World
The importance of taking risks (The Funny Side)
I never used to be a risk-taker but then I had children who would play in the park and say things like: "Daddy, close your eyes and open your mouth." You soon learn what true courage is.
 
A gutsy decision was made recently: a couple who got top score on a farm-themed mobile phone game took home a live cow as their prize. Game-maker Digital Media gives winners the option of taking their award in the form of steaks, but the latest winners, from Tunisia, took the entire cow "as is".
 
"That way they get the cow as a pet, but also have the option of turning it into steaks later," said reader Bernard Betts, who sent me the news item.
 
Reading it reminded me of a solo sailor I once met who went on long sea voyages with a dog called Emergency Rations. He assured me that the pooch had no idea what his name meant, but it kept making worried eyes at him.
 
Anyway, I like that the cow-winners chose the brave option. The same could be said for UK university students who this month elected a cat as honorary president, I heard from reader Sara Padilla. I added that to my list of unbelievable-but-true election results. In 1967 a tin of itchy foot powder was elected mayor of a town in Ecuador; in 1988, a chimpanzee stood for election in Rio de Janeiro under the slogan "Vote monkey, get monkey" (possibly the only honest political slogan in the history of the world); and in 2004 the US public re-elected George W. Bush, when it was clear to everyone else in the world that a tin of itchy foot powder would make better decisions.
 
Of course, you can also make life interesting by making original decisions on a smaller scale. Reader Rajiva Singhe forwarded me a news item about a US business traveller who noticed a box on his hotel booking form labelled "additional requests". So Sean Fitzsimons wrote something silly on it: "If it's not too much trouble could you build a fort out of pillows?" The hotel staff did. Now he always puts in offbeat requests ("I would like a photo of a dog dressed as a sea captain") purely to challenge hoteliers and increase the amount of fun in the world.
 
I immediately thought of "additional requests" I could make for some of the hotels I stay in around in Asia: 1) "A bed that doesn't collapse in the night"; 2) "Edible food"; 3) "Staff which speak at least one of the top 10 human languages", 4) "A door that closes" and the like. That should challenge them!
 
Anyway, if I ever win a mobile phone farm-themed game, I'm definitely going for the live cow option, whatever trouble I get into. Wife: "You said you wouldn't bring home any more large useless items." Me (covering the ears of cow): "Shhh! She can hear you, darling."
 
Meanwhile, a lot of people have been complaining about elections this year. If you don't like the candidates, nominate a tin of foot powder, or just vote for anyone whose slogan has the frankness level of "Vote monkey, get monkey". You get someone honest, and it's good to be a risk-taker.

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COMMENTS

Harish Kohli

1 year ago

I hope the guy from Tunisia was lucky if the whole idea of having a cow as a pet and having the option of steak on his plate (well done for me if I was invited). Something similar did not work out for us.
I am talking of something that happened a long time ago, many many years after the Stone age, when chicken was an expensive luxury compared to mutton. To get over it we hatched eggs, got chicks and saw them grow looking forward to the good meal we would have. One day my young sister named all of them. Soon we could point out which was which. The D day came and we decided to enjoy the fruits of our labour. My sister washed off all plans just by simply saying "Who are you planning to have on the table; Mary or Rose or Jane ........."
I wonder if the Tunisian named the cow and had his steak!

Bapoo Malcolm

1 year ago

We take risks every time. We vote man, get monkey. Or worse. And our risk taking is addictive. We never learn, do we?

'Intermediate mechanism to tackle NPAs'
New Delhi : An 'intermediate mechanism' is in the offing for resolution of non-performing assets (NPAs) of banks, Bank Board Bureau chairman Vinod Rai said here on Friday.
 
“We are putting in place an intermediate mechanism which will analyse some of the processes which will be triggered to settle the NPAs which the banks are carrying in their balance sheets,” Rai said at the fifth Banking and Finance Summit 2016, organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).
 
“It should be in place in a fortnight or maximum three weeks from now.”
 
The intermediate mechanism will be in the domain of banks and outside the Bank Board Bureau, Rai added.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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