Stocks
Using Western BP guidelines may up stroke risk in Asian patients
European and North American blood pressure guidelines, issued last year, may actually increase the stroke risk if adapted for Asian patients, particularly the elderly, experts have warned.
 
High blood pressure is a key risk factor for stroke, but the link between the two is much stronger in Asians than it is in Europeans or North Americans, the authors wrote on an expert opinion published online in the journal Heart Asia.
 
"Although evidence-based and qualified guidelines have been recently released from Europe and North America, the unique features of Asian hypertensive patients raise concerns on the real clinical applicability of these guidelines to Asian populations," the authors noted.
 
The latest Western guidelines increased target blood pressure to 140/90 mmHg (millimeters of mercury - the units used to measure blood pressure) for patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease and renal failure, but this may be too high for Asian populations, warned Paolo Verdecchia from Hospital of Assisi in Italy, and colleagues.
 
Some Asian guidelines have recommended more stringent targets in these patients, they pointed out.
 
High blood pressure among Asian populations has unique features in terms of the response to drug treatment, risk of complications, and outcomes.
 
This leads to disproportionately high rates of death and ill health from stroke compared with Western populations, the authors pointed out.
 
The global number of people with poorly controlled high blood pressure has risen from 600 million in 1980 to almost 1 billion in 2008, and predicted to rise a further 60 percent to 1.56 billion by 2025.
 
The prevalence of high blood pressure in Asian countries has risen sharply in the past 30 years, and particularly over the past decade, as a result of increasing urbanisation and the adoption of a Western lifestyle, the researchers explained.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 

User

Pot belly now common among Indians on low incomes too
Traditionally thought to be a mark of prosperity, obesity is no longer confined to the rich in India. A new research has found that more than one in four middle-aged Indians on low and middling incomes now have an unhealthy midriff bulge.
 
The study published in the online journal BMJ Open showed that women are more likely to carry a spare tyre.
 
Fuelled, in part, by India's rapid economic growth in recent years, obesity has trickled down to all levels of society, the researchers said.
 
"Population based promotion of appropriate lifestyles, with special emphasis on women, is required to counteract prosperity driven obesity before it becomes too entrenched and expensive to uproot," the study said.
 
The study was authored by Sudipta Samal and Ambarish Dutta from Asian Institute of Public Health, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, and Pinaki Panigrahi from the University of Nebraska Medical Centre, Omaha, Nebraska, US.
 
The findings are based on a nationally representative survey of more than 7,000 people in 2010 from six Indian states: Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Assam, Maharashtra, and Karnataka.
 
The survey, which included measurements of height, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure, was part of the international Study on global Ageing and adult health , and involved only those aged 50 and above.
 
Most of the participants either had no paid job or lived on traditional subsistence or unskilled labour. 
 
Analysis of the data showed that in all, 14 percent of the sample were overweight, while more than one in three (35 percent) had a midriff bulge, defined as a waist circumference of more than 90 cm for men and more than 80 cm for women.
 
Women were particularly prone to central adiposity, with more than two thirds of those among the most affluent and almost half of those on low to middling incomes carrying an unhealthy spare tyre.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Cipla infringing Roche's patent in lung cancer drug: HC
In a setback to Cipla, the Delhi High Court on Friday held that the Indian drug major was infringing Swiss pharmaceutical company Hoffman-La Roche's patent in lung cancer drug erlotinib hydrochloride, sold under the name of Tarceva.
 
A division bench of Justice Pradeep Nandrajog and Justice Mukta Gupta held that Cipla's lung cancer medicine, Erlocip, was one polymorphic form of the compound, which may exist in several forms.
 
"This (the patent) is a sufficiently broad claim that is clearly not limited to any polymorphic version of erlotinib hydrochloride, but to erlotinib hydrochloride itself. This compound may exist in several polymorphic forms, but any and all such forms will be subsumed within this patent. 
 
"Therefore as Cipla's Erlocip is admittedly one particular polymorphic form of the erlotinib hydrochloride compound (polymorph B), it will clearly infringe the IN 774 patent (of Roche)," said the court.
 
It added: "We thus conclude this issue by noting that the single judge's finding that 'Tarceva' and 'Erlocip' were based on the polymorph B version of erlotinib hydrochloride, though correct factually, is irrelevant to the subject matter of the present patent as Cipla has clearly infringed Claim 1 of Roche's IN 774 patent in arriving at the said polymorph." 
 
The court's order came on the pleas of Cipla and Roche, both of which had challenged the September 7, 2012 order of a single judge, who had held that Cipla was not infringing Roche's patent and refused to grant any injunction against the Indian company. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)