Stocks
Sensex, Nifty may be on a short uptrend: Thursday Closing Report

The Nifty has to stay above 5,670 tomorrow to keep the upmove intact. However, a close below 5,590 may signal a fresh downtrend
 

The domestic market settled off the highs of the day on lower-than-expected current account deficit figures, which led to the strengthening of the rupee. The Nifty has to stay above 5,670 tomorrow to keep the upmove intact. However, a close below 5,590 may signal a fresh downtrend. The National Stock Exchange (NSE) reported a higher volume of 74.60 crore shares on account of the expiry of the June F&O contract. The advance-decline ratio was 728:640.

 

The market opened on a firm note on supportive global cues as markets in Asia were higher on hopes that the reassurances by the Chinese central bank will yield results and speculations that the US Federal Reserve will continue with its stimulus package. Back home, the F&O contract expiry is expected to keep the market volatile.

 

The Nifty opened 59 points higher at 5,648 and the Sensex resumed trade at 18,716, a jump of 164 points over its previous close. Buying in heavyweights and banking stocks and lower current account deficit numbers for the March quarter kept the momentum in the morning session.

 

Current account deficit (CAD) for the March quarter was $18.1 billion, or 3.6% of GDP, lower than expected and below the $21.7 billion deficit a year earlier. CAD for the full fiscal year ending in March 2013 was $87.8 billion, or 4.8% of GDP, compared with $78.2 billion (4.2%) a year earlier.

 

Profit taking in consumer durables, capital goods, fast moving consumer goods and power stocks led the market led the market to its lows, albeit in the positive terrain, in noon trade. The Nifty fell to 5,631 and the Sensex slipped to 18,688 at their respective lows.

 

Gains in oil & gas, healthcare and IT sectors pushed the market higher in the post-noon session.  The benchmarks hit their highs in the last hour of trade with the Nifty rising to 5.699 and the Sensex moving up to 18,926.

 

The market settled slightly off the highs powered by gains in oil & gas stocks as the Centre is expected to look at hiking gas prices later today. The Nifty closed 94 points (1.68%) higher at 5,682 and the Sensex finished the session at 18,876, a gain of 324 points (1.75%).

 

While the broader indices also ended in the green, they underperformed the Sensex today. The BSE Mid-cap index rose 0.26% and the BSE Small-cap index gained 0.32%.

 

Barring the BSE Consumer Durables (down 1.08%) and BSE Capital Goods (down 0.04%), all other sectoral gauges settled higher. The top gainers were BSE Oil & Gas (up 3.22%); BSE IT (up 3.15%); BSE TECk (up 2.70%); BSE Healthcare (up 2.49%) and BSE Realty (up 1.80%).

 

Out of the 30 stocks on the Sensex, 20 stocks settled higher. The chief gainers were ONGC (up 4.14%); TCS (up 3.85%); HDFC Bank (up 3.62%); Sun Pharmaceutical Industries (up 3.54%) and Reliance Industries (up 3.48%). The major losers were Maruti Suzuki (down 1.61%); Tata Motors (up 1.35%); NTPC (down 0.53%); Coal India (down 0.49%) and BHEL (down 0.37%).

 

The top two A Group gainers on the BSE were—JSW Energy (up 7.42%) and Jaiprakash Power Ventures (up 6.53%).

The top two A Group losers on the BSE were—Gitanjali Gems (down 9.99%) and MMTC (down 4.96%).

 

The top two B Group gainers on the BSE were—Alka India (up 20%) and Objectone Information Systems (up 19.82%).

The top two B Group losers on the BSE were—Hanung Toys (down 19.64%) and Vardhman Industries (down 13.37%).

 

Of the 50 stocks on the Nifty, 39 ended in the in the green. The major gainers were Cairn India (up 5.76%); DLF (up 5.19%); UltraTech Cement (up 4.69%); ONGC (up 4.23%) and HCL Technologies (up 3.51%). The key losers were IDFC (down 1.40%); Maruti Suzuki (down 1.39%); Grasim Industries (down 0.86%); Punjab National Bank (down 0.68%) and NTPC (down .60%).

 

Markets in Asia settled mostly higher as assurance from the People’s Bank of China to boost liquidity helped soothe investor sentiment. Besides, slower-than-expected economic growth reports, which gave rise to speculations that the US Fed may not cut its stimulus programme, also lent support.

 

The Hang Seng gained 0.50%; the Jakarta Composite surged 1.92%; the KLSE Composite advanced 0.62%; the Nikkei 225 jumped 2.96%; the Straits Times rose 0.44%; the Seoul Composite climbed 2.87% and the Taiwan Weighted settled 1.27% higher. On the other hand, the Shanghai Composite lost 0.08%.

 

At the time of writing, the key European indices were trading with small gains and the US stock futures were modestly higher.

 

Back home, foreign institutional investors were net sellers of stocks aggregating Rs547.79 crore on Wednesday while domestic institutional investors were net buyers of shares amounting to Rs336.97 crore.

 

Kalpataru Power Transmission (KPTL) today said it has secured new orders worth over Rs 1,130 crore in international and domestic markets. The contracts include two projects worth Rs500 crore in Zambia, for supply and erection of 330 KV transmission line of 446 km, and from Power Grid worth around Rs330 crore for supply and erection of 765 KV D/C transmission line of 140 km. The stock advanced 1.51% to close at 7.10 on the NSE.

 

Sanghi Industries has drawn up plans to invest Rs275 crore in the next 18 months. While Sanghi Cement makers will invest Rs150 crore on acquiring ships and setting up new jetties/terminals, Rs125 crore would be spent on enhancing capacity at its Kutch plant. The stock declined 1.18% to Rs16.80 on the NSE.

User

SEBI’s system of reporting PMS data continues to be frustratingly anti-investor

While SEBI has made information related to PMS available on its website, only monthly data from January is available. What investors really need is historical performance. SEBI continues to ensure that investors find it impossible to get any useful historical performance data

 

Following pressure from Moneylife through a Right to Information (RTI) application and appeals, the Securities Exchange Board of India (SEBI) has started uploading information of performance from Portfolio Management Services (PMS). But this information is of no value because it is merely monthly performance starting from January. SEBI has not uploaded information that investors really need—long-term performance, say three years. This is surprising because SEBI is certainly aware of the importance of trend data.
Vide Master Circular SEBI/IMD/MC No.3/10554/2012, SEBI mandates mutual funds to disclose performance data on basis of yearly, three years, five years and since inception. However, we find that there is no such exhaustive data pertaining to each PMS’s historical performance. We find that only monthly performance is disclosed online and that too only from January 2013 onwards. This means, there’s no way to know how a PMS has performed in the last one year!
 

It is pertinent to note that the minimum amount required to invest in PMS companies is Rs25 lakh. This calls for some serious homework on not only the investors’ part but also advisors’ too. But, alas, the different systems adopted by SEBI makes it nearly impossible for investors (or advisors) to take an informed decision. Why does SEBI have different systems for reporting for PMS and mutual funds? What is more interesting is that SEBI has mandated that PMS companies disclose their performance and assets under management (AUM) for the preceding three years (on annual basis, not monthly). But even this has not been uploaded on SEBI’s website! The link can be accessed here (http://www.sebi.gov.in/sebiweb/investment/PMRReport.jsp). SEBI has mandated that PMS companies must disclose information for last three years on their respective websites (but more on this later).
 

According to Section 14(iv) of the Securities and Exchange Board of India (Portfolio Managers) Regulations, 1993 (The Regulations), PMS companies should disclose “the performance of the portfolio manager provided that the performance of a discretionary portfolio manager shall be calculated using weighted average method taking each individual category of investments for the immediately preceding three years (emphasis ours) and in such cases performance indicators shall also be disclosed.” There is absolutely no mention of historical returns or returns for period more than three years, let alone returns since inception. Whereas mutual funds must disclose returns for one year, three years, five years AND returns since inception, as per SEBI’s mutual fund regulations.
 

Earlier, Moneylife had fought hard and won a case against SEBI in which the Central Information Commissioner (CIC) had ruled that SEBI has to upload data of PMS schemes onto its website. Shockingly, it was found out that the monthly report uploaded not only did not contain historical data, but the format at which SEBI uploaded made it nearly impossible to download and compare with other PMS schemes, unlike mutual funds. To make matters worse, only one report at a time (i.e. one company and one month) can be viewed (and not downloaded). If you want to ‘download’ PMS data off SEBI’s website, you will have to copy and paste manually which is an extremely tedious task. Therefore, if you want to make an informed decision to compare and contrast, say more than 20 PMS schemes, it is simply not feasible to do it within a reasonable time frame. There are 250 PMS schemes in total.
 

Moreover, SEBI mandates PMS companies to disclose performance-related and other information on each respective PMS on their respective websites. Most PMS companies have neatly tucked away the ‘disclosure document’ in some corner of their website, which can be hard to locate. Unfortunately, one usually needs to be tech-savvy to locate this document. On the other hand, most mutual funds companies provide this facility of checking their performance online, with relative ease of access.
 

For the time being, investors will have to choose to keep the Rs25 lakh on hold until SEBI and PMS companies make it easier for them to access the information.
 

Moneylife sent an email to SEBI and asked how investors can get data of historical performance of PMS. Till the time of writing this story, we have not received any answers from them. We will incorporate their answers as and when we receive it.

User

COMMENTS

Sandeepan Bose

4 years ago

Moneylife seems to be more into Insurance, Could we have a write up on PMS schemes and their comparision in Moneylife now that the numbers are available.

REPLY

Sucheta Dalal

In Reply to Sandeepan Bose 4 years ago

You need to read more of Moneylife. We have been filing RTI and have WON a major victory with the central information commission for making PMS data public.

Do read.

gcmbinty

4 years ago

Months! Will I survive that long?

Jigar Shah

4 years ago

SEBI is asking PMS service provider for long term performance data and It will add it in next few months on their website.

REPLY

240p FLV

In Reply to Jigar Shah 4 years ago

Thanks. But how do you know that?

Suiketu Shah

In Reply to Jigar Shah 4 years ago

why does it take so much time to give the data.This is 1 days work for PMS provider.Obviously they wish to manipulate the data and give it as every PMS provier worth his salt gives a negative return and noone gives references.

gcmbinty

4 years ago

You are giving me an opportunity to reiterate my concern that the regulators must not be the custodians of the consumers or investors money in any of the so called education and awareness programmes for all the more reasons that such monies becomes refundable to consumers/investors because of their being incomplete or foul business transactions. Regulators job is to regulate the business movement and get justice to consumers, but not to appropriate consumers' money to themselves in the name of consumer education and awareness. These regulators whether in equity investment, banks (RBI), insurance (IRDA), income tax, sales tax, provident, et al have no business to interfere with the transactional issues when they do not have the powers to adjudicate on the consumer complaints as in the case consumer forums.

Suiketu Shah

4 years ago

hdfc bank claims on sebis' links page they have no PMS clients!When they are so useless that they claim themselves to have no pms clients why would anyone want to use their wealth management services!!!!!!!?

REPLY

Jigar Shah

In Reply to Suiketu Shah 4 years ago

HDFC Mutual fund does PMS activity so HDFC bank does not any PMS client. SO HDFC MF / AMC is largest PMS service provider and not HDFC bank

Suiketu Shah

In Reply to Jigar Shah 4 years ago

It would help if you can describe yr designation and name of company you work for since it seems you are working for HDFC Bank and replying on their behalf.

Jigar Shah

In Reply to Suiketu Shah 4 years ago

I do not work for HDFC group, I looked at data given in sebi PMS links.

Debashis Basu

In Reply to Suiketu Shah 4 years ago

Dear Mr Suketu Shah,
This is completely uncalled for personal attack. EVEN IF Mr JIGAR SHAH IS WORKING FOR HDFC BANK that does not necessarily make him evil. Moneylife is interested in facts and truth alone. Mr Jigar Shah has made an important point. If you find ways of contradicting his fact, please do. It does not help to imagine things and impute motives. We apologise to Mr Jigar Shah

ramanathan dwarakanathan

4 years ago

This is very unfair.

gcmbinty

4 years ago

What standards of their investors' education is when their data is unreliable - extending to misleading information? Under these conditions should the funds created and invested in SEBI for Investors' Education be continued to be in their hands?

sathyacumaran

4 years ago

sathya cumaran
its not only PMS but all the investors in the various stock broking firms they have been mapped in online trading as well offline trading if the client is offline trader then online trading is managed by the broking house itself there is parallel accounting the loss is booked in either account is booked to concerned cleints accounts and profit is booked for stock broking account so the pms is not the only scam there many but this is not our motto or expose but we need justice and transperancy

NCDRC slaps Rs50,000 fine on Sahara for lapse in tracking investor’s payment

The NCDRC passed the order while pulling up Sahara for not updating its accounts regarding the repayment of a loan availed by one of its investors against the investment he had made in the scheme

The National consumer redressal commission has penalised Sahara India with a fine of Rs50,000 for failing to put in place a proper accounting system to keep track of the money invested by people in one of its schemes.

 

“It is indeed a sad state of affairs where the petitioner was taking money for the scheme launched by them (Sahara) for the benefit of the customers and they failed to put in place a proper accounting system to support this scheme,” the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission (NCDRC) said.

 

The NCDRC passed the order while pulling up Sahara for not updating its accounts regarding the repayment of a loan availed by one of its investors against the investment he had made in the scheme.

 

According to Jatakishore Das, he had invested Rs1 lakh in Sahara’s Swarna Yojana Scheme and availed a loan of Rs80,000.

 

Das, who resides in Odisha’s Deogarh district, claimed that he had repaid the loan with interest and it was endorsed in his passbook-cum-certificate by then branch/scheme manager of Sahara India’s Deogarh branch.

 

On the other hand, Sahara contended that the loan availed by Das was outstanding as its alleged repayment was not shown in the company’s ledgers.

 

The petitioner’s claim, however, was upheld by the district forum and the Odisha State Commission in their orders against which Sahara India had moved NCDRC.

 

The NCDRC bench presided justice VB Gupta, while slapping the fine of Rs50,000 on Sahara, found “no jurisdictional error, illegality or infirmity” in the state commission’s order and dismissed the company's plea.

 

The bench observed that if the company had indeed been keeping their accounts accurate, “they would not need to plead ignorance of entries regarding respondent’s (Das) loan in the passbook-cum-certificate due to lack of corresponding entry in the ledger book of the petitioner.”

 

It directed Sahara to pay half of the fine amount to Das and deposit the remaining in the consumer welfare fund.

User

COMMENTS

ashwin bahl

4 years ago

too little!

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