SEBI wants media ‘self regulation’ while writing on stock market

Currently, SEBI rules require media companies to disclose their interests or shareholding in listed companies while writing on them. Similarly, publicly traded firms are required to disclose details about their relationships with media companies

Chennai: Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) chairman UK Sinha has said the media should exercise more ‘self regulation’ when it comes to writing about the stock market, reports PTI.

The market regulator plans to have interactions with media personnel in the coming months to make them aware about the “dos and don’ts” when reporting on the capital market.

“SEBI will have a series of interactions with media personnel on the dos and don’ts in the industry. They should exchange notes (with SEBI) on what is happening in the industry and how to educate people. There is a need to educate the public,” Mr Sinha told PTI.

Currently, SEBI rules require media companies to disclose their interests or shareholding in listed companies while writing on them. Similarly, publicly traded firms are required to disclose details about their relationships with media companies.

Way back in 2007, then SEBI chairman M Damodaran had mooted the idea of a self regulatory organisation for print and the electronic media, among others.

In August, 2010, SEBI made it mandatory for media groups to disclose details about private treaties for a stake in listed companies in lieu of promoting their brands.

The regulator had also made it compulsory for media houses to disclose in news reports their stakes in companies being written about.

"There are prescribed norms of journalistic conduct that require journalists to disclose any interest that they may have in the company about which they are reporting,” SEBI had said in August 2010.

“... However, there are no equivalent requirements in the case of media companies holding a stake in the company which is being reported or covered,” it had said.

“Therefore, SEBI took up the issue with the Press Council of India, expressing its concerns on the practice of many media groups entering into agreements, such as ‘private treaties’, with companies,” it had said in a statement.

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SEBI committee examining e-IPO proposal

The proposed e-IPO move would enable companies to sell shares electronically. Under such a system, investors would bid for shares online and would not be required to sign any papers physically

Chennai: A committee set up by market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI) to examine initial public offer (IPO)-related issues is looking into a proposal to allow companies to sell shares through electronic Initial Public Offers (e-IPOs), reports PTI.

The proposed move would enable companies to sell shares electronically. Under such a system, investors would bid for shares online and would not be required to sign any papers physically.

“The committee set up by SEBI to undertake various issues relating to IPOs is looking into it (the e-IPO proposal). We are awaiting formal clearance from the ministry of corporate affairs for the e-IPO process,” SEBI chairman UK Sinha told PTI.

Asked about SEBI’s proposal for reducing the number of days in the IPO process, he said, “The current period of 12-plus days and how to reduce it is part of the committee’s mandate.”

Calling for more awareness among the public on financial markets, he said an international conference is proposed to be held in Goa in February as part of investor education initiatives.

A SEBI official said the conference will be co-hosted by SEBI and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

The conference will explore domestic issues related to investor education as well as international issues and global trends, with special focus on Asia and its investor education needs, he said.

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FIIs take Rs2 trillion hit on falling rupee, stock losses

 

The quantum of losses suffered by FIIs was large and the depreciation in their investment value was also much larger than that for the domestic investors, owing to a plunge in the rupee valuation against the US dollar and other foreign currencies

New Delhi: Pitted against the double-whammy of a falling rupee and plunging share prices, foreign investors are estimated to have taken a hit of over Rs2 lakh crore in 2011 on their investments in Indian stock markets, reports PTI.

Once a darling of overseas investors for its impressive returns, the Indian equity market turned into a money-guzzler for institutions from abroad in 2011, and the outlook does not seem bright for the New Year as well.

It is not the amount of the net outflow by FIIs (foreign institutional investors) alone, which makes 2011 a bad year for Indian stock markets.

The quantum of losses suffered by FIIs was also large and the depreciation in their investment value was also much larger than that for the domestic investors, owing to a plunge in the rupee valuation against the US dollar and other foreign currencies.

According to market regulator Securities and Exchange Board of India (SEBI), FIIs purchased stocks worth more than Rs6 lakh crore during 2011, but sold shares worth a higher amount—resulting into a net outflow of over Rs2,700 crore for the year.

In comparison, Indian equities had witnessed a net FII inflow of over Rs1.3 lakh crore in the previous year, 2010.

Also, FIIs took a hit of 36% on their investments during 2011, as measured by the movement in the BSE's Dollex index (which tracks the barometer index Sensex in the US dollar terms for foreign investors).

Taking into account a gross purchase of shares worth Rs6.11 lakh crore by FIIs in 2011, the total hit for them is estimated at over Rs2 lakh crore. They accounted for about 10% of total losses of Rs19.45 lakh crore for the entire stock market.

The capital poured in by the FIIs has often been called ‘hot money’ because of its unpredictability, but these overseas entities have still been among the most important drivers of Indian stock markets.

During 2011, the FIIs were seen shifting their loyalty to the debt market and infused Rs42,067 crore. This helped India get a net FII inflow of Rs39,353 crore for the year, while taking into account both stocks and debt securities.

Fears of a global economic slowdown and domestic troubles with inflation, interest rates, lack of reforms and the falling rupee all collaborated to make the foreign investors cautious in 2011, experts said.

Destimoney Securities’ managing director and CEO Sudip Bandyopadhyay said, “Eurozone worries have pushed the Indian market into risk aversion mode and other emerging countries are performing better than India, so FIIs are staying from our market.”

Ashika Stock Broking research head-equities Paras Bothra said, “This is a natural shift from the FIIs or any other class of investor. With interest rate remaining astronomically high, portfolio allocation to debt market gets raised up in the overall composition of the asset allocation structure.”

Experts also said that outflow was seen in most of the sectors, but interest rate sensitive segments like auto, banking and realty were among the worst hit.

“Almost all the sectors saw pulled out barring FMCG (fast moving consumer goods) and some of the blue-chip stocks. In addition, the rate sensitive stocks like banking, realty and auto were severely hit,” CNI Research head Kishor Ostwal said.

Speaking about the New Year, Geojit Financial Services’ research head Alex Mathew said: “I am not very optimistic for the next year... FIIs will continue to pull out capital at least in the first half of 2012... Besides, any investment will depend on government and RBI policies.”

Angel Broking’s MD Lalit Thakkar said that the FII sell-off could come to an end only after a solution was reached on the Eurozone front and there was some positive news on the domestic economic policy front.

A saving grace during 2011 has been a continued rise in the number of FIIs present in the country. At the end of 2011, there were a total of 1,767 FIIs and 6,278 sub-accounts in the country. The number of FIIs increased by about 50 and that of their sub-accounts by more than 750 during 2011.

The net outflow of Rs2,715 crore ($358 million) by FIIs from the stocks was the second highest withdrawal since 1997. The FIIs had pulled out a record Rs52,987 crore from the equities in 2008, when the US financial crisis had sent tremors around the world affecting Indian market too.

This has taken the overall gross purchases by FIIs so far in the country to close to Rs56 lakh crore. After taking into account gross sales worth Rs50 lakh crore by FIIs so far, they have made a net investment of over Rs5.65 lakh crore ($128 billion) since markets were opened up for them in 1992.

This includes about Rs4.44 lakh crore ($102 billion) in stocks and the rest Rs1.2 lakh crore ($26 billion) in debt securities.

 

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