Secure Your Home
Insurance for valuables at home is a neglected cover in India, even though it is popular in the US and Western countries. Home theft or chain-snatching on the road gives a wake-up call. Home break-ins are often reported in newspapers for which home insurance can be a help. But we need to know the fine print. If a house is unoccupied for a long period (usually 30 days), the claim may be rejected. Insurance for covering your jewellery and valuables at home is still worth considering. You may extend it to cover valuables in bank lockers too. The premium is affordable. If you wish to cover eventualities like chain-snatching or employee theft, you need all-risk cover which can be a tad pricey. Raj Pradhan as usual, has dived deep into this under-researched area and offered you a guide for decision-making.
 
The Modi government will complete a year in office this month. The government had raised high expectations but now there is a sense of confusion about its priorities. Sucheta, in her Different Strokes column, asks a pertinent question, given the widespread disaffection with the Modi government: Who is the Modi sarkar working for?
 
The Securities & Exchange Board of India (SEBI) is never proactive in addressing investor issues. Sucheta, in her Crosshairs column, provides additional evidence: Virendra Jain of Midas Touch Investors’ Association needed to threaten SEBI with a public interest litigation to get companies to re-list on national exchanges, companies that were listed on the now closed regional stock exchanges. Most alarming is the case of a company like Helios and Matheson which Sucheta has been writing about for a long time. It’s openly flouting SEBI’s norms; but no action has been taken by the regulator so far.
 
Stocks are considered highly risky. But it is cash that is the risky asset, says Warren Buffett. Turn to our Earning Curve section to read his take on risk. Enjoy reading and keep writing in with your views and suggestions.

User

IAF fetches nearly 2,000 Indians back from Nepal
The Indian Air Force has fetched 1,935 Indian back from Kathmandu to New Delhi since late Saturday even as its personnel continued with "Operation Maitri" in quake-hit Nepal overnight despite inclement weather, Sitanshu Kar, spokesperson for defence ministry, said on Monday.
 
"As of now, the IAF has evacuated 1,935 passengers from Kathmandu utilising 12 aircraft sorties," he said. 
 
"The IAF continued its operations last night despite odds." 
 
Quoting the Indian embassy in Kathmandu, the spokesperson for India's external affairs ministry, Vikas Swarup, said, Indians will now also be evacuated by busses from Pokhra, a hill resort in the Nepal, to Raxaul in Bihar. 
 
"Fourteen civilian flights -- seven scheduled and seven special -- will operate today (Monday) from Kathmandu to Delhi," he said.
 
The latest plane to land in New Delhi from Kathmandu was a C-17 with 291 passengers on board at 06.30 a.m. 
 
In Nepal, IAF personnel had concluded by 8.00 a.m. the five aborted sorties that could not be be undertaken on Sunday due to fresh aftershocks and seven more.
 
As fresh tremors continued in the early hours of Monday, the Rapid Action Medical Team of the IAF was ready with medicines and equipment to open a first aid unit at Lagankhel on the outskirts of the airport in Kathmandu, Kar said.
 
"Three doctors and 25 paramediccs will man the centre," he said adding that six medical teams and an engineer task force, besides blankets, tents and other relief items were being flown in to Nepal on Monday.

User

After Nepal quake, India may be next: Experts

According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Saturday's quake, measuring 6 on the Richter scale in Delhi, had a depth of 10 km and its impact lasted up to one minute

 

In the wake of the strong 7.9 magnitude earthquake that killed over a 1,500 people in Nepal and left a swathe of devastation in the northern Himalayas on Saturday, experts said a temblor of equal intensity is "overdue" in northern India."
 
"An earthquake of the same magnitude is overdue. That may happen either today or 50 years from now... in the region of the Kashmir, Himachal, Punjab and Uttrakhand Himalyas. Seismic gaps have been identified in these regions," B.K. Rastogi, the director general of the Ahmedabad-based Institute of Seismological Research, told IANS on the phone.
 
This is because the movement of tectonic plates generates stress over time, and rocks at the surface break in response. When the stress accumulates, every 100 km stretch of the 2,000-km-long Himalyas can be hit by a high-magnitude earthquake.
 
"The accumulation of stress is going on everywhere. But where it will reach the elastic limit, we don't know nor also when. But what we do know is that it is happening everywhere," Rastogi added.
 
"With 20 such locations that are prone to high-intensity earthquakes, it takes 200 years for an earthquake of this magnitude to happen on this belt. In 1833, the same epicentre - 80 km northwest of Kathmandu - an earthquake of 7.5 magnitude had hit the region," he said.
 
According to the India Meteorological Department (IMD), Saturday's quake, measuring 6 on the Richter scale in Delhi, had a depth of 10 km and its impact lasted up to one minute. 
 
The US Geological Survey said the epicentre was in Nepal's Lamjung district some 75 km from Kathmandu. The aftershocks were felt even half-an-hour after the quake and some lasted till evening.
 
Rastogi said that the earthquake uplifted the rocks by four meters, rupturing an area 100 km long and 50 meters wide of the epicentre.
 
Scientist PR Vaidya at IMD here, said Nepal falls on the Alpine-Himalayan belt, one among the three seismic belts on the Earth's surface, which is responsible for 10 percent of the world's earthquakes.
 
The Apline-Himalayn belt, which is prone to high-intensity earthquakes, runs through New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, the Andaman and Nicobar Islands and northeast India, from where it turns to Nepal and then to Jammu and Kashmir, up to Afghanistan and the Mediterranean Sea. It finally ends in Europe.
 
The world's greatest earthquake belt, the circum-Pacific seismic belt, is found along the rim of the Pacific Ocean, where about 80 percent of the world's largest temblors occur.
 
Rastogi said within the 40-km-range of the epicentre, the scale of damage has been very high, with a total collapse of buildings.
 
The aftershocks, he added, would be felt for two days in case of a "strong" earthquake" of about magnitude 8.
 
"Even small buildings that were hit in the first wave may be damaged by the aftershocks if not designed properly. And the aftershocks may continue for one or two months," he said.
 
About 40 million years ago, India was 5,000 km south of where the Himalyas now stand. With the continental shift, India and the Asian continent came closer to form the Himalayas.
 
"And the process of movement continues at about two cm every year. The Indian landmass today is pushing the Asian landmass and that generates stress," Rastogi said.
 
Scientist Vaidya said: "Earthquakes happen because of the theory of plate tectonics, which means with the movement of tactonic plates, stress in generated in the rocks."
 
The quake claimed nearly 40 lives in India, causing widespread destruction in parts of Bihar, Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal.
 
Earthquakes, however don't kill, said Vaidya. "It's the damage caused to the structures around us that cause the loss of life."
 

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)