Leisure, Lifestyle & Wellness
Swachch Mind
Swachch Bharat, a passionate slogan given by prime minister Narendra Modi needs to be coupled with internal cleanliness to produce a new generation of Indians who live for others and Thena Thyakthena Bhunjithaha, that is, they rejoice in giving. For long-term results our educational system must internalise this external and internal cleaning into our curriculum. A clean India is a healthy India which, in turn, is a wealthy India.
 
All of us take a bath daily, maybe even twice daily, to get rid of the dirt, grime, germs and the all the unwanted things from our body’s outer surface to keep ourselves healthy. However, we never try and cleanse the mind which harbours more deadly poisons that could destroy us very easily. The mind is an integral part of the body and resides in every cell in the subatomic quantum level. This quantum concept of the mind explains many of the intricacies of the mind that were hitherto a mystery and did not come under scientific scrutiny. 
 
With advances in quantum physics comes the realisation that the mind (consciousness) is the one which observes everything—even in the most complicated scientific experiments. The human body has between 50-120 trillion cells, each of which has its mind on the cell wall with the antennae ready to receive signals from the universal consciousness (universal mind). While every human cell loves another cell in the body, these body cells also love other living creatures’ cells.
 
The mind, thus defined, is the source of all our thoughts that, in turn, direct all our actions. The mind does not reside in the human brain. There are basically two kinds of thoughts—positive and negative. While the former help the growth and development of the organism, the latter, the negative thoughts, are now known to be at the root of all our ills on this planet, beginning with the simple common cold to the deadly heart attacks, strokes and even cancer, the all-pervasive destroyer!
 
Study after study of the risk factor hypotheses has revealed the vital role played by negative destructive emotions on the major killers. The Johns Hopkins’ student study, the London White Hall study, and the Scandinavian study of men with heart attacks, showed the major role played by frustration, hostility and depression in this disease. Similarly, depression, with or without treatment, came up as the single most dangerous predisposing factor for growth and maintenance of cancers, with anger as the leading cause of stroke! The simple summary is that it is not what one eats that kills him, but it is what eats one that kills him.
 
Indian Yoga and praanaayaama are soaps for cleaning the mind. Regular physical exercise, especially outdoor walking, enjoying the bounties of nature en route would add to the perks. Diet enriched with fruits and vegetables could be an added bonus. Small regular meals, four to five times a day, help keep the internal environment within the limits of healthy fluctuations of the multifarious functions of the body.
 
Man lives for others. Helping others is the rent one pays for the comforts one enjoys in society. Molecular biology has taught us that even the thought of helping others brings on favourable changes in the cells of the immune system to prevent diseases! Praying for others is very effective as shown by a couple of well-controlled prospective studies done in the US. In addition, praying for others helps one to see life in a better perspective. It gives purpose to life and makes life worth living, avoiding depression. The latter is the greatest epidemic of the West these days. Breathe away to happiness and glory! Bath for the mind consists in daily replacing our negative thoughts, like hatred, greed, jealousy, anger and pride, with positive thoughts, like compassion, camaraderie, cooperation, empathy and enthusiasm to work and love.
 
“Cleanliness may be defined to be the emblem of purity of mind.” — Joseph Addison 

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COMMENTS

Jyoti Dua

6 months ago

Excellent article by Prof. Dr B M Hegde. Such articles should be part of Curriculum in our education system. Well done Moneylife for sharing it.

Ramesh Poapt

6 months ago

Absolutely right!

IRDAI's e-commerce proposal to boost online insurance sales
Insurance companies on Saturday said the proposed guidelines on selling and servicing of policies through e-commerce platform are expected to boost online sales of insurance products.
 
The Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDAI) issued a proposed draft on Tuesday for promotion of e-commerce in insurance space and suggested introduction of an Insurance Self-Network Platform, a technology platform.
 
"We expect this (Insurance Self-Network Platform) will help in penetrating of insurance products. It is a revolutionary thing. The technology platform will induce lot of benefits to the customers in terms of accessibility of products that are not encouraged by agents due to lack of adequate remuneration for them," said Bajaj Capital group's CEO and Director Anil Kumar Chopra.
 
"The Insurance Self-Network Platform will undertake insurance e-commerce activities in India such as selling and servicing of insurance products," the draft said.
 
Chopra said the country's cumulative number of issued polices is about 12.5 crore which is abysmally low as compared to India's population. A single person should ideally have multiple policies for different covers like health, motor and life.
 
the state-run National Insurance Company is also exploring e-commerce selling and servicing.
 
"Online selling was there but it lacked proper guidelines. In online space, customers should be able to judge products not only on price point but also on the features and services offered by the company," said the company's Chairman and Managing Director K Sanath Kumar on the sidelines of the Insurance Summit organised by the Indian Chamber of Commerce.
 
"The online sales of policy without any requirement of physical signature process with an authentication process will help customers to buy property insurance and other term policies online at ease and they would not be influenced by agents," he said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

PRABAL BISWAS

5 months ago

I am just waiting for the day when swimming would be taught through e-commerce.
Doing insurance would lead tons of policies getting time barred as normally the nominee is not aware of the policies taken either of the spouse. Person who could be intelligent will never go through e commerce. Who processes his nominees on claim on death? Employees of e-commerce site? I would always prefer to go online with the insurance co and his representative . Tall talks in the regulatory world is a fashion. Wait and see....

Once called 'orphan crops', pulses and millets are new stars
Once relegated to the status of "orphan crops", pulses and millets are currently a subject of tremendous interest among the global community. Pulse crops, millets and a host of other local cereals, vegetables, and fruits are of vital importance to the world's poor.
 
It is no surprise, therefore, that development agencies working in the area of agriculture -- like mine -- have moved beyond the traditional "stars" of food research - grains such as wheat, rice, and corn - and expanded the scope of its research around agriculture to include pulses and millets.
 
Remarkable progress has been made in decreasing the proportion of poor and hungry people globally over the past decade. However, feeding an estimated nine billion people with safe and nutritious food by the year 2050 remains a significant challenge for agricultural research, development, and policies -- especially given the obstacles of climate change, increased demand, and volatile prices.
 
To increase the sector's productivity and gradual transition towards economically viable small and medium-scale farming, particularly in South Asia and Africa, there is a great need to develop and scale up innovations specifically suited for the nearly 800 million small-scale farming families globally.
 
Food security is achieved, in part, through focussed and practical research. There is clear evidence that science and research can increase food supply and play a key role in the fight against poverty. According to the World Bank, agricultural growth is twice as effective at reducing poverty as non-agricultural growth because most of the world's poor live in rural areas.
 
This means that millets, including pulses, cannot be overlooked as these are part of the traditional diet of several developing regions of the world.
 
Over the past few months, at a number of conferences supported during the International Year of Pulses, the point has been brought home time and time again. In Canada, pulses were once a crop with low production and relatively minimal research attention. No longer. Advances in agricultural sciences and a vibrant international market have turned the Canadian pulse sector into a major world player.
 
Pulses are staple foods in many regions of the world. They diversify income and food sources for the poor in developing countries -- they are rich in micronutrients and serve as the key source of protein that is far more affordable than animal protein.
 
Many pulse crops grow well in dry conditions and can provide a hedge against the negative effects of climate change, a major concern in India and throughout South Asia. Pulses therefore have a relatively low "water footprint".
 
Despite the clear benefits of pulses, production remains stagnant. In some countries, including the ones where the population is growing fastest, and where pulses are consumed in the greatest quantities, pulse production is actually declining.
 
India has been the largest producer of pulses in the world. However, what is of concern is that India's per hectare yield has not increased in the past two decades. This is a key challenge for the pulse sector.
 
What is preventing farmers, especially small-holders growing crops on one-two hectares of land, from expanding production? What will it take to see voluntary uptake of these crops? How can the private sector become more involved? And where can research help?
 
At this juncture, a convergence between the academic world and the real world is the need of the hour. It is imperative to harness the power of both scientific and farmer-based knowledge in order to develop the right crops, tools, techniques and expertise for smallholder farmers and their communities.
 
Many smallholder farmers already have extensive knowledge of crop production as they have vast inherited knowledge. In many cases they simply need a boost to supplement their ongoing efforts -- this could include access to affordable technologies, to new techniques that have been proven in similar circumstances, or to markets and information.
 
Regrettably, there remains little plant research targeted to pulse crops in many Asian countries. This often results in farmers having difficulty finding good quality seed, coping with crop diseases and dealing with numerous challenges to maintain productivity.
 
The multi-pronged strategy to deal with this would need investment in research and on-the-ground solutions. One of the most critical needs is to find the fastest and most effective ways of taking research products to scale.
 
The challenge is great, but the opportunities are enormous. Most importantly, pulses are no longer orphan crops -- they have been adopted by the global community and it will not be long before results appear.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

Anil Kulkarni

6 months ago

Traditional pulses were grown because they suited the climate and soil of the region. We Indians have been forced to adopt alien crops like wheat into a soil and climate that is not really suited for it. Its good to see that we are going back to food that suits our region.

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