Citizens' Issues
The many holes in Mumbai Revised Draft Development Plan
The Revised Draft Development Plan (RDDP) for Mumbai, which envisions the future of Mumbai till 2034 is of special importance, since it is the first time public participation had been officially sought and encouraged in developing the planning itself. However, despite several opportunities, the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM) continues repeating grave mistakes in the RDDP and citizens need to raise their voice, since this Plan has implication for the next 20 years, says Advocate Godfrey Pimenta. 
 
He was speaking at an interactive and fully packed seminar at Moneylife Foundation on "The Mumbai Development Plan DCR 2034: It has implications for our development and open spaces for the next 20 years. Find out how it affects you".
 
 
He pointed out that the many errors, which were present in the earlier draft DP released in February 2015 and were pointed out by citizens, are there even in the latest plan. He gave a reference of about 27 churches that have been shown as educational institutes instead of religious places. More shockingly, the RDDP has declared three churches and the entire slum area between Saki Naka till Ghatkopar hills as garden, Adv Pimenta pointed out. "In addition, there is no marking of religious buildings.” One of the attendees present pointed out that the state secretariat has been marked as commercial zone and roads are shows going over and below the hills.
 
Ad. Pimenta alleged that the Coastal Road plan is merely a ploy for builders to usurp present No Development Zone (NDZ) lands. He gave example of area from Madh to Marve. He said that the Coastal Road will disturb a number of Gaothans and Koliwadas which have been dwellings of original inhabitants of Mumbai (many of whom are known as East Indians) as feeder roads will pass through these. He said that we need to preserve these Gaothans and Koliwadas as Heritage Precincts. Also about 300 acres land would be reclaimed at Colaba for Central Park, he said which would lead to impact on environmental and fishermen nearby. 
 
 
He also said, "…the state government proposes to construct 10 lakh affordable houses for the poor in cities like Mumbai, Thane, Nagpur, Pune and other municipal areas. However, the MCGM by misinterpreting the state policy is exploiting the plan. What is stated in the RDDP 2034 by the MCGM for affordable housing is a mere facade to grab about 3,000 hectares of land from the no development zone salt pan lands for real estate development." 
 
The Mumbai development plan was first been drawn up in 1964 and have been revised twice since then. It was last revised in 1991. However, over the past more than 50 years, only 10%-12% of each of these plans were implemented. Changes are made in the DP to convert the original reservations without public consultations. As a result, the city has been growing rapidly but without a proper development plan in place. This has resulted in a growth in a totally unplanned manner thus stressing the infrastructure. It is highly necessary for the citizens to get actively involved in the DP process to ensure that their quality of life does not get further deteriorated.

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COMMENTS

sundararaman gopalakrishnan

5 months ago

Another method used by governments to build more and choke the city in connivance with builders etc..

MAHENDRA ISLANIYA

5 months ago

Points raised by "Money" life are absolutely right & as Concerned Mumbai citizen, i am agreed.

Mahesh S Bhatt

5 months ago

Lets stop find faults support corrections & move on Mahesh

Artificial sweeteners can make you actually eat more
Researchers have identified a complex network in the brain that has revealed why artificial sweeteners may not be the best way to slim down.
 
Artificial sweeteners are substitutes for sugar that provides a sweet taste like that of sugar while containing significantly less food energy.
 
According to the researchers, the brain system responds to artificially sweetened food by telling the animal it hasn't eaten enough energy, thus increasing the appetite and prompting them to actually eat more.
 
It senses and integrates the sweetness and energy content of food, said the study conducted on mice and fruit flies.
 
"After chronic exposure to a diet that contained the artificial sweetener sucralose, we saw that animals began eating a lot more," said lead researcher Greg Neely, Associate Professor at the University of Sydney in Australia.
 
"Artificial sweeteners can actually change how animals perceive the sweetness of their food, with a discrepancy between sweetness and energy levels prompting an increase in caloric consumption," Neely added.
 
The findings showed that inside the brain's reward centres, sweet sensation is integrated with energy content. When sweetness versus energy is out of balance for a period of time, the brain recalibrates and increases total calories consumed.
 
For the study, fruit flies were exposed to a diet laced with artificial sweetener for prolonged periods (more than five days). The flies were then found to consume 30% more calories when they were then given naturally sweetened food.
 
The team also replicated the study using mice. The mice that consumed a sucralose-sweetened diet for seven days displayed a significant increase in food consumption, and the neuronal pathway involved was the same as in the fruit flies.
 
"The chronic consumption of the artificial sweetener actually increases the sweet intensity of real nutritive sugar which then increases the animal's overall motivation to eat more food," Neely stated in the work published in the journal Cell Metabolism.
 
Further, the artificial sweeteners were also found to promote hyperactivity, insomnia as well as decrease the sleep quality - behaviours consistent with a mild starvation or fasting state.
 
"The pathway discovered is part of a conserved starvation response that actually makes nutritious food taste better when you are starving," Neely noted.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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Pokemon Go raises users' security, safety concerns
The newly-launched augmented reality (AR) game Pokemon Go poses a great data security threat to users as the app gets "full access" to their Google account, allowing the gaming company to read all emails, a new report said on Wednesday.
 
According to security software company Trend Micro, for some users of iPhones, signing into the game with the most convenient option -- using your Google account -- allows the gaming company to read your emails. 
 
"Other risks this game exposes are physical risks to actual life and limb," the report said.
 
While enjoying the game, the user is exposed to many threats and introduces whole new categories of life risks.
 
Firstly, Pokemon Go's real-world gameplay has been linked to armed robberies as criminals have used the game to locate and lure intended targets. 
 
Secondly, there are reports of trespassing as enthusiastic players try to "find" and "capture" creatures on others' property. In the US, gamers trespassing on others' property face a real threat of physical harm from property owners who may use force to protect their property. 
 
"And of course, there's the risk of injury or death from not paying attention to your surroundings as you play the game," the report added.
 
Thirdly, the users can meet an accident while they are indulged in gaming. 
 
The game requires users' full attention immediately to the exclusion of all else. 
 
Although, there is a warning each time you start the game to be sure to pay attention but that warning is quickly overlooked.
 
In the US, where the game is very popular, police departments and safety agencies have warned players of Pokemon Go to stay safe and alert as hysteria over the popular mobile game swells.
 
Since launch, the game has topped 7.5 million downloads and pulled in an average of $1.6 million a day in revenue, according to estimates from research firm SensorTower.
 
"Agencies have urged players to stay aware of their surroundings and be careful," USA Today reported.
 
This is how the game works.
 
It uses the GPS capabilities of your device in conjunction with Google Maps to "place" creatures in real world locations, which you then try to find them using your device as a guide. 
 
Once you are in proximity to the "placed" creature, you then use your device's camera to "view" the creature and try to "capture" it. 
 
"This works with you using your device as a viewer to 'see' the creature near you by looking at an image from the camera with the creature superimposed on it. You then 'capture' the creature for points by throwing Poké Balls at it on the device's screen," Trend Micro stated.
 
The Pokemon Go is available on Google Playstore and Apple's App Store in the US, Japan and Australia, Philippines, New Zealand and is coming soon in India, Singapore, Germany, Taiwan, Indonesia and Britain.
 
However, a mirror file is available on the internet and people in India are already downloading the game from insecured sources. 
 
The Pokemon Go Plus device which is a wrist watch will be available in August, informed apkqueen.com, the website which is providing link to download the game.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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