Nation
Somnath Bharti arrested for damaging AIIMS property
Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) legislator Somnath Bharti was arrested on on charges of damaging AIIMS property and misbehaving with its security guards, the police said.
 
Bharti was arrested from his residence and was taken to the Hauz Khas Police Station. 
 
The Delhi Police had registered an FIR against Bharti and his supporters on September 11 following the complaint of All India Institute of Medical Sciences' (AAIMS) Chief Security Officer R.S. Rawat. 
 
Rawat, in his written complaint said that Bharti, around 9.45 a.m. on September 9 "provoked the mob to damage the fence of government property (AIIMS)".
 
Rawat had further alleged that Bharti gave permission to unauthorised persons with JCB machines to get access inside AIIMS from Gautam Nagar Nallah road side and misbehaved with security personnel. 
 
In the complaint, it was also alleged that six security personnel were injured while trying to intervene and stop Bharti and his supporters from damaging AIIMS property. 
 
Bharti and his supporters were booked under Sections 147 (rioting), 148 (rioting, armed with deadly weapons), 186 (obstructing public servant), 353 (assault or criminal force to deter public servant) of Indian Penal Code (IPC) and Prevention of Damage to Public Property Act. 
 
Bharti, however, had termed the allegations "wrong". 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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Uri attack: Limited military options with India, say experts
Despite the clamour for retaliatory action to Sunday's daring cross-border terror attack from Pakistan on an army base at Uri in Jammu and Kashmir that claimed the lives of 18 soldiers, experts and analysts are of the view that India has limited military options and should look for other paths.
 
"At best, if the (Indian) army finds Pakistani soldiers exposed on the other side of the border, they can target them with artillery fire and small arms fire," Ajai Sahni, counter-terrorism expert and Executive Director of the Institute for Conflict Management, told IANS here.
 
"There are no military options available because military capacity in India has been eroded by the lack of investments and by corruption over the decades," he said.
 
The India Army has blamed the Pakistan-based terrorist outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM) for the early morning attack.
 
The Uri attack comes in the middle of large-scale violence in the Kashmir Valley in which nearly 90 lives have been lost in the wake of the killing of Hizbul Mujahideen terrorist Burhan Wani last July.
 
Stating that the present government has also done little to correct the imbalance in defence capabilities, Sahni said: "Unless capacities are enormously augmented, our strategic options will remain severely restricted."
 
According to C Uday Bhaskar, security analyst and Director, Society for Policy Studies, "emotive rhetoric cannot replace resolute action" on the ground. "India has a modest range of military options -- tri-service and not just army -- which has been conveyed to the political apex in the aftermath of Mumbai 2008," Bhaskar said.
 
"Yes, there will be costs incurred -- human and material -- but the objective is to inflict heavy punishment on the Pakistan military and Delhi must remain resolute in staying the course."
 
These comments come even as a leading English daily in Pakistan carried a report on Wednesday saying that India was preparing to attack selected targets and that Islamabad was "ready to thwart any adventure".
 
"War-mongering India has completed the first phase of its preparations to attack selected targets inside Pakistan under the Cold Start war doctrine," The News International said in its report. Citing sources, it said that although Pakistan would not initiate an attack, it would respond with full force in case of any strike by India.
 
Sahni dismissed the Pakistani news report as "wildly speculative". As for the high-decibel debates on Indian television channels seeking quick action on the part of India, Bhaskar had this to say: "The current cacophony in the audio-visual and social media platforms diminishes the Indian profile."
 
Strategic affairs expert of the Bharatshakti.in defence portal Nitin Gokhale also dismissed the Pakistani news report saying it was borne out of paranoia and "to create panic in the international community". "India has started utilising its first option by launching a diplomatic offensive to isolate Pakistan internationally," Gokhale said.
 
According to Gokhale, the second option is for India to revisit the 1960 Indus Waters Treaty. The treaty was signed out of Pakistan's fear that since the source rivers of the Indus basin were in India, it could potentially create droughts and famines in Pakistan during times of war.
 
"As for the military option, I would rather leave it to the military professionals and political executive," he said.
 
Reflecting Sahni's view, Gokhale said that Indian forces can disregard the existing ceasefire and pound those military garrisons and posts on the other side of the Line of Control in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir "which facilitate, train and equip non-state actors and serve as launch pads for terror attacks".
 
According to Ashish Shukla, Researcher in the Institute of Defence Studies and and Analysis and editor of the Pakistan News Digest, India should prepare for a response taking various factors into account.
 
"It should be well thought out and should not appear to be a knee-jerk reaction," Shukla, author of the book "Deadly Connection" that deals with Pakistan's relations with the US post-9/11, said.
 
According to Bhaskar, given the nuclear backdrop between India and Pakistan, "the escalation dynamic is inherent but both simulation and war-gaming point to Rawalpindi staying within the matrix of rational behavior".
 
"But India has to invest in and acquire the capability to pursue the punish-the-perpetrator option," he said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

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COMMENTS

Thayavalapil Kyprat

3 months ago

Unless Ministry of Defense, Govt of India take immediate steps to ban supply The supply of cheap IMFL (Indian Made Foreign Liquor) to all Army, Navy and Airforce men and women on duty, from the Defense Canteen shops, must be stopped immediately. Most of our soldiers have now become addicted to alcohol and they are not in a position to perform their duties effectively. They are not even able to defend their own camps located at 6- 8 KM from the Pakistan border. Then, how are they going to defend the unarmed civilians of this country ?? I sincerely request and appeal to all authorities in India's Defense sector, to re-think about this cheap liquor supply policy in India's Defence establishments and BAN it . We must keep our soldiers in good mental and physical condition and weaned away from alcohol abuse.

REPLY

PS Bindra

In Reply to Thayavalapil Kyprat 2 months ago

I don't know, what is your experience and qualification while you make such a comment, I can only pity you!

Thayavalapil Kyprat

In Reply to PS Bindra 2 months ago

I am the ex-Principal Project Officer of Indian Institute of Technology, Madras. My qualifications are B.Sc,B.E. and MBA with over 30 years experience in Project Management. Out of this 17 years of work experience abroad. I am a tax- payer to our nation and I know very well this "highly subsidised liquor vending" policy to India's military soldiers and their families is a grave concern to national security. This liquor policy was introduced by the British Raj, a few centuries ago, to recruit Indian youths into their police force and British Army . This liquor policy must reviewed and curtailed. Thanks !

Nilesh KAMERKAR

3 months ago

Media reports from LOC & UNGA suggest otherwise . . . Mera Desh Badal Raha Hai!!

shadi katyal

3 months ago

It is evident that while we ared on big purchase od defence equipment we have faikled to provide siple things lijke night goggles or protective arm reisiting Kelver vest. Indian army is willing to sacrifice their lives for the nation but it is the nation which has failed them so far.
Pakistan is well aware of our draw back and thus taking advanae opf such incursions but what boggles one mind is that with due intellegence report our officers failed to take it seriously. How could terroprist cut the barbed wires ionb 2 places and march into inner territory and thus kill 18 jawans. How long this attitude of SUB CHALTA HAI BHAI can go on in the defence. Did we not learn from Pathankiot or even Mumbai.
Yes India is a soft point and Pakistan will continue such cuts and bleed policy as has been goingon for decades. Let us see how new AVATAR can change any. Blaming the past will not wash the blood of these martyrs

Thayavalapil Kyprat

3 months ago

The first step that must be taken by the military high command is to ban the highly subsidized supply of alcohol to the Indian soldier and airmen working in these sensitive camps. The supply of liquor bottles to Indians, was done by the British Raj as "bribe" to
obtain men into their British Army. Now-a-days, every soldier and military officer, gulps a few pegs before dinner and going to bed. This alcohol comsumption has become a high problem. This free subsidized liquor policy at work place, must be banned.

REPLY

Arunkumar A Vijayan

In Reply to Thayavalapil Kyprat 3 months ago

Fully agree...well said

Government approves Rafale deal
The government on Wednesday approved the deal with France for purchase of 36 Rafale fighter jets, sources said.
 
The deal was approved by the Cabinet Committee on Security.
 
The government, however, chose to stay mum over the issue with no official words coming from the government or defence ministry.
 
Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, asked about the deal at the briefing on cabinet decisions, dodged the question and said the matter was not listed in the cabinet. 
 
The sources said the an inter-governmental agreement, which could not be signed during French President Francois Hollande's visit in January, is likely to be signed on Friday by Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar and French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian.
 
According to sources, the deal will cost 7.87 billion euros, after tough negotiation from the Indian side which led to delay in finalisation of the deal, which includes weapons and spares apart from 36 jets in flyaway condition. 
 
This also includes air-to-air Meteor missiles. 
 
The deal also has a 50% offset clause, which will bring investments to India. 
 
A team from France was present in the national capital since last few weeks and hectic negotiations were on for conclusion of the deal.
 
According to sources, the Prime Minister's Office has pushed for concluding the deal early, after more than year-long negotiations, during which the price was a major sticking point.
 
In 2012, India decided to ink a deal for 126 Rafale jets.
 
As the deal could not work out, another deal for purchasing 36 Rafale combat jets in fly-away condition was inked during Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to France in April last year.
 
Both the sides also agreed to conclude an inter-governmental agreement for supply of the aircraft after which a negotiating team was constituted.
 
Drian arrives on Thursday evening along with CEOs of Dassault Aviation, Thales and MBDA and top government officials.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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