Citizens' Issues
US FDA Looks to Redefine the Term 'Healthy' on Food Labels
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been doing some soul searching of late over key marketing terms popular in food advertising. Last fall it reached out to consumers to ask whether the agency should define “natural.” Now it is looking at another term prominent on many food labels that seeks to attract nutrition-conscious consumers: “healthy.” 
 
Under the current FDA definition, a food must be very low in fat to be marketed as healthy. But there are good fats – like those contained in nuts, avocados and salmon—as the KIND snack company argued after the agency ordered it to stop using the term because some of its bars exceeded the saturated fat limit. And what about foods high in sugar? Why are they allowed to be labelled healthy, KIND questioned the agency.
 
The FDA, noting that dietary recommendations have evolved, relented saying KIND could continue to label the bars “healthy” and signalled it will not enforce the current requirements if certain nutritional criteria are met. Meanwhile, companies can, at least for now, still use the term healthy on foods that meet the FDA’s current definition.
 
Here are a few whose “healthy” claims should be taken with, ahem, a grain of salt.
 
 
 
 
 
Consumers can weigh in on how they think the FDA should define “healthy” by submitting electronic comments here.
 
Find more of our coverage on food labelling terminology here
 

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COMMENTS

Anil Kumar

7 months ago

Good article!

Now, replacement Samsung Note 7 catches fire on US plane
Samsung woes over its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone are far from over it appears. Now, a replacement Note 7 device reportedly caught fire on a US flight, leading to cancellation of the flight after evacuation.
 
According to The Verge, Southwest Airlines flight 994 from Louisville to Baltimore was evacuated on Wednesday during the boarding process after a smoked Note 7 was spotted.
 
"All passengers and crew exited the plane via the main cabin door and no injuries were reported," the report said, quoting a Southwest Airlines spokesperson.
 
Brian Green who bought the new Note 7 from an AT&T store on September 21, had turned off his phone after the flight attendant call and all of a sudden, the device began to smoke.
 
Green immediately dropped the phone to the floor of the cabin.
 
According to Green, the phone was letting off a "thick grey-green angry smoke." The phone had burnt through the carpet and "scorched the subfloor of the plane".
 
"A photograph of the box shows the black square symbol that indicates a replacement Note 7 and Green said it had a green battery icon," The Verge reported, adding that Green has now bought an Apple iPhone 7.
 
According to Green, the phone was at around 80 per cent of battery capacity when the incident occurred.
 
Samsung later issued a statement: "Until we are able to retrieve the device, we cannot confirm that this incident involves the new Note7. We are working with the authorities and Southwest now to recover the device and confirm the cause. Once we have examined the device we will have more information to share."
 
Green's Note 7 was now with the Louisville Fire Department for investigation.
 
India's civil aviation regulator last week lifted the restrictions on in-flight use of the new Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone -- but only those purchased after September 15.
 
On September 9, the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) had prohibited the use of the high-end smartphone on-board aircraft.
 
The DGCA said the usage restrictions have only been lifted for mobile phones purchased after September 15. Restrictions still continue for Note 7s purchased before that date.
 
The select type of Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone allowed to be used on-board have a green battery charge indication on their screen.
 
A Samsung India spokesperson said: "It is important to note that Samsung has not sold a single unit of Galaxy Note7 in India so far. The 'green battery icon' will apply to all Galaxy Note7 units that will be sold to customers in India when it is launched."
 
Samsung has recalled its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone over battery overheating issues globally.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
  

 

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'Surgical strike' needed on dengue, chikungunya
The "surgical strike" on the terror launch pads across the Line of Control in Jammu and Kashmir has been considered a mature and unrivalled move by the Indian Army. For a country that is able to handle terrorists brilliantly, shouldn't handling mosquitoes be only child's play?
 
What is quite evident in the current scenario in which there is an outbreak of chikungunya and dengue in Delhi is the need to control the virulent spread of vector-borne diseases. chikungunya, which is derived from Swahili and means "that which contorts or bends up" calls for immediate deliberation by the government machinery to set things straight.
 
The potency with which the virus is being transmitted vividly indicates the apathy and inefficiency of the state in containing the breeding of the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Aedes aegypti most likely originated in Africa; since then, the mosquito has been transported throughout the tropical, sub-tropical and parts of the temperate world through global trade and shipping activities.
 
This mosquito has also been associated with yellow fever, dengue and zika. In fact, the symptoms of chikungunya are almost similar to those of dengue and zika.
 
A national newspaper recently reported that 12,255 cases of chikungunya have been reported in the country until August 31, 2016, -- a little less than half of what was reported in all of 2015. There have been 27,879 cases of dengue and 60 deaths because of dengue haemorrhagic fever. The year 2015 had seen 99,913 dengue cases with 220 deaths.
 
Health Secretary C.K. Mishra had, in a statement, noted that the chikungunya situation may be at the peak of a seven-to-eight-year cycle, but the disease causes less casualties than dengue and there is a dire need to focus on symptomatic treatment and prevention. It is essential for the community to come together to represent to the healthcare provider to visit the areas where chikungunya is rampant so as to carry out fogging measures.
 
If one transmits the disease following recent travel, it is important to keep the health officials informed so that they could engage in preventing its spread. It is not just about tackling the disease, it is also important to prevent it.
 
The health department should necessarily be on double-duty working to suppress the mosquito population. There is research that indicates that no method has yet been found that will eradicate mosquitoes beyond the short term of a few days. Despite the fact that some products promise to work, preventing the breeding of mosquitoes is a continuous process.
 
As in the West, it is important for the health officials to conduct surveillance to understand local populations of mosquitoes and begin control efforts. The prevention or reduction of transmission is completely dependent on the control of mosquito vectors and limiting person-mosquito contact. Though both dengue and chikungunya are national notifiable conditions, there is very little liaisoning between healthcare providers, local and state public health departments and vector-control specialists.
 
There is a need to organise area/community clean-up campaigns targeting disposable containers for source-reduction, including large objects that accumulate water (broken washing machines, refrigerators, toilets, flower pots, tyres, buckets) in houses, buildings and public areas. Female mosquitoes lay several hundred eggs on the walls of water-filled containers. Eggs stick to containers like glue and remain attached until they are scrubbed off. When water covers the eggs, they hatch and become adults in about a week.
 
So, once a week, empty and scrub, turn over, cover, or throw out items that hold water. Tightly cover water storage containers so that mosquitoes cannot get inside to lay eggs. As for homes, it is better to use screens on windows and doors; repair holes in screens and use air conditioning when available.
 
During a chikungunya or dengue virus outbreak, aggressive vector management and personal protection activities are required to effectively reduce mosquito density and prevent mosquitoes from feeding on infected people. This will help break the transmission cycle. So certainly, a partnership between the city and citizens will keep the numbers down as we head into cooler weather in the fall.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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