World
Tri-Valley founder gets 16 years prison for running fake university

Prosecutors say Susan Xiao-Ping Su, founder and president of the phony Tri-Valley University was selling visa-related documents that allowed foreigners, mostly Indian nationals, to live in the US

 

A San Francisco woman has been sentenced to more than 16 years in prison for running what prosecutors say was a sham university that served as a front for an immigration scam.

 

Susan Xiao-Ping Su, founder and president of the phony Tri-Valley University, was also ordered during a hearing Friday to forfeit $5.6 million and pay more than $900,000 in restitution.

 

Federal prosecutors say Su was selling visa-related documents that allowed foreigners, mostly Indian nationals, to live in the US.

 

She was convicted in March of visa fraud and other charges. Multiple Tri-Valley employees testified that the school had no graduation or admission requirements and that Su instructed her staff to fabricate transcripts and other documents.

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COMMENTS

shivkumar

2 years ago

How many so called educational Institutions in India are Bogus? Does anybody have a count? They merrily keep on making money knowing jolly well that many law makers themselves are involved in such frauds.

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Mexican mayor, wife arrested over 43 missing students

The students vanished on 26th September after municipal police shot at their buses in the city of Iguala, 200 km south of Mexico City, and then handed the 43 to the Guerreros Unidos drug gang

 

Mexican police has detained a fugitive former mayor and his wife accused of ordering a deadly police attack that left 43 students missing, raising hopes of a break in a case bedevilling the nation.

 

Jose Luis Abarca, the former mayor of the southern city of Iguala, and his wife Maria de los Angeles Pineda were captured by federal officers before dawn in Mexico City's populous working-class district of Iztapalapa, authorities said Tuesday.

 

Officials hope the arrest will yield new clues about the whereabouts of the students in a disappearance that has drawn international condemnation, sparked national protests and shaken President Enrique Pena Nieto's administration.

 

"I hope that this arrest will contribute in a decisive manner ... To the investigation undertaken by the attorney general's office," said Pena Nieto, who last week met parents angry at the pace of the probe.

 

The couple was arrested in a small, cement-coloured house with a dusty courtyard, far from their opulent life in Iguala, where Abarca owned jewellery stores and his wife allegedly ran local operations for the Guerreros Unidos drug gang.

 

"There was no violence in the operation," a national security commission spokesman told AFP on condition of anonymity, adding that the two were being interrogated by federal prosecutors.

 

A neighbour said the house used to be owned by an elderly couple who died months ago. Others saw a woman go in and out periodically.

 

"We were very scared when the police descended on the house," a woman living nearby told AFP.

 

Authorities say the students vanished on 26th September after municipal police shot at their buses in the city of Iguala, 200 km south of Mexico City, and then handed the 43 to the Guerreros Unidos.

 

Six people died in the night of violence. In one gangland-style killing, a dead student was found with his facial skin peeled off and eyes gouged out.

 

The teacher, college students remain missing despite a vast search operation by troops, helicopters and boats in the state of Guerrero, where a dozen mass graves containing 38 unidentified bodies have been discovered.

 

Guerrero's interim governor, Rogelio Ortego, told the Televisa network that the capture could lead to 'substantial leads' in the search.

 

Manuel Martinez, a spokesman for the families of the missing, told AFP that investigators 'must make him speak' because Abarca 'knows where they are'.

 

Abarca, his wife, and the city's police chief went on the run two days after the September 26 police attack. The Guerrero state legislature impeached him weeks later.

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