Urban inflation

Combined inflation for urban and rural areas declined to 3.66% in August 2015, from 3.69% in July. Inflation in urban areas declined to 2.67% in August from 2.94% in July, mainly due to a high base effect. Food inflation in urban areas declined to 1.71% in August from 1.89% in July. In urban areas, prices of vegetables fell 9.07% year-on-year, due to the base effect. Inflation related to fuel & power also remained steady in August, at around 3%. Inflation for housing, too, remained unaffected at around 4%. Inflation for clothing hovered around 4%; for miscellaneous items, it fell to 1.93% in August from 2.47% in July. 

User

Prolonged sitting as dangerous for heart as smoking
Have you ever considered how much you sit during a day while driving to work in the morning or during the eight-hour-a-day desk job or later, back home, unwinding on the couch in front of the television until you have your supper and hit the sack?
 
Of course, not to mention the dependence on emails and cellphone apps which help you to get your work done without having to go to the spot. Advancement of technology -- be it direct-deposit pay checks, online shopping and even the groceries that are now a click away -- were unthinkable a decade or two back.
 
What we seem to have forgotten is that any time you get the blood pumping and moving, it stimulates organs to do things that are healthier. 
 
A study quoted by a British newspaper states that for each hour a day that an adult spends sitting down during their lifetime, the likelihood of developing heart disease goes up by 14 percent.
 
Sitting could be as bad as smoking. And if you are involved in a job that requires you to sit for a prolonged period of time, then beware, you may be prone to cardiac ailments. In fact, inactivity is the fourth biggest killer of adults, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).
 
There have been several clinical records that have proved that sedentary lifestyle is detrimental to the human body. It results in obesity and has been cited as one of the main reasons for cancer as well. This is because a sedentary body goes into a storage mode and stops functioning as effectively as it should.
 
For women over 30 years of age, being a couch potato increases risk of heart-related problems as compared to those smoking or carrying extra weight. The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health conducted by University of Queensland has shown that sitting for hours and being inactive has been the main cause for cardiac issues among women.
 
Most often, people fail to realise that only daily gym sessions aren't sufficient to undo the damage caused by sitting for several hours. Scientists from the Medical College of Wisconsin tracked levels of activity of 2,031 adults whose average age was 50. They compared the number of hours each participant spent sitting down each day with the levels of deposits in blood vessels that act as signal for heart disease.
 
When we sit for long periods of time, enzyme changes occur in our muscles that can lead to increased blood sugar levels. The effects happen very quickly and regular exercise won't fully protect you.
 
Hence, it is recommended that you get up once an hour from your desk, even if it is just to walk around briefly or go to the bathroom. Some people have even started using treadmill desks at work -- anything that contracts our muscles and gets blood flowing. It dampens down inflammation and cuts down the risk of depositing plaque in the coronary arteries.
 
While too much sitting is just as dangerous as smoking -- and 30 to 60 minutes of exercise a day is not enough to reverse the effects, the good news is that a mere five minutes of movement every hour prevents health dangers.
 
The moral: Take a walk during lunch or talking on the phone, take the stairs instead of the elevator and use a pedometer to track your daily steps. If you have a sedentary job, do not go home and sit in front of the TV for hours in the night.
 
(Rajat Arora is an Interventional Cardiologist and Medical Director at Yashoda Hospitals in Delhi. The views expressed are personal. He can be contacted at [email protected])
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Flip-flop over Ankit Fadia as 'Digital India' ambassador
Prime Minister Narendra Modi's "Digital India" campaign has evoked yet another controversy -- this time over the appointment of a brand ambassador for the campaign.
 
Even as news was doing the rounds that self-proclaimed "ethical hacker" Ankit Fadia, 30, has been named brand ambassador for the campaign, a statement by the Department of Electronics and Information Technology denied any such claims.
 
"There were certain news reports that there is a move to appoint a brand ambassador for 'Digital India' programme of the government. This is to clarify that there has been no such move to appoint a brand ambassador as reported," it said.
 
Curiously, an hour after the post on the government's publicity web site, it was withdrawn.
 
"It was posted inadvertently by one of our officials without securing proper sanction. We will get back to you by evening with the actual position," a spokesperson for the department told IANS, when asked for a response.
 
Fadia, who shot to fame when he was all of 15 with his book "Unofficial Guide to Ethical Hacking", stood his ground and said the appointment letter was issued on July 1 and signed by then IT secretary Ram Sewak Sharma, now chairman of the telecom watchdog.
 
"Yes! I posted the certificate on Facebook yesterday. I have emails from government as proof as well," Fadia told IANS in an SMS. The said post on Facebook alluded to his claims, pointing out that he had been retained for a period of one year to propagate products and applications.
 
His Facebook post also said: "Humbled and honored to be appointed as one of the brand ambassadors to Prime Minister Narendra Modi's 'Digital India' initiative."
 
Earlier on Tuesday, Facebook sought to clarify on another controversy over "Digital India" -- in terms of the support for the initiative reportedly sought by chief executive Mark Zuckerberg. Critics on social media felt it also implied support for the much-criticised Internet.og initiative.
 
It started when Zuckerberg changed his profile picture on Facebook with a tint of green, saffron and white of the Tricolour in a symbolic gesture to suggest he supports Prime Minister Modi's "Digital India" campaign.
 
He asked others to follow suit.
 
Accordingly, a host of Facebook users started doing the same. But it was soon noticed that if you changed your display, the code below had a small bit with the word Internet.org -- an initiative netizens have been opposing for allegedly being anti-net neutrality. 
 
It thus sent out a feeling that support to "Digital India" also meant support for Internet.org. But Facebook later clarified that it was an inadvertent mistake by an engineer and that there was absolutely no connection between updating a profile picture for 'Digital India' and Internet.org
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)