World
Twitter warns users of state-sponsored attacks
After Facebook and Google, now Twitter has alerted its users to falling a victim of a state-sponsored cyberattack, a media report said here.
 
"The social network recently alerted some users that they 'may have been targeted' by government attackers trying to get email addresses, network connections and phone numbers," The Verge reported on Saturday.
 
At least 11 Twitter users, who are working as mass surveillance researchers, security professionals, and (one) privacy organisation, on Friday received notifications that their accounts might have been targeted by state-sponsored attackers.
 
The Twitter noted in its notification letter that it believes only email addresses, IP addresses, and phone numbers would have been exposed.
 
Recently, both Facebook and Google issued similar emergency alerts for state-sponsored attacks. Facebook launched alerts in October and immediately recognised attacks on state department employees.
 
A story in New York Times had indicated that the federal department found out about those attacks because of the alert system.
 
The attacks are a matter of concern because access to social media accounts can be lucrative for determined attackers.
 
One account could yield access to dozens of others and open up lines of communication between people in a particular field or network.
 
Twitter is offering suggestions like using Tor to anyone who is worried that their personal information is out in the wild.
 
Tor is free software for enabling anonymous communication and directs internet traffic through a free, worldwide, volunteer network to conceal a user's location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Don't blame us for floods: Tamil Nadu government
The Tamil Nadu government said on Sunday that it can't be blamed for the massive flooding of Chennai following the heaviest rains in a century.
 
Chief Secretary K. Gnanadesikan denied that official indecision or mismanagement vis-a-vis the release of water from the Chembarambakkam lake into the Adyar river caused the all-round destruction.
 
He said in a statement that the floods were caused primarily due to the very high rainfall in November, which was followed by more rains in Chennai, Kanchipuram and Tiruvallur districts on December 1.
 
Media reports have said flooding of the Adyar that killed many and destroyed livelihood and assets of millions of people was due to improper management of water releases from the Chembarambakkam lake.
 
Gnanadesikan said the India Meteorological Department (IMD) on November 30 and December 1 had issued advisories of isolated heavy rainfall and not 50 cm rainfall as reported by some media groups.
 
He said that in meteorological terminology, 'isolated' means only in one or two places, heavy rainfall is between 6.4 cm to 12.4 cm while very heavy rain stands for 12.4 cm to 24.4 cm of rainfall.
 
He dismissed as "malicious" and "canards" allegations that engineers at the lake waited for instructions from the principal secretary of the Public Works Department and the chief secretary and the imputation that the officers were waiting to be ordered by Chief Minister J. Jayalalithaa.
 
According to Gnanadesikan, the level of water reservoirs required to be maintained at two feet below full tank level while monsoon is still active.
 
He said the rules balance the interests of water storage for the scarcity period, the need to control flooding in downstream areas and the safety of the reservoir.
 
Gnanadesikan said adequate flood warnings were issued to people living in low lying areas on December 1, and over 47,300 people were evacuated.
 
He said many tanks were breached due to heavy rains and the water flowed into the Adyar river which flows through Chennai.
 
"The flow in Adyar reached its full capacity due to the surplus from Chembarambakkam tank, the inflow from the catchment areas of Adyar within Chennai and the surplus received from the other tanks," he said.
 
"In view of the heavy flow in the Adyar, the high intensity runoff of local rainfall in Chennai and adjoining urban areas could not fully drain into the Adyar and hence contributed to the inundation of the city."
 
The Tamil Nadu floods have killed nearly 350 people in four districts including Chennai and caused widespread destruction. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

M Muralidharan

12 months ago

false pride no responsibility.

Paris Agreement draws applause, some concerns remain
The Paris agreement on climate change was largely welcomed by stakeholders in India and abroad, including Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government, but there was also the concern that the rich countries could have done more to save the planet from the effects of global warming.
 
Modi hailed the agreement on climate change as the collective wisdom of world leaders to mitigate the danger, adding that there were no winners or losers in the outcome of the agreement.
 
"Deliberations at the 21st Conference of Parties (CoP21) and Paris Agreement demonstrate the collective wisdom of world leaders to mitigate climate change," Modi said on Sunday. The outcome of the Paris agreement has no winners or losers; climate justice has won, he said.
 
The landmark Paris Agreement on climate change was adopted by 196 countries, committing them to curb global warming to well below two degrees Celsius and outline a roadmap to raise $100 billion annually towards a green fund for developing nations.
 
"For the first time, every country in the world has pledged to curb emissions, strengthen resilience and join in common cause to take common climate action. This is a resounding success for multilateralism," said UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon.
 
US President Barack Obama called the agreement a "turning point for the world" and said it sent powerful signal that the world was firmly committed to a low-carbon future.
 
Environment, Forests and Climate Change Minister Prakash Javadekar said the pact could have been more ambitious as the commitment from rich nations was "much below" what was expected of them, but the basic concept of 'common but differentiated responsibilities' was largely addressed.
 
"To achieve big things as there are languages and many issues, when 196 countries are putting their efforts together, one needs to be accommodative without changing the thrust of the agreement. We've done everything to maintain that thrust," Javadekar said.
 
"Today is a historic day. What we have adopted today is not only an agreement but a new chapter of hope in the lives of seven billion people," the minister said at the closing plenary in Paris. 
 
"Today we reassure our future generation that we all will mitigate the challenge posed by climate change and give them a better future."
 
At the Conference of Parties (CoP), India provided leadership to the interests of the developing countries and lesser developed countries, Minister of Power Piyush Goyal said after the Paris accord was adopted.
 
"At CoP 21,196 countries assembled to tackle the most difficult problem facing our planet. 1,600 dissent points reduced to 0 in 10 days," Goyal said.
 
Nirmala Sitharaman, minister for commerce and industry, also applauded India's role at the CoP 21 and hoped for climate equity and justice for India.
 
However, environment protection organisation Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) called the deal "weak and unambitious" as it erases the historical responsibility of the developed countries.
 
"The draft Paris agreement continues to be weak and unambitious, as it does not include any meaningful targets for developed countries to reduce their emissions," said Sunita Narain, director general, CSE, in a statement.
 
Narain added that the agreement did not operationalise equity and that the term carbon budget did not even find mention in the text, which would end up furthering "climate apartheid".
 
CSE analyses that India will be under constant pressure to take more burden for mitigating climate change by 2020 and beyond, especially when the next review of all the nationally determined contributions of countries take place.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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