Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
'Villages on the Moon' can be reality by 2030: Scientists
New York : Villages on the Moon, constructed through cooperation between astronauts and robotic systems on the lunar surface, can become a reality as early as 2030, a group of scientists has predicted.
 
Scientists are exploring the idea of "moon villages" that can serve as a potential springboard for future human missions to Mars and potentially other deeper space missions.
 
In order for that vision to become a reality, scientists must first determine if the resources on the Moon are as significant as we think they are.
 
"We keep talking about lunar resources but we still need to demonstrate they can be used a (that) they are, in fact, reserves," said Clive Neal, a planetary geologist from the University of Notre Dame in the US.
 
The ground truth verification of deposit size, composition, form and homogeneity requires a coordinated prospecting programme as a first step.
 
"The next step would demonstrate extraction techniques followed by refinement of the product into usable commodity. A successful programme would then clearly demonstrate that lunar resources can enable solar system exploration," he said.
 
Neal's research explores the origin and evolution of the Moon, focusing on the petrology and geochemistry of returned samples coupled with geophysics and other remotely sensed datasets.
 
It looks at the geophysical instrumentation and investigations of the Moon, formation of impact melts, and more basalt petrogenesis.
 
In this regard, the European Space Agency (ESA) hosted a symposium titled "Moon 2020-2030 -- A New Era of Coordinated Human and Robotic Exploration", in the Netherlands recently.
 
According to Neal, who attended the conference, the ESA meeting highlighted technology development in terms of precision landing, robotic sample return, and cryogenic sampling, caching, return and curation.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Smartphones to turn into pancreas, treat Type 1 diabetes
New York : US researchers have developed a system that treats Type 1 diabetes automatically and effortlessly -- with the help of a smartphone -- ditching constant finger pricks and manual insulin injections.
 
Combined with a tiny sensor and wearable insulin pump, a smartphone can stand in for a pancreas, automatically monitoring blood-sugar levels and delivering insulin as needed, Ars Technica published citing the researchers' report.
 
"We have been working on this specific artificial pancreas as it is called since 2006. We show that it is not only possible, but it can run on a smartphone," lead researcher Boris Kovatchev, director of the Centre for Diabetes Technology in the US University of Virginia, said.
 
The system works with a readily available pen drive-sized blood-glucose sensor that can be worn in a variety of places on the body, such as an arm, leg, or the abdomen.
 
The sensor reads blood-glucose levels every five minutes and wirelessly reports the results to a specially designed app on a nearby android smartphone.
 
The app's algorithm analyses the data and wirelessly controls a discreet, wearable insulin pump, which can be hooked to a belt or other piece of clothing. The pump has a very fine needle that delivers insulin into the blood stream.
 
"If it is working, you do not know that it is there," Francis Doyle III, dean of Harvard's Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, who is collaborating with Kovatchev on the system, said.
 
Together, the "closed-loop" system should act much like a home thermostat, automatically sensing and adjusting the temperature to match preset targets.
 
The ultimate goal is to make managing Type 1 diabetes effortless and automatic, easing the daily lives of the 1.25 million people who suffer from the disease, Doyle said.
 
The system, backed by a $12.6 million grant from the US National Institutes of Health, will enter two final phases of international trials this year that will take place at various clinics in the US, France, Italy, and the Netherlands.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Tame selfie craze, treat selfies as fun activity: Experts
New Delhi : If the disturbing news of two selfie deaths - one each in Mumbai and Jammu and Kashmir this weekend - shattered your Sunday morning, it is time to pause and see if your young ones are not trying a dangerous pose for a selfie to impress their peers.
 
A college girl who fell into the swirling Arabian Sea while clicking a selfie off a rocky part of the Mumbai beach and a youth who plunged into the water to save her on Saturday were both swept away, police said.
 
And in Jammu and Kashmir's Reasi district, an attempt to take a selfie atop a fort proved fatal for a youth as he fell backwards and died, police said.
 
“There have been cases where youngsters have put themselves at unnecessary risk to take that one good picture. It is crucial that you draw a line between habit and obsessive behaviour,” Dr Ashish Mittal, consultant psychiatry at Columbia Asia Hospital in Gurgaon, told IANS.
 
In November, a 14-year old schoolboy, who was trying to take a selfie on his cellphone atop a stationary train wagon, was electrocuted and died in Mumbai.
 
“Parents should intervene as it is no more a laughing matter. Their 'selfie crazy' children may require expert help. Else, they may put their lives at risk for a mere picture,” he added.
 
The craze for a perfect selfie shot has taken many young lives globally in the past year.
 
In neighbouring Pakistan, a 22-year-old man was killed while trying to take a selfie in front of a moving train in Rawalpindi city in December.
 
In the same month, two teenagers were killed in Turkey after they lay on the middle of a road to try for a selfie with a plane in the background.
 
In another tragic instance, a 17-year-old schoolboy fell from the roof of a nine-storey building while trying to click an “extreme selfie” in Russia in September last year.
 
“Not only in India but worldwide, people should be careful for taking selfies in dangerous situations. The habit needs to be discouraged,” added Dr (Brig) S. Sudarsanan, senior consultant (Psychiatrist), at BLK Super Specialty Hospital in the capital.
 
Ironically, clicking a selfie proved to be more lethal than getting mauled by a shark in 2015.
 
There were at least 12 selfie-related deaths globally while only eight people died in shark attacks in 2015, tech website Mashable reported.
 
Alarmed by the growing number of selfie deaths, Russian police recently started a campaign called “Safe Selfies” - to guide how to be responsible selfie-takers.
 
According to Dr Samir Parikh, director (mental health and behavioural science) at Fortis Hospitals in New Delhi, education and guidance are useful for any novel or upcoming phenomena like selfie and selfie sticks.
 
“Taking precautions while taking selfies can be beneficial in order to ensure more informed and responsible decisions associated with social learning,” Parikh told IANS.
 
“We all are familiar with the craze of selfies, especially among youngsters. But if someone is taking a selfie in a dangerous situation like on a mountain or in the middle of the road, it can lead to fatal accidents,” noted Dr Mittal.
 
“Also, if someone's selfie is not liked by friends on social media, it can lead to further stress and frustration. This can turn into obsessive behaviour if not taken seriously,” he emphasised.
 
According to experts, it is the right time to tame selfie obsession.
 
“Do not succumb to peer pressure. Be smart enough to draw the line as at the end of the day, it is just a picture,” Dr Mittal advised. Consult an expert if needed. “Treat selfies only as a fun activity," Dr Sudarsanan added.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

MG Warrier

1 year ago

We may not be able to retrieve the new generation from ‘selfie culture’. But, like many other ‘negative’ things we have come through, like alcohol, smoking, drugs etc(list is illustrative, not exhaustive) and at some stage wanted to create social awareness about the harm they can cause, time has come when we should be openly debating the social problems ‘mobile technology’ is creating. There are several dimensions. There was a time when photography was prohibited in several places. We may not be able to go back in time. But, definitely, there is a case to think of imposing some self-regulation in the use of mobiles and web cams. Most important concern is about the security of the user. Use of such gadgets while driving, walking on or across roads etc. should be discouraged.

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