Right to Information
Under law, Ministers should have been declaring cash, assets even before demonetisation
Prime Minister Narendra Modi has directed all ministers from Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) to declare their bank account transactions between 8th November and 31 December 2016 to Party President Amit Shah. However, the fact is, all the ministers are bound by Code of Conduct and Representation of People’s Act (Section 29-A) to declare their cash and other assets. Importantly, this Code of Conduct is still not uploaded on the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) website. Treated as a confidential document, it has been procured under Right to information (RTI) Act. 
 
The Code of Conduct rules applicable to every Union and State ministers states that:
 
“In addition to the observance of the provision of the Constitution, the Representation of the Peoples’ Act 1951 and any other law for the time being in force, a person before taking office as a minister, shall:
a) Disclose to the Prime Minister or the Chief Minister, as the case may be, details of the assets and liabilities and business interests of himself and members of his family. The details to be disclosed shall consist of particulars of all movable property and the total approximate value of (i) shares and debentures (ii) cash holdings and (iii) jewellery.”
 
In addition, Venkatesh Nayak, RTI scholar and coordinator of Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative (CHRI) who invoked the RTI, says, “As Members of the Lok Sabha and the Rajya Sabha, Ministers declare details of their assets and liabilities in accordance with Section 75A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951 (see pages 38-39 in this document). These declarations are voluntarily disclosed by the Government. Information under these declarations contain details of the "cash in hand" declared by every Minister in addition to details of bank deposits, other movable and immovable property that they own along with similar details of assets owned by his or her spouse and dependent children.’’
 
In fact, these details, declared by most of the Union Ministers as on 31st March 2016 are accessible on the official website of the Prime Minister's Office. Nayak has compiled the list of ministers who have declared their cash holdings as well as their bank deposits. He says, “The biggest amount under ‘cash in hand’ in the Council of Ministers was declared by the Finance Minister - more than Rs65 lakh. The Prime Minister declared more than Rs89,000 as cash in hand.” (See list attached). 
 
 
The amount ranges is between Rs80,000 to Rs22 lakh for other ministers with Jaitley’s being the highest at Rs65 lakh. So, do we expect any scandalous revelation of high cash to BJP President Amit Shah? Unlikely.
 
Under RTI, one can procure information about deposits made by ministers
 
Nayak argues that, citizens have the right to ask as to where and when ministers deposited their cash after Demonetisation. According to him, disclosing such information will not be a violation of privacy of the Ministers and citizens can use RTI Act to ask the Central Government such questions without worrying about violating the right to privacy of the Ministers. 
 
In August 2015, the Central Government got the Attorney General of India (AGI) to question a catena of judgements of the Supreme Court that the right to privacy was a fundamental right. In a bunch of matters challenging the actions of the Government to make Aadhaar Unique Identification compulsory for a range of services and welfare programmes, the AGI put this question to the
 
Apex Court. The Supreme Court felt persuaded to refer the matter to a Constitution Bench to determine whether people in India indeed have a constitutionally guaranteed right to privacy. 
“Given these facts, in my humble opinion, the Government's view is that there is no fundamental right to privacy for anybody including for Ministers under the Constitution. So Section 8(1)(j) of the RTI Act, which was designed to protect personal information from being disclosed leading to unwarranted invasion of the privacy of an individual, becomes an unreasonable restriction on the fundamental right to information which is a part of the right to freedom of speech and expression guaranteed under Article 19(1)(a) of the Constitution. So, there should be no legal bar on providing answers to the information sought regarding where and when ministers have deposited the money,” Nayak says.
 
What about making funding to political parties, white and cashless?
 
Prime Minister Modi has not touched upon the area of political funding, much of which is in cash and unaccounted money of political parties, is in public purview. How about bringing political parties under RTI so that they are transparent and under public eye? 
 
As Jagdeep Chhokar, former dean of Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (IIM-A) and Trustee of Association of Democratic Reforms, has appropriately stated in one of his columns in Tribune, “…the reality is that the CIC declared the six political parties as public authorities under the RTI Act because they fulfilled the four conditions given in the definition of a public authority given under section 2(h) of the RTI Act. Being ‘substantially financed’ by the government is just one of those conditions. Others are exercise of constitutional authority (under Schedule 10 of the Constitution of India), the requirement of being registered under a “law made by Parliament” (Section 29-A of the Representation of the People Act, 1951), and the claim of working in and for public interest. It was the combined effect of the four reasons that made the CIC declare the six parties as public authorities.” 
 
Anil Bairwal, founder trustee of Association of Democratic Reforms, who had filed a series of RTI applications and found concrete evidence as to why political parties are public authorities under RTI had argued in the CIC that, “A political party controls its nation by getting its candidates elected to the public offices. Political parties visibly declare that they work for the upliftment of the public. Political parties, in their hunt for power, spend more than Rs1,000 crore during elections. Nobody accounts for the bulk of the money so spent and there is no accountability anywhere. There are no proper accounts and no audit at all. In a democracy, where rule of law prevails, this type of naked display of black money, by violating the mandatory provisions of law, cannot be permitted.”
 
(Vinita Deshmukh is consulting editor of Moneylife, an RTI activist and convener of the Pune Metro Jagruti Abhiyaan. She is the recipient of prestigious awards like the Statesman Award for Rural Reporting which she won twice in 1998 and 2005 and the Chameli Devi Jain award for outstanding media person for her investigation series on Dow Chemicals. She co-authored the book “To The Last Bullet - The Inspiring Story of A Braveheart - Ashok Kamte” with Vinita Kamte and is the author of “The Mighty Fall”.)
 

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COMMENTS

Arunkumar A Vijayan

2 days ago

Nice article

Nanda Patel

3 days ago

Even a PWD officers has more money then what this guys have.

Can't trust the figures. may be they have money in their spouse or friend and families names.

R Balakrishnan

4 days ago

Another charade.. At worst some collateral damage. But let us think good. Maybe the future will be a good one for India. As soon as we get out hale and hearty from the present

PMO did not grant permission for Modi's photo for Jio ads
The Prime Minister's Office (PMO) did not grant permission to use the picture of Prime Minister Narendra Modi in print and electronic advertisements of the Reliance Jio, parliament was told on Thursday.
 
In a written reply in Rajya Sabha to a question by Samajwadi Party's Neeraj Shekhar, Minister of State for Information and Broadcasting Rajyavardhan Singh Rathore also admitted that it was aware that Reliance Jio used the Prime Minister's photographs in the advertisement. 
 
"Yes sir, the government was aware," said Rathore, adding that no permission was granted by PMO.
 
He added that the Directorate of Advertising and Visual Publicity (DAVP), a media unit of ministry, is the nodal agency for release of advertisement on the policies and programme of the government in various media vehicles, but "releases government advertisements only and does not release advertisements of any private body". 
 
As Shekhar sought to know about the actions taken against Jio, if permission was not taken in advance, Rathore replies that the necessary act, the Emblems and Names (prevention of improper use) Act 1950, is administered by the Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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Long queues at banks as many ATMs shut in Bengaluru
With hundreds of ATMs shut after cash dried up in them by Thursday afternoon, thousands of people queued up at banks in the city to draw whatever amount they could get across the counters.
 
Barring a few ATMs of private banks and the State Bank of India (SBI) in some commercial and residential areas, most of other bank ATMs had no money.
 
"As more cash was required in the banks for withdrawal by their saving and current account holders on the month's first day for wages and contingencies, many of them could not replenish notes in their ATMs post-noon," admitted a bank union representative to IANS here.
 
With the acute shortage of new Rs 500 notes even a fortnight after the sudden demonetisation on November 8, most of the ATMs in the city and across Karnataka have been doling out the new Rs 2,000 notes or Rs 100 and Rs 50 notes up to Rs 2,500 daily for every debit or credit card holder.
 
"We had a tough time in giving even cash across the counters to our account holders as the supply from our treasury chest was 25 per cent (Rs 15 lakh) of our daily need of Rs 60 lakh. We had to literally ration the cash for each customer to ensure they don't go out empty-handed," lamented Karnataka Bank's branch manager Sadanand Kumar.
 
Though saving account holders are entitled to draw up to Rs 24,000 per week and current account holders up to Rs 50,000 a week, many of them were told come on Friday and Saturday to collect the remaining amount on priority as there was no enough cash to meet the demand.
 
In many state-run banks like Canara Bank's branch on Infantry Road in the city's central business district, several customers had to wait outside two hours as it ran out of cash and supply was delayed due to shortage at its treasury office.
 
"We had to restrict and regulate entry of customers into the branch to prevent crowding the premises and avoid any untoward incident due to heavy rush for withdrawals and as our ATM in the annex had to be shut for want of cash," said a bank official on the condition of anonymity.
 
Being the largest state-run bank with 200 branches and 2,000 ATMs across the city, SBI coped with the rush, as it had enough cash to distribute through its ATMs and counters despite long queues till 4 p.m.
 
"We have managed to serve about 10,000 customers till the closing hours in the branch with separate counters for withdrawals, deposits and senior citizens," said Srinivasa Rao, Senior Manager of SBI's Shivajinagar branch.
 
To meet the urgent needs of current account holders, including companies and commercial establishments, the bank had to rationalise withdrawals by saving account holders, as deposits were mostly of old Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes, which are invalid.
 
"Even our regular customers are not depositing enough Rs 100 and Rs 50 notes but Rs.2,000 notes. As a result, we are unable to rotate cash as before demonetisation. With the new Rs.500 notes in short-supply, we are forced to give Rs.20 and Rs.10 notes or coins for retail customers," added Rao.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 

 

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COMMENTS

MUKESH AGARWAL

3 days ago

Note Printing may also be delegated to SBI from RBI as Banks are piller for demonetisation and facing public comments for short supply of currency from RBI

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