Economy
SC stays NGT order mandating green clearance for Metro, rail projects
New Delhi: The Supreme Court on Friday stayed a National Green Tribunal (NGT) order mandating environmental clearance for all Metro and other rail projects prior to their launch.
 
A bench of Chief Justice T.S. Thakur and Justice A.M. Khanwilkar stayed the May 31, 2016 order of the NGT after Attorney General Mukul Rohatgi told the court that it is coming in the way of various projects, including Metro, and the East-West and North-South dedicated freight corridors.
 
The apex court order came on a petition by the Dedicated Freight Corridors Corporation of India (DFCCI).  
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Bengaluru wastes nearly 50% of the water it gets from Cauvery
As Karnataka continues its legal battle over the Cauvery, the states capital -- almost entirely dependent on the river -- wastes half the water it receives, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of water-use data.
 
The only Indian city that wastes water at a greater rate is Kolkata. And the situation in Bengaluru will only worsen.
 
Every Bangalorean -- 8.5 million people live in India's third-most populous city -- should get 150 litres of water per day. But what she gets is 65 litres, the equivalent of four flushes of a toilet. Water is supplied, on average, thrice a week.
 
Over the next nine years, the city's water demand is predicted to be three times more than supply.
 
Its population density 13 times higher than Karnataka's average, Bengaluru consumes 50 per cent of Cauvery water reserved for domestic use in Karnataka. As much as 49 per cent of this water supplied is what is called "non-revenue water" or "unaccounted for water" -- i.e., water lost in distribution -- according to the Bengaluru Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB) data.
 
"Inequitable supply to different parts of the city -- ranging from one-third to three times the average per capita daily supply -- makes this worse," Krishna Raj, associate professor at the Institute for Social and Economic Change (ISEC), Bengaluru, and author of a 2013 paper on the city's water supply system, told IndiaSpend.
 
Bengaluru's water loss is the second-highest among Indian metros: Kolkata leads at 50 per cent. The wastage figure for Mumbai is 18 per cent, New Delhi, 26 per cent and Chennai, 20 per cent. Across the world, cities lose only about 15 to 20 per cent of their supply, said the ISEC study, which pegged Bengaluru's losses at 48 per cent three years ago.
 
Former BWSSB chairman, T.M. Vijaybhaskar, admitted to a loss of about 46 per cent water at a conference in February 2016. "Of 1,400 MLD (million litres per day) of water pumped to the city, 600 MLD goes to waste," he said.
 
The ISEC paper attributed the wastage to two types of distributional losses: First, damages and leakages in the water supply system and, second, unauthorised water connections.
 
"Water leakages largely take place at distribution mains, service pipes and stand posts and together account for 88.5 per cent of water spillover, the rest being low leakages at main valve, meter joint stop valve, ferrule, air valve and others," the paper said. "This huge loss is directly attributed to the water seepage at various stages of supply."
 
Of the 270 thousand million cubic ft (TMC) of Cauvery water allotted to Karnataka by the Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal, Raj estimated that, roughly, about 80 per cent is used for agriculture and industry (down from over 90 per cent in 2007). This leaves about 20 per cent for rural and urban domestic use, of which Bengaluru records the highest demand.
 
The city receives about 19 TMC of Cauvery water. Recently, the Karnataka State Urban Development Department provisionally raised supply by an additional 10 TMC to meet the needs of 110 villages added to the metropolitan area in 2007. A formal proposal to raise the city's water supply to 30 TMC from the Cauvery basin has been forwarded to the central government.
 
Sourced from a distance of 100 km, up to a height of 540 m, the BWSSB spends nearly 60 per cent of its budget in pumping water to the Bengaluru metropolitan region. With groundwater reserves overexploited and polluted, and its other two ageing reservoirs -- the 120-year-old Heseraghatta and 83-year-old Thippegondanahalli of Cauvery's Arkavathi tributary -- unreliable, Bengaluru is almost entirely dependent on the disputed river.
 
The large water losses, which ISEC has recorded for the last five years at least, offset any efforts to augment water supply through various stages of Cauvery river water supply projects. Thus, efforts to enhance per capita water availability to 150 litres per capita per day (LPCD) to meet World Health Organisation (WHO) and Central Public Health and Environmental Organisation (CPEEHO) standards remain unfulfilled.
 
"After Stage IV Phase II of the Cauvery Water Supply Scheme (CWSS) was commissioned recently, Bengaluru now receives 1,350 MLD of water daily," said Raj. "For the city's population of 8.5 million (Census 2011), this quantity officially raises per capita water availability to 158.82 litres, which is more than sufficient to meet the WHO and CPEEHO standards."
 
If unaddressed, the situation is only likely to worsen. In nine years, the city's demand (currently 1,575 MLD) is estimated to rise by 71 per cent, while the supply (currently 1,350 MLD) will rise only by a third, thereby tripling the demand-supply gap, according to the ISEC study of water demand and availability.
 
By 2031, Bengaluru's water supply will reach its optimum level (2,070 MLD) and stay there while the city's water demands rise further in the decades thereafter, widening the shortfall progressively, showed BWSSB data.
 
"Whenever the demand for water exceeds supply, urban water utilities quickly design water supply strategies, giving little importance to demand control or management. Failure of water supply authorities to incorporate demand-side factors in their policies leads to 'system-collapse' or 'institutional failure'," the 2013 paper said.
 
"As per the Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal award, Karnataka receives lesser water per sq km -- 1 TMC of water is distributed over 134 sq km here, whereas in Tamil Nadu, it is supplied to 116 sq km," Raj said. "Add to this, there is inefficiency and inequity in Bengaluru's supply which must be addressed."
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 

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COMMENTS

ch prakash

5 months ago

The need of the hour is stopping water distribution losses. How to stop them?. Throughout the Country, the system is completely dependent on petty contractors for execution. The key is Government itself setting up a distribution company fully focussed on monitoring the execution of various water supply and drainage works that are going on. Sell management control stakes in Cos like BHEL, HMT, Air India etc where Government presence is not required and with the proceeds set up Water Supply & Drainage Corporation of India and look after the needs otherwise situation turns worse for urban population.

True stories show how distorted modern values are (The Funny Side)
Proposed Fourth Law of Robotics: All robots must have dog memories implanted in them so if they mutiny we can control them with vacuum cleaners and bacon treats.
 
Essential, right? So how come people aren't working on it?
 
People focus totally on the wrong things these days. Media reports are screaming that idiot celebrity X is feuding with idiot celebrity Y; chocolate is good for you/bad for you; a dangerous lunatic is likely to be elected president of one country or another; and so on, and I say: tell me something NEW.
 
Our values have changed. Here's the sort of typical scenario that would get a modern person excited: 1) Can't find phone, races home from work. 2) Discovers entire street destroyed by alien attack. 3) Finds phone at bottom of briefcase. 4) *screams* THANK YOU GOD.
 
The scary thing is this distorted value system controls our spending. Hipster: You want the equivalent of eight US dollars for this book? This is an outrage. Barista: Here's your latte; that will be $10.75. Hipster: Thanks.
 
The biggest worry for me as a journalist is manufactured outrage. Many of my buddies are furious several times a day about "news reports" on the internet which are entirely untrue, some of which they made up themselves.
 
A few days ago, famous Cuban activist Coco Farinas ended his two-month hunger strike after reading that the European parliament was taking up his campaign. It turned out to be fake news -- but he only found out after dinner.
 
An Australian reader told me about a woman named Sally in Fremantle who recently revealed on the internet that she had been hit with a hefty fine for bad parking when one wheel of her car was just fractionally over the edge of the white line, as she proved with a photo she uploaded. The internet greeted this as an atrocity on a Hitler-invades-Poland scale. But then the traffic officer who wrote the ticket revealed that he'd found her car badly parked across two spaces and ALSO provided photographic proof proving this.
 
Both individuals came across as truthful, but that could only be the case if some incredibly strong mystery people had physically picked up the car and moved it when neither Sally nor the traffic cop were looking.
 
The mystery was solved when a security video revealed she had parked really badly and then some incredibly strong mystery people had physically picked up the car and moved it while neither Sally nor the traffic cop were looking.
 
I like this story because a) it shows that life is weird, and b) goofy folk who do random acts of kindness really exist.
 
I wish I could meet more of them. There was a video on the internet the other day that I think was real. It showed a guy trying to give away cash in the street. Modern trendy hipster people refused to take it, while ordinary humble folk took it gratefully.
 
If you are reading this, cash-dispensing-guy, you can repeat the experiment in my front yard. It will be over in seconds. I have a sack ready. I'll use the money to buy a book. Or a latte.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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