Companies & Sectors
Unitech firms were ineligible for 2G licences: CBI
The CBI on Wednesday told a special court here that Unitech group's firms were ineligible and made false representations before the Department of Telecommunications (DoT) while seeking 2G spectrum licences.
 
Advancing final arguments in the 2G case, special public prosecutor Anand Grover told Special Judge O.P. Saini that the company knowingly and fraudulently misrepresented facts in the application forms.
 
The Central Bureau of Investigation chargesheet alleged that Unitech Ltd. managing director Sanjay Chandra, who is an accused in the case, conspired with others to get the 2G licences.
 
Chandra and Unitech Wireless (Tamil Nadu) Pvt. Ltd. have denied the allegations.
 
The final arguments in the case would continue on Thursday.
 
Former telecom minister A. Raja, DMK Rajya Sabha member Kanimozhi and others are facing trial in the 2G spectrum allocation case.
 
According to the CBI, Raja was biased in allocating 2G mobile airwaves and operating licences to telecom firms, causing huge loss to the exchequer.
 
The court framed charges against 14 accused and three companies under various provisions of Indian Penal Code and Prevention of Corruption Act on October 22, 2011.
 
All accused, including Raja, are out on bail.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Single drop blood tests may not be accurate
Just a single drop of blood in fingerpric test may not produce accurate results, warns a new study.
 
Results from a single drop of blood are highly variable, and as many as six to nine drops must be combined to achieve consistent results, the findings showed.
 
"A growing number of clinically important tests are performed using fingerprick blood, and this is especially true in low-resource settings," said one of the researchers, Meaghan Bond from Rice University in Houston, US.
 
"It is important to understand how variations in fingerprick blood collection protocols can affect point-of-care test accuracy as well as how results might vary between different kinds of point-of-care tests that use fingerprick blood from the same patient," Bond noted.
 
For the study, the researchers drew six successive 20-microlitre droplets of blood from 11 donors. 
 
As an additional test to determine whether minimum droplet size might also affect the results, they drew 10 successive 10-microliter droplets from seven additional donors.
 
All droplets were drawn from the same fingerprick, and the researchers followed best practices in obtaining the droplets.
 
For experimental controls, they used venipuncture, the standard of care in most hospitals, to draw tubes of blood from an arm vein.
 
The researchers found that hemoglobin content, platelet count and white blood cell count each varied significantly from drop to drop.
 
"Some of the differences were surprising," Bond said. 
 
"For example, in some donors, the hemoglobin concentration changed by more than two grams per decilitre in the span of two successive drops of blood," Bond noted.
 
Averaging the results of the droplet tests could produce results that were on par with venous blood tests, but tests on six to nine drops blood were needed to achieve consistent results, the findings showed.
 
The study appeared in the American Journal of Clinical Pathology.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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300-plus Facebook friends means stress for teenagers
Having more than 300 Facebook friends may increase a teenager's levels of cortisol, the stress hormone, says a new study.
 
"While other important external factors are also responsible, we estimated that the isolated effect of Facebook on cortisol was around eight percent," said lead researcher Sonia Lupien, professor at University of Montreal in Canada.
 
"We were able to show that beyond 300 Facebook friends, adolescents showed higher cortisol levels; we can therefore imagine that those who have 1,000 or 2,000 friends on Facebook may be subjected to even greater stress," Lupien noted.
 
On the other hand, the researchers found that teenagers who act in ways that support their Facebook friends - for example, by liking what they posted or sending them words of encouragement - decreased their levels of cortisol. 
 
Lupien and her colleagues recruited 88 participants aged 12-17 years who were asked about their frequency of use of Facebook, their number of friends on the social media site, their self-promoting behaviour, and finally, the supporting behaviour they displayed towards their friends. 
 
Along with these four measures, the team collected cortisol samples of the participating adolescents. The samples were taken four times a day for three days.
 
"We did not observe depression in our participants. However, adolescents who present high stress hormone levels do not become depressed immediately; it can occur later on," Lupien cautioned. 
 
The findings were published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 

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