Consumer Issues
The Fine Print - Read It
A reminder during National Consumer Protection Week to mind the teeny words at the bottom of ads
 
Ah, the fine print – the teeny words at the bottom of an ad that contain the details of an offer. Even radio ads use a similar tactic where a fast-talking announcer rambles off some lingo at the beginning or end of a commercial. Many of us tune out and don’t even see or hear the fine print in ads. 
The problem is that advertisers are onto us and some take advantage of our tendency to turn a blind eye and deaf ear to the pesky little details.
 
The Good News?
 
There are rules in place that are meant to protect us. First, fine print isn’t supposed to contradict other statements in an ad or clear up false impressions the ad might leave. In other words, what the headline giveth, the fine print is not supposed to taketh away.
Second, disclosures should be “clear and conspicuous.” That means the important stuff is not supposed to be hidden in teeny tiny print. How to know if a disclosure meets the “clear and conspicuous” standard? Well, there aren’t any hard and fast rules about the size of type in a print ad or the length of time a disclosure must appear on TV, but the FTC does use a 4-pronged test to determine if an ad’s fine print passes muster:
  1. Prominence: is the fine print big enough for people to notice and read? 
  2. Presentation: is the wording and format easy for people to understand? 
  3. Placement: is the fine print where people will look? 
  4. Proximity: is the fine print near the claim it qualifies?
If the answer to any of these questions is “no,” then the fine print doesn’t comply with the law.
 
The Bad News?
 
There are plenty of advertisers who believe rules are meant to be broken (just see some examples below). The best way to protect yourself against unexpected disclaimers is to pull out that magnifying glass and read the fine print (as painful as that may be). Of course, you can’t do that when the ad plays on TV and the fine print is displayed for 3 seconds. In those situations, make sure you ask for the details and disclaimers before you whip out your credit card.
Here are some examples of fine print that would mostly fail to meet the FTC’s 4-prong test:
Lane Bryant:
 
The big, bold writing tells you that “absolutely everything” in the “entire store” is 40 percent off. But once you take a closer look at the fine print, you’ll find that, by “entire store,” they don’t really mean the “entire store,” and by “absolutely everything,” they don’t really mean “absolutely everything.” Beyond that, though, the ad is entirely and absolutely accurate.
 
Dell:
 
 
In 2011, Dell trumpeted its XPS-15 laptop as “the thinnest 15” PC on the planet” in British newspapers. However, the ads included fine print that revealed that the claim was based on comparisons with models manufactured by Acer, Asus, Hewlett Packard, Lenovo, MSI, Samsung, Sony, and Toshiba. The disclosure went on to mention that “no comparison [was] made with Apple or other manufacturers not listed.” Kind of begs the question, what planet are they talking about?
 
CashCall.com:
 
 
CashCall tells us that we can “borrow $1,000 or $5,000 in as fast as a day.” True, but the loan comes with a ginormous annual interest rate. The fine print that flashes up on the screen explains that the company will give you an instant loan of $2,600, but that the loan comes with a whopping 99.25 percent APR!
 
Crayola “Washable” Bubbles:
 
 
A revolution in the bubble industry! And safe for clothes, too! Only, it turns out that “some bubbles” in the ad were “recreated” (note the disclaimer at the 0:12 second mark of the ad). And the clothes-safe part? Well, sort of. The fine print you can barely read at the 0:22 second mark (don’t blink!) says that it may require a few washings.
 
Not surprisingly, a Washington mom filed a class-action lawsuit against Crayola alleging false advertising because the ads and labeling indicated that the bubbles were “washable.” Result? Crayola agreed to provide refunds and vouchers to those who purchased the product in 2011, in addition to paying for damages to property and clothing. Crayola has also reformulated the product for 2012 and guess what? They don’t say “washable” anymore. 
 

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US auction house official guilty of smuggling ivory, rhino horn
Washington : An official of a California-based auction house pleaded guilty of smuggling carvings and other items made from protected wildlife worth $1 million.
 
Joseph Chait, a senior auction administrator of the I.M. Chait gallery and auction house, pleaded guilty to smuggling elephant ivory, rhinoceros horn and coral in a New York federal court, prosecutors said on Wednesday. He could face up to 10 years in prison under two related charges, Xinhua news agency reported.
 
Prosecutors said he falsified customs forms to show that items made from protected wildlife were made of bone, wood or plastic. 
 
He also helped overseas clients smuggle such items out of the US.
 
According to sources, one carving made from rhino horn was auctioned for $230,000.
 
The announcement came on the same day as the International Union for Conservation of Nature said in a statement that more than 1,300 rhinos were poached in Africa last year, a record since 2008 when trade in rhino horns became banned in South Africa. 
 
The country is reportedly home to 20,000 rhinos, or 80 percent of the world's rhino population.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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An Intelligent Keyboard
Swiftkey learns as you type
 
Swiftkey is an app which replaces your normal Android keyboard with an intelligent keyboard. It learns as you type, helps you correct spelling mistakes, automatically adds words to the dictionary and also predicts your next word. It tracks your own personalised writing style based on whatever you type on the keyboard, your messages, your emails, Facebook or Twitter and prompts you when you are typing the same thing the next time. The flow feature also lets you slide your fingertip over the keyboard, giving you a different typing experience. Auto-correct also learns your slang, nicknames and phrases.  And, the latest version incorporates predictions of 2-words at a time, across 100+ languages!
 
Its in-built profile-tracker tells me that I have already saved 53,000 keystrokes, corrected 26,000 typos, completed or corrected 9,000 words and predicted 5,000 words, since I started using it. There is a small memory overhead for Swiftkey to function; but for all that it does, I would not mind sacrificing twice as much for it. After all, 10 million users in 38 countries, with multi-language support, cannot be wrong! And the news is that Microsoft is going to take over this company very soon.  Please check on https://goo.gl/XpnTf2

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