Stock Manipulation
Stock manipulation: Vijay Textiles

Vijay Textiles claims to manufacture bed-linen, curtain fabrics and upholstery. For the four quarters ended December 2015, it reported sales of Rs91.64 crore, down 15% from Rs107.62 crore reported for the same period a year ago. In each of the past four calendar years, the textiles manufacturer has reported a net loss. In the year ended December 2015, it reported a net loss of Rs8.87 crore compared to a loss of Rs6.50 crore reported for the year ended December 2014. The promoters hold a 59.83% stake in the company; almost the entire stake (98%) is pledged. Vijay Textiles has a total debt of Rs170 crore which is nearly three times its equity. But, despite its poor financials, the stock price shot up from Rs4.52 on 26 June 2015 to Rs29.55 on 31 May 2016—a rise of 554%. In just the past couple of months, the price has shot up 64%, from Rs18 on 30 March 2016. In January 2016, the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) sought a clarification on the suspicious price movement to which Vijay Textiles replied that there were ‘no extraordinary events’ that led to the massive increase in price. Vijay Textiles is not new to such suspicious price movements of its stock. Unfortunately, the regulator, too, has been ineffective in penalising manipulators. In January 2011, the Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) imposed a fine of merely Rs25 lakh on the promoters for having indulged in issuance of misleading corporate announcements. However, this was set aside later, after an appeal to the Securities Appellate Tribunal (SAT). For the period between November 2004 and March 2005, it was alleged that certain entities created artificial volume in the scrip leading to a wide price fluctuations which did not have any correlation with the performance of the company. However, SEBI dismissed the case as there was no conclusive evidence. Thanks to the regulators, the market has become price-riggers’ paradise.

User

Health Insurance: HDFC Life Easy Health
HDFC Life’s Easy Health is a combination of daily hospital cash benefit (DHCB), surgical...
Premium Content
Monthly Digital Access

Subscribe

Already A Subscriber?
Login
Yearly Digital+Print Access

Subscribe

Moneylife Magazine Subscriber or MSSN member?
Login

Yearly Subscriber Login

Enter the mail id that you want to use & click on Go. We will send you a link to your email for verficiation
Many Beneficiaries of SEBI’s Forced Delisting of Companies
The Securities & Exchange Board of India (SEBI) has finally got around to announcing plans to force over 4,200 companies to delist from the bourses. These are companies whose shares have been suspended for over seven years by the two national exchanges (1,200 companies), or those which were exclusively listed on de-notified regional exchanges (3,000 companies). According to SEBI, the companies will have to offer an exit option to investors this fiscal. 
 
The exit will be at a fair value which will be determined by a third-party valuer appointed by the bourses. Promoters, who do not cooperate with the regulator or fail to provide an exit option to investors, could face the prospect of being barred from raising funds from the capital market or from taking up board positions.
 
What the SEBI chairman did not mention at the press conference where this was announced is that the MS Sahoo committee, set up under SEBI’s own whole-time director had recommended action against promoters, directors and compliance officers of 2,048 companies for failing to comply with listing agreements way back in 2010, but no action was initiated. 
 
While SEBI’s decision is laudable, everything depends on implementation. If managed well, the number of companies listed on our bourses will drop sharply from around 8,000-odd companies (as of March 2015). In all likelihood, SEBI’s plan to act on this issue has been prompted by a special leave petition filed by the Midas Touch Investors Association (MTIA) in the Supreme Court which would have come up for hearing some time soon. Let’s look at how the decision will benefit various stakeholders.
 
Retail investors have been angry about trading of several stocks being suspended for years on end for non-compliance with listing norms. Investors who have dematerialised shares end up paying demat charges every year for shares that have no market. Although SEBI says re-materialisation (conversion of electronic shares back to a paper certificate) of shares is an option, the high cost makes it a meaningless alternative. Virendra Jain, founder of MTIA, points to the plight of companies listed on regional bourses. He says, de-recognised bourses were asked submit details of companies listed exclusively on them to SEBI, but it did not initiate any follow-up action, although only 500 companies have got re-listed on the national exchanges under a SEBI plan. Further, in his reckoning, a whopping Rs58,000 crore is blocked in just 1,450 companies that have been suspended for over seven years only by the BSE (Bombay Stock Exchange) and the NSE (National Stock Exchange). On including companies listed on regional bourses that are either defunct or denotified, the amount blocked would go as high as Rs1.5 lakh crore, he says.  
 
India’s oldest bourse, the BSE has long been complaining about the onerous burden it faces due to the legacy listing of over 5,500 companies. The listing fees in these cases is a pittance compared to the responsibility of monitoring compliance with the listing agreement which has increased manifold in the past two decades. On the other hand, the NSE started operations with a selected group of companies and, even today, it has only 1,696 companies listed on it. The BSE will be a big beneficiary of the move to weed out 4,200 listed stocks and probably make it more attractive investment as it prepares to go public this year. 
 
SEBI itself has been facing flak from a Supreme Court-appointed committee for its failure to stop rampant price manipulation in little-known, penny stocks, for tax avoidance. SEBI chairman, UK Sinha, is quoted in the media as saying that this move will help the regulator “get rid of many shell companies which were being used by promoters and market operators to manipulate stocks. It will help ease the regulatory burden.” While reducing the number of listed companies will, indeed, improve regulatory oversight, it is not clear how actively traded or manipulated companies can be considered shell companies if they are fully compliant with listing norms, disclosures and fees. Neither SEBI nor the bourses show any interest in rampant price manipulation and money laundering that is routine in Indian bourses. Moneylife has been writing about one such case in each issue for the past several years. It remains to be seen how the threat of punitive action actually plays out and whether companies opt to pay investors and exit price and delist shares or comply with the rules and resume trading. 

User

COMMENTS

Vaibhav Dhoka

8 months ago

SEBI should issue timetable about same and monitor same,otherwise issue will be dumped below carpet.

jaideep shirali

8 months ago

I feel that between them, the regulators seem to be destroying the very markets they are supposed to monitor. The FD market has been hit by administrative fiat, as companies that would possibly have not defaulted, were hit by an asset liability mismatch plus liquidity problems and defaulted, even when the same companies rolled over FDs in earlier years without problems. If SEBI implements this compulsory delisting, it will destroy the equity markets. Investors know that a small percentage of companies would have been hit by genuine business problems, the majority of promoters would get away by quoting valuations that possibly would not even touch the face value of the shares. It would leave investors wondering whether they should invest in equities at all, if the regulator takes the attitude of eliminating the malady, rather than finding ways to treat it. Sadly, both the debt and equity markets, which need more attention, are neglected, with attention diverted to peripheral issues. This attitude would drive investors back to deposits, an investment that lags inflation. For entrepreneurs, this would mean the so called Make in India is just a pipe dream, as they would neither find equity investors, nor the NPA scarred bankers, ready to fund their businesses.

manoharlalsharma

8 months ago

Many Beneficiaries of SEBI’s Forced Delisting of Companies/instead of d'list it should be TRADED / AUCTIONED/TAKOVERS or MERGED with powerful compnise so to protect interest of lacs of investors.

Vaibhav Dhoka

8 months ago

One does not understand why SEBI is not initiating or afraid of taking action or prosecute non complying directors.Or is regulator Hand in Glove with defaulters.

sankaran

8 months ago

In our country there are laws for each and everything.But where is the rule of law?!!

saji cherian

8 months ago

Leave alone little known companies, there are several instances of companies promoted by well regarded promoters leaving shareholders in the lurch. . For instance, AKG ACOUSTICS LTD. , promoted by Philips India Ltd., was delisted without informing the shareholders.

saji cherian

8 months ago

Leave alone little known companies, there are several instances of companies promoted by well regarded promoters leaving shareholders in the lurch. . For instance, AKG ACOUSTICS LTD. , promoted by Philips India Ltd., was delisted without informing the shareholders.

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)