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What NSA transparency looks like?

Disclosures by the US spy agency about violations of privacy rules have been almost entirely redacted

Last week, the Washington Post published an internal audit finding the NSA had violated privacy rules thousands of times in recent years.
 

In response, the spy agency held a rare conference call for the press maintaining that the violations are “not wilful” and “not malicious.”
 

It is difficult to fully evaluate the NSA’s track record, since the agency has been so tight-lipped on the topic.
 

What information about rule violations has the agency itself released? Take a look:




That is the publicly released version of a semi-annual report from the administration to Congress describing NSA violations of rules surrounding the FISA Amendments Act. The act is one of the key laws governing NSA surveillance, including now-famous programs like Prism.
 

As an oversight measure, the law requires the attorney general to submit semi-annual reports to the congressional intelligence and judiciary committees.
 

The section with the redactions above is titled “Statistical Data Relating to Compliance Incidents.”
 

One of the only unredacted portions reads, “The value of statistical information in assessing compliance in situations such as this is unclear. A single incident, for example, may have broad ramifications. Multiple incidents may increase the incident count, but may be deemed of very limited significance.”
 

The document, dated May 2010, was released after the ACLU filed a freedom of information lawsuit.
 

As the Post noted, members of Congress can read the unredacted version of the semi-annual reports, but only in a special secure room. They cannot take notes or publicly discuss what they read.
 

For more on the NSA, see our story on how the agency says it can’t search its own emails, and what we know about the agency’s tapping of Internet cables.
 

Courtesy: ProPublica.org

 

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