the 2008 financial crisis, which has helped fuel the six-year bull market.
 
Meanwhile, after a strong start to the week, stocks ended mostly lower Tuesday as investors waited for clues on when the Fed may begin raising rates.
 
Ahead of the Fed meeting, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde warned Tuesday that emerging markets like India must prepare for the impact of a rise in US interest rates.
 
In a speech at Reserve Bank of India in Mumbai, she also warned that markets could be heading for a repeat of the 2013 "taper tantrum."
 
At that time stocks fell and interest rates rose around the world as the Fed considered winding down its "quantitative easing" bond-buying programme.
 
"I am afraid this may not be a one-off episode," Lagarde said. "The timing of interest-rate liftoff and the pace of subsequent rate increase can still surprise markets."
 

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What’s not

Steel companies were punished. Sesa Sterlite, Prakash Industries, SAL Steel and Tata Steel declined 11%, 10%, 9% and 8%, respectively. Steel Authority of India and Uttam Value Steels fell 6% and 5%, respectively.

 

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