Technology
US aviation body warns against charging Samsung Note 7 on planes
Concerned over the growing battery explosion fears in Samsung's premium device Galaxy Note 7, the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a warning not to charge or switch on Note 7 on board aircraft.
 
"In light of recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices, the Federal Aviation Administration strongly advises passengers not to turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft and not to stow them in any checked baggage," the FAA said in a statement on Friday.
 
The strong warning came at a time when the south Korean giant is dealing with the global recall of nearly 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7 shipped so far across the world.
 
Three Australian airlines have already barred passengers from using or charging the smartphones during flights.
 
"Qantas and Virgin Australia have told passengers not to turn on Note 7 or charge them on flights," NBC News reported.
 
"On board announcements are being made prior to departure to inform all guests," Virgin Australia said in a statement.
 
An Australian man was left with burns when his Samsung smartphone "exploded" as he slept in his hotel room.
 
Tham Hua, from Victoria state who was visiting Western Australia, said his Samsung Galaxy Note 7 exploded in his hotel room, bursting into flames, Xinhua news agency reported on Wednesday.
 
"My brand new Note 7 exploded this morning while I was still asleep, it was plugged in and charging," Hua posted on a technology forum.
 
"Phone completely fried... (Samsung) told me this is the first case in Australia.
 
"(It) charred the hotel room bed sheet and the carpet when I whacked it down to the floor, burnt one of my fingers while doing that too."
 
Hua said the accident caused $1,300 worth of damage to his hotel room which Samsung offered to cover.
 
"Samsung Electronics Australia advises all customers who use a Galaxy Note 7 smartphone to power down their device, return it to its place of purchase and use an alternative device until a remedy can be provided," Samsung said in a statement.
 
As part of its global recall of Galaxy Note 7 after reports of battery explosion surfaced, Samsung Australia has formally recalled 51,060 such devices.
 
More than 35 cases of the exploding battery defect have been reported since the phone, which retails for $1,035, was launched on August 19.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Price, durability affecting new Apple Airpods sales
Although retailers have reported a surge in Apple's newly launched wireless headphones -- AirPods -- sales, the market has been dogged by concerns about the sound quality, price and durability of product, a media report said.
 
Analysts said that Apple has taken a "misstep" with some critics calling it "user-hostile" and wasteful.
 
"Analysts said that Apple is facing a battle to convince consumers to switch to wireless headphones after controversially scrapping the headphone jack on the new iPhone 7," The Guardian reported on Thursday.
 
On Wednesday, Apple launched its new iPhone without the headphone jack meaning iPhone 7 users must buy wireless headphones or use an adaptor to connect wired headphones to the battery port. 
 
The company will sell its own wireless headphones at $159.
 
"The loss of the headphone jack is likely to divide opinion. The pricey AirPod earphones are part style statement, part practicality but Apple just did not seem to land a persuasive justification for the bold move. The headphone adaptor helps bridge the gap, but suggests a lack of commitment to something touted as a courageous step," Ernest Doku, telecoms expert at price comparison service uSwitch, was quoted as saying.
 
"The removal of the headphone jack is, in our view, not much of an issue. The adaptor may make connecting traditional headphones fiddlier but for most consumers this will not be a significant barrier to purchase," Neil Saunders, chief executive of retail consultancy Conlumino, added.
 
The decision to scrap the traditional headphone socket has also prompted anger on social media and among analysts.
 
More than 300,000 people have signed an online petition criticising Apple for scrapping the headphone jack, claiming it will create "mountains of electronic waste" as people throw out their old headphones. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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