World
US contractor to pay $3.1 million penalty for illegal outsourcing to India
New York: An American contractor has agreed to pay New York State a penalty of $3.1 million for illegally outsourcing confidential work to India, state officials have announced.
 
The officials, however, cleared the Mumbai company, which was not identified, of any wrongdoing. The Indian company, which cooperated with the investigation, did not know that it obtained the work illegally and there was no evidence that it shared with anyone else or misused the personal information of 16 million people that was sent to it, officials said Thursday.
 
The action announced Tuesday on the case that goes back to 2008 hits two current areas of heightened concern in the US-outsourcing and cybersecurity. There is growing scrutiny of outsourcing, which has become a contentious issue across in the political spectrum in the presidential election campaigns. And there are serious concerns about the security of personal data because of cybercrimes.
 
"The agreement announced today sends a clear message: if you are a government contractor and you illegally ship jobs overseas, you will be held accountable," New York Attorney Gneral Eric T. Schneiderman said.
 
Focused Technologies Imaging Services (FTIS) admitted to sending the personal information it received from the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services to the Indian company, which was not authorized to receive the data, Schneiderman and Inspector General Leahy Scott said in a statement. It also admitted to violating a contract requirement to hire disabled people in the US to do half the work, they said.
 
The overall contract that FTIS had was for $3.4 million, but it paid the Indian company only $82,000 for 37.5 percent of the work, officials said.
 
The contract was for digitsing and indexing about 22 million fingerprint cards and creating a searchable database. The cards were of all state law enforcement officials, prisoners, parolees, and personnel undergoing background checks and included their dates of birth, identifying numbers and physical characteristics.
 
Because of sensitive nature of the information the contract required FTIS to do the digitisation in a warehouse in the state capital, Albany, using only employees who passed a criminal background check.
 
FTIS's current sole owner Charles Tobin, is responsible for $3.05 million of the penalty and former co-owner Julie Benware for $50,000. FTIS has also agreed to perform 69 percent of the work of certain contracts it gets within two years using disabled people.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Hated India, Indians since 1971: David Headley
Pakistani-American LeT terrorist-turned-approver David Coleman Headley said here on Friday that he nursed a hatred towards India and Indians since December 1971 when his school was bombed by Indian fighter planes during India-Pakistan war which saw the creation of Bangladesh.
 
"I have this hatred... towards Indian since December 7, 1971... When Indian planes had bombed my school... The school was destroyed and many people who worked there had died," Headley claimed on the third day of his ongoing cross-examination before Special Judge G. A. Sanap on Friday.
 
He was replying to the questions posed by lawyer Abdul Wahab Khan, the defence cousel for Zabiuddin Ansari alias Abu Jundal, one of the key plotters of the 26/11 Mumbai terror attacks.
 
Headley was referring to the bombing of his school during the India-Pakistan war which saw the dismemberment of East Pakistan that became Bangladesh.
 
The childhood incident when he was barely 10 years old left such an imprint on his tender mind that Headley decided to join the Lashkar-e-Taiba later to avenge the bombing of his school. 
 
He admitted that it was one of the reasons why he joined the LeT years later.
 
In another disclosure, Headley, 56, said he made attempt to organise a fund-raising programme for the Shiv Sena party and even invite the party's founder-patriarch, the late Bal Thackery to the US, but he had no plans to attack him there.
 
Incidentally, on February 12 he had revealed a plot to kill the late Bal Thackeray and on March 24 (Thursday) he spoke of an attack made on him (Thackeray) with the attacker caught but managed to escape from police custody.
 
Headley said that he was in touch with the then Shiv Sena Public Relations Officer Rajaram Rege whom he had earlier befriended in connection with the planned trip for the late Thackeray.
 
Though Headley never met the late Thackeray, he was open to inviting some other Sena leader after Rege informed that the senior Thackeray was old and unwell, he said.
 
Headley is being cross-examined by Khan via video-conferencing from an unknown location in the US where he is currently undergoing a 35-year jail sentence for the 26/11 and Denmark terror strikes.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Vijay Mallya quits as chairman Sanofi India

Mallya conveyed his decision not to seek re-election as a director at the company's ensuing Annual General Meeting, said the Sanofi statement 

 

Beleaguered business tycoon Vijay Mallya has decided to step down as the chairman of pharma major Sanofi India, nearly 33 years after he assumed the post, the company said in a statement here.
 
Mallya conveyed his decision not to seek re-election as a director at the company's ensuing Annual General Meeting, said the Sanofi statement issued late Wednesday.
 
Mallya had first joined in December 1973 as director of Sanofi India Ltd (SIL), then known as Hoechst Pharmaceuticals Ltd. He functioned as the board chairman since December 1983.
 
"I have been privileged to preside over the board of this company, which started as Hoechst Pharmaceuticals Ltd. and to have participated in its phenomenal growth and prosperity over such an extraordinarily long period of time," Mallya said in a farewell statement.
 
"It was gratifying that the company continued serving needy patients in India with world-class medication while ensuring consistent returns to all stakeholders."
 
Mallya, who is believed to be hiding in the United Kingdom, is wanted by the Enforcement Directorate (ED) in connection with a money-laundering case. The former liquor baron -- known as 'king of good times' -- has denied that he was "absconding", saying as an "international businessman" he is currently abroad on a business trip and was expected to return by March-end.
 
SIL Managing Director Shailesh Ayyangar said under Mallya's leadership, in the past 10 years, the company's sales grew from Rs.800 crore to Rs.2,000 crore, share price shot up from Rs.1,655 to Rs.4,358, market cap has almost tripled and the employee strength more than doubled from 1,500 to 3,700.
 
The SIL announced plans to induct Aditya Narayan and Usha Thorat as two new independent directors for five years from April 30, 2016. Subject to fulfilling all requirements, Aditya Narayan, 64, is slated to succeed Mallya as SIL Chairman.
 
SIL is listed on both BSE and NSE. Its parent Sanofi has 60.4 percent equity stake in SIL whose portfolio includes pharmaceuticals and consumer healthcare products.
 
In pharma, SIL has a strong presence in diabetes, being the only company with a balanced oral and insulin portfolio.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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