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Schedule 23 of the annual report for FY15-16 consisting of employee benefit expenses has the...

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Moneylife Foundation launches 12-week programme on 'Police & You'
"Citizens have to play an important and active role to make sure you get the best from the government. This 12-week program is a right step in bringing together police force and public. This will help citizens to understand their rights," said Julio Ribeiro, the former Commissioner of Police, Mumbai, and India’s first “super cop”. Mr Ribeiro launched the 12-week programme, "The Police & You" in Mumbai on Wednesday, the first of which was attended by more than 150 people today.
 
Moneylife Foundation with Police Reforms Watch & Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative and with support from Saraswat Bank has launched the 12-week program that aims to spread knowledge about protecting yourself, your rights, the Indian Penal Code (IPC), cybercrime and economic offences.  
 
Mr Ribeiro said, "Today we can use RTI and other instruments to get justice. But remember, you need to raise your voice whenever there is injustice. Some NGOs are doing good work in that area. In fact, I doubt if there would be justice without such NGOs."
 
The event was held in the well-appointed auditorium of Saraswat Bank headquarters, Eknath Thakur Bhavan. Speaking on the occasion, Gautam Thakur, Vice Chairman of Saraswat Bank said, "I have a big soft corner for anyone in uniform, be it the police or the military. My father Eknath Thakur always used to say that India is the only country, which does not respect bravery. During his lifetime he made sure bravehearts are honoured whenever possible. After the Mumbai terror attack, he met families of the martyrs and many of the kin of these martyrs are employed by Saraswat Bank. With these principles of my father, it was natural for me to offer any help to Moneylife Foundation for this wonderful initiative to inform citizens about civil defence and police force."
 
Introducing the concept behind the 12-week programme, Dolphy A D'souza, Convenor of 
Police Reforms Watch said, "We have worked together on the program for each week and we hope this series will make citizens aware about their right and duties".
 
The inaugural session on "Role of citizens Disaster Management Flood & Cyclone" was conducted by SB Bagat, DD Gharat and BS Pagdhare from the Directorate of Civil Defence of Maharashtra Govt. Shivajirao B Bhagat, a gold medallist in Disaster management training with 32 years of experience, conducted the session and started by providing some background about the role of civil defence in society and the various kinds of training programmes that the directorate conducts.
 
He said that managing a disaster requires proper planning and constant monitoring. This includes identification of disaster, vulnerability analysis, hazard analysis, risk analysis, resource analysis, and control measures like awareness building, warning systems, action plans and procedures.
 
In most disasters one comes across certain common types of problems like, building collapse, people trapped or injured, people becoming homeless, breakdown of communication including accessibility to the site of disaster, animals dead or injured, hygiene and sanitation problems, and breakdown of law and order.
 
In such cases, the response should have teams for rescue, first aid, ambulance, firefighting, welfare, veterinary, communication as well as police and paramilitary forces, including home guards, the officials from the CDO said.
 
Citing some examples, like the 1993 Latur earthquake, he said that there was no contingency plan, no traffic control, no briefing to police personnel, and no coordination among various authorities and agencies.
 
Earlier, it had a significant role to play in managing civil issues during war time, but these days it plays a prominent role in disaster management. Since 1968 more than thirty thousand civil defence volunteers had been trained for emergency causes, said Mr Bagat. 
 
He took the audience through Civil defence has classified into two divisions namely man-made disasters and natural disasters. The man-made disasters were  classified into gaseous disaster, biological, acid related disaster, that caused by effluents, nuclear  disaster, fire, sabotage and explosive devices .The natural disasters were classified into flood, cyclone and earthquakes.
 
 
Mr Bagat enthralled the audience by showing some simple knots that are used in rescue-related work or to climb out of dangerous situations. He also explained as to what people should do to protect themselves and to minimise damage in different situations such as an earthquake or a blast — for instance, he said people should quickly lie down with elbows on the ground protecting the heart from possible shock, fingers in the ear and heads down when faced with a sudden bomb blast. Ideally, clenching a handkerchief in the mouth also protects a person from the effects of shock. This protects people because the shrapnel usually scatters at a 30-degree angle away from the ground. Similarly, when faced with toxic gas, he said the gas usually rises to higher levels, so lying on the ground acts as a protection.  Since cloud bursts and flooding have begun to occur all over the city, the presentation included a film which showed how bottles and everyday use containers can be quickly converted into floatation devices to save oneself.

 

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COMMENTS

Jyoti Dua

7 months ago

Kudos to Moneylife Foundation for taking such social issues. The Police & You, is an excellent subject to bridge gap between police and public. The idea of using volunteer senior citizens for Disaster Management and Community Security be considered.

Nifty, Sensex overbought but are being supported by a benign macro environment – Wednesday closing report
We had mentioned in Tuesday’s closing report that Nifty, Sensex lack momentum. The major indices of the Indian stock markets rallied on Wednesday and closed with gains of around 0.45% over Tuesday’s close. The trends of the major indices in the course of Wednesday’s trading are given in the table below:
 
 
Positive European indices and US premarket futures buoyed the Indian equity markets on Wednesday, as healthy buying was witnessed in healthcare, oil and gas, and capital goods stocks. On the NSE, there were 965 advances, 448 declines and 61 unchanged at the close of Wednesday’s trading.
 
The European Union (EU) downgraded its economic outlook for Britain and the rest of the bloc on Tuesday, saying the Brexit vote ushered in uncertainty and would weigh on growth. The gross domestic product (GDP) growth in the 19-country eurozone is expected to slow to between 1.3% and 1.5% in 2016 from the previously estimated 1.7% in May. The same growth figures are expected for next year. This implies a loss of GDP of 0.25% to 0.5% by 2017, which is less than in Britain (1.0% to 2.75%), said a report published by the European Commission, the bloc's executive arm.  "The UK's 'leave' vote is expected to slow private consumption and investment and impact on foreign trade," it noted. The report warned that Britain's referendum had created an "extraordinarily uncertain situation," which is likely to prevail for some time, and would affect not only Britain but also the rest of the EU economy through several transmission channels, mainly uncertainty, investment, trade, and migration. These issues are likely to have a bearing on the investments by foreign institutional investors in emerging markets like India.
 
The government has not allowed any pharmaceutical company to increase prices of drugs beyond permissible limits, parliament was told on Tuesday. "Few companies have given representations for increasing prices of medicines beyond permissible limits mentioning various reasons like increase in cost, tax, foreign exchange rates etc. However, no company has been given permission to increase the prices so far," Minister of Chemicals and Fertilisers Ananth Kumar told the Lok Sabha. He said the government has brought down prices of 404 medicines under the National List of Essential Medicines, 2015 (revised schedule-I) of the Drug Price Control Order (DPOC) 2013. The government has earlier "reduced the ceiling prices of 530 medicines as on 2/3/2016 under NLEM 2011 of DPCO 2013 (original schedule-I) on the basis of the negative wholesale price index," he said. Schedule I of DPCO 2013 contains the national list of essential medicines. The S & P BSE Healthcare index closed at 16450.18, up 2.38% on Wednesday on the BSE.
 
The top gainers and top losers of the major indices are given in the table below:
 
 
The closing values of the major Asian indices are given in the table below:
 
 

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