Companies & Sectors
Tata Motors global sales remain flat in June
Tata Motors global sales for the month of June 2015 including Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) remained flat at 76,602 units compared to the year ago period, Tata Motors announced on Thursday.
 
Cumulative sales of the entire group for the current fiscal rose by two percent with the sale of 2,33,487 vehicles, Tata Motors announced in a statement.
 
Global Tata Motors commercial vehicles sales including the Tata Daewoo range for the month of June 2015 amounted to 31,083 vehicles which also remained flat compared to June 2014. Current fiscal cumulative commercial vehicles sales numbered 86,766 units.
 
Same is the trend with all the passenger vehicles sales globally which rose by three percent in June 2015 with 45,519 vehicles compared to the year ago month, the statement added.
 
Luxury car brands of Tata Motors, Jaguar and Land Rover, worldwide registered sales of 34,908 vehicles in June 2015, of these Jaguar brand sold 7,087 vehicles while Land Rover brand sold 27,821 vehicles, the statement added.
 
JLR worldwide sales also includes the sales of CJLR, a joint venture between JLR and Chery Automobiles. Chery Automobiles is an unconsolidated subsidiary of JLR.
 
Jaguar cumulative sales for the running fiscal 2015 - 16 are 21,202 while Land Rover cumulative sales stood at 93,250 vehicles, the statement said.
 
Total cumulative sales between Jaguar and Land Rover worldwide for the current fiscal are 1,14,452 vehicles.
 
Tata Motors is the automobile company of the Indian salt-to-software conglomerate Tata Group. It achieved Rs.2,62,796 ($42.04 billion) consolidated revenues for the year 2014 - 15.

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TINA.org Reports Walmart's Made in USA Mess to FTC
Company website still riddled with false and deceptive made in USA representations
 
Walmart has missed a self-imposed deadline to rid its website of USA labeling errors following a TINA.org investigation that readily uncovered more than 100 false and deceptive made in the USA claims on the site. Three weeks after initially alerting the company to the misrepresentations, the world’s largest retailer has yet to get its house in order.
 
After TINA.org sent Walmart a letter requesting changes, the company pledged it would fix the errors within two weeks. Walmart had called the errors a minor issue and attributed them to coding errors and incorrect information from suppliers. But the site is still riddled with made in the USA misrepresentations and TINA.org is now calling on the FTC to take action to compel changes.
 
“The fact that Walmart has yet to completely clean up its act shows that the problem was never minor or an easy fix,” said Bonnie Patten, executive director of TINA.org, which on Tuesday filed a complaint with the FTC. “Now Walmart will have to answer to the FTC as to why consumers still can’t trust its made in the USA representations.”
 
TINA.org first notified Walmart of the USA labeling issues in a June 22 warning letter. The company has made some headway correcting made in the USA misrepresentations since then — for example, pulling its “Made in the USA” badge from six products (including two of its own brands) that have packaging indicating they are at least partly made in China. But 35 of the first 100 examples of errors that TINA.org published still contain conflicting origin information as of July 13.
 
More importantly, TINA.org has easily identified another 100 USA misrepresentations on the company’s website, casting further doubt on Walmart’s position that the problem is “limited to a small number of items.” The second batch of errors includes Walmart’s Great Value brand of aluminum foil that has specification information on Walmart.com stating that the product is assembled in the U.S. with U.S. components despite packaging that says it’s a “Product of Armenia.”
 
 
TINA.org reached out to Walmart for comment for this story but the company has not yet responded.
 
The American-made labeling mess comes amid Walmart’s widely publicized effort to purchase an additional $250 billion in American products. Just last week the retailer held a U.S. manufacturing summit to buy up additional U.S.-made products to feature on its shelves and website. It also comes at a time when more than 80 percent of consumers say they are willing to pay more for made in the USA products than their foreign counterparts.
 
Suppliers not supplying answers
TINA.org reached out to several suppliers whose products were mislabeled on Walmart’s site for information about the source of the errors. But many did not respond. Two companies that did respond did not reveal why the inaccurate labels were posted on the Walmart site.
 
Rubbermaid said the company follows the law when it comes to made in the USA claims but conceded that two of the 11 products listed on Walmart.com with the “Made in the USA” badge do not meet the requirements for the unqualified origin claim. USA labels for the two products that Rubbermaid named and that TINA.org listed in the first sampling — a food storage set and a deck box — have been removed from the site. However, the unqualified USA label of another Rubbermaid product included in the original list of 100 remains. That product, a 35-gallon container, has packaging that states in qualifying language that it is “Made in the U.S.A. of Global Components”
 
FTC labeling standards on unqualified claims — like the “Made in the USA” badge affixed to the container — require that a product must be “all or virtually all” made in the U.S.
 
Kimberly-Clark, which had three Depend products that TINA.org found were mislabeled in its initial review of Walmart’s site, told TINA.org that “an investigation is underway with the end goal being to ensure our advertising is accurate.”
 
This is the second complaint TINA.org has filed regarding made in the USA claims. In May, TINA.org alerted the FTC and the New York State Attorney General that Revlon’s ongoing “Almay Simply American” campaign featuring Carrie Underwood was making deceptive made in the USA claims. Almay does not disclose in its TV ads or on its website that more than 95 percent of its products do not meet the legal standard for American-made. Revlon has since employed a new tagline — “Almay The American Look” — in some of its marketing.
 
Find more of our coverage on what made in the USA really means here
 
 

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Why Choosing the Right Surgeon Matters Even More Than You Know
A ProPublica analysis of nearly 17,000 surgeons finds stark differences in complications rates for some of the most routine elective procedures
 
In February 2012, LaVerne Stiles went to Citrus Memorial Hospital near her home in central Florida for what should have been a routine surgery.
 
The bubbly retired secretary had been in a minor car accident weeks earlier. She didn’t worry much about her sore neck until a scan detected a broken bone.
 
The operation she needed, a spinal fusion, is done tens of thousands of times a year without incident. Stiles, 71, had a choice of three specially trained surgeons at Citrus Memorial, which was rated among the top 100 nationally for spinal procedures.
 
She had no way of knowing how much was riding on her decision. The doctor she chose, Constantine Toumbis, had one of the highest rates of complications in the country for spinal fusions. The other two doctors had rates among the lowest for postoperative problems like infections and internal bleeding.
 
It’s conventional wisdom that there are “good” and “bad” hospitals — and that selecting a good one can protect patients from the kinds of medical errors that injure or kill hundreds of thousands of Americans each year.
 
But a ProPublica analysis of Medicare data found that, when it comes to elective operations, it is much more important to pick the right surgeon.
 
Today, we are making public the complication rates of nearly 17,000 surgeons nationwide. Patients will be able to weigh surgeons’ past performance as they make what can be a life-and-death decision. Doctors themselves can see where they stand relative to their peers.
 
The numbers show that the stark differences that Stiles confronted at Citrus Memorial are commonplace across America. Yet many hospitals don’t track the complication rates of individual surgeons and use that data to force improvements. And neither does the government.
 
A small share of doctors, 11 percent, accounted for about 25 percent of the complications. Hundreds of surgeons across the country had rates double and triple the national average. Every day, surgeons with the highest complication rates in our analysis are performing operations in hospitals nationwide. 
 
Subpar performers work even at academic medical centers considered among the nation’s best.
 
A surgeon with one of the nation’s highest complication rates for prostate removals in our analysis operates at Baltimore’s Johns Hopkins Hospital, a national powerhouse known for its research on patient safety. He alone had more complications than all 10 of his colleagues combined — though they performed nine times as many of the same procedures. 
 
By contrast, some of the nation’s best results for knee replacements were turned in by a surgeon at a small-town clinic in Alabama who insists on personally handling even the most menial aspects of each patient’s surgery and follow-up care.
 
ProPublica compared the performance of surgeons by examining five years of Medicare records for eight common elective procedures, including knee and hip replacements, spinal fusions and prostate removals.
 
 
Courtesy: ProPublica

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COMMENTS

ramchandran vishwanathan

1 year ago

Is there a database for Indian Surgeons for specific procedures

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