SC sets up three members panel to oversee MCI functioning

The court decided to set-up the committee to oversee the functioning of the MCI including its statutory functions as it sustained the May 15, 2009, Madhya Pradesh High Court decision upholding a 2007 state law providing for common entrance test and fixation of fee in colleges imparting professional courses

 

Taking a dim view of the functioning of the Medical Council of India, the Supreme Court on Monday set-up a three member committee to oversee its functioning including statutory functions and vet all its policy decisions.
 
"The committee will have the authority to oversee all statutory functions under the MCI Act. All policy decisions of the MCI will require approval of the Oversight Committee. The Committee will be free to issue appropriate remedial directions," said a constitution bench of Justice Anil R. Dave, Justice A.K.Sikri, Justice R.K.Agrawal, Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel and Justice R. Banumathi.
 
The three member committee comprising former chief justice of India R. M. Lodha, former comptroller and auditor general Vinod Rai and Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences director Shiv Sarin "will function till the central government puts in place any other appropriate mechanism after due consideration of the Expert Committee Report".
 
Directing the central government to "consider and take further appropriate action in the matter at the earliest", the bench said: "Initially the Committee will function for a period of one year, unless suitable mechanism is brought in place earlier."
 
The court decided to set-up the committee to oversee the functioning of the MCI including its statutory functions as it sustained the May 15, 2009, Madhya Pradesh High Court decision upholding a 2007 state law providing for common entrance test and fixation of fee in colleges imparting professional courses.
 
Pointing to the "urgent need to review the regulatory mechanism for other service oriented professions also", the bench said: "We do hope this issue will receive attention of concerned authorities, including the Law Commission, in due course."
 
Constituting the three member committee, the bench noted the sorry state of affairs pointed out by the group of experts headed by Ranjit Roy Chaudhary in their report submitted on September 25, 2014.
 
The court also noted that even the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Health and Family Welfare which examined the existing "architecture of the regulatory oversight of the medical profession" had observed that the "MCI was repeatedly found short of fulfilling its mandated responsibilities. Qualify of medical education was at its lowest ebb, the right type of health professionals were not able to meet the basic health need of the country".
 
The report of the parliamentary committee submitted to Rajya Sabha and Lok Sabha on March 8, the court noted, had said that the "MCI was not able to spearhead any serious reforms in medical education. The MCI neither represented the professional excellence nor its ethos. Nominees of central government and state governments were also from corporate private hospitals which are highly commercialised.."
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Why antibiotics can also make you more prone to infection!

Antibiotics benefit pathogen growth by disrupting oxygen levels and fibre processing in the gut, the study said

 

Antibiotics are essential for fighting bacterial infection, but, paradoxically, they can also make the body more prone to infection and diarrohea by allowing gut pathogens to “breathe”, says a study.
 
Antibiotics benefit pathogen growth by disrupting oxygen levels and fibre processing in the gut, the study said.
 
The findings, published in the journal Cell Host Microbe, could lead to development of new strategies to prevent the side effects of antibiotic treatment.
 
Exactly how the resident "good" microbes in the gut protect against pathogens, such as Salmonella, and how antibiotic treatments foster growth of disease-causing microbes have been poorly understood.
 
But the new research in a mouse model has identified the chain of events that occur within the gut lumen after antibiotic treatment that allow "bad" bugs to flourish.
 
The process begins with antibiotics depleting "good" bacteria in the gut, including those that breakdown fibre from vegetables to create butyrate, an essential organic acid that cells lining the large intestine need as an energy source to absorb water, said lead researcher Andreas Baumler, professor at University of California Davis Health System in the US.
 
The reduced ability to metabolise fibre prevents these cells from consuming oxygen, increasing oxygen levels in the gut lumen that favour the growth of Salmonella.
 
Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrohea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection, according to the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
 
"Unlike Clostridia and other beneficial microbes in the gut, which grow anaerobically, or in the complete absence of oxygen, Salmonella flourished in the newly created oxygen-rich micro environment after antibiotic treatment," Baumler said. 
 
"In essence, antibiotics enabled pathogens in the gut to breathe," Baumler noted.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 

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`Threats of violence, political pressure among challenges to freedom of press in India'

The World Press Freedom Day celebrates the fundamental principles of press freedom, assess the state of press freedom throughout the world, defends the media from attacks on their independence and pays tribute to journalists who have lost their lives in the line of duty

 

There are several challenges to the freedom of the press in India, including threats of violence from vested interests and pressure from political parties, experts have said, calling for greater involvement of civil society in cases pertaining to journalists.
 
Talking to IANS on the issues concerning the media in India on the eve of World Press Freedom Day on May 3, the experts, including senior journalists, said that mediapersons also need to adapt to the new challenges by being more bold.
 
The World Press Freedom Day celebrates the fundamental principles of press freedom, assess the state of press freedom throughout the world, defends the media from attacks on their independence and pays tribute to journalists who have lost their lives in the line of duty.
 
It is observed on the anniversary of Declaration of Windhoek - a statement of free press principles put together by newspaper journalists in Africa during a Unesco seminar held in the Namibian city in 1991.
 
Sevanti Ninan, Editor, The Hoot, a website which undertakes research pertaining to the media to strengthen its independence, said there has been a decline in press freedom in the last few years.
 
“The greater vulnerability is for journalists in districts and small towns. One reason for this that many of them are now using RTI to investigate local scams and they pose a threat to the powerful in government and in politics,” Ninan told IANS. 
 
She cited instances of death of three journalists covering investigative stories over the last year and said there should be a law guaranteeing press freedom, which is different from free speech.
 
She said committees comprising journalists and civil society members should be kept informed of police action against journalist. 
 
Ninan said the media community in India has been remiss in protecting its counterparts in the regional press. 
 
“There is no pressure group at the national level which maintains pressure on the central and state governments in cases regarding journalists. The Editors Guild and other bodies are not really proactive in this regard. The Press Council publishes reports, but they have no impact,” she said. 
 
Ninan said that it states like Chhattisgarh, where the state is battling Maoists, journalists who try to report on incidents involving the ultras were becoming victims of state oppression. 
 
“There have been four arrests of journalists in Chhattisgarh since july 2015,” Ninan said. 
 
She said the other issue is defamation. “The state government of Tamil Nadu is very active in filing defamation cases against journalists. There have been several already this year,” she said. 
 
Ninan said threats to editorial independence “come from proprietors and advertisers among others” while physical threats come from a variety of sources including the state police.
 
Senior journalist and political commentator S. Nihal Singh said the political atmosphere was not very conducive to freedom of press. 
 
“There are the usual suspects in terms of the bureaucracy being overzealous on occasions. That is one danger and the other is that the whole climate is not really conducive to press freedom. Because, if you narrow down the national ideal to things like 'Bharat Mata Ki Jai' and other things in a similar vein, you are constricting the room for free opinion,” he said.
 
Nihal Singh said "there was greater amount of self-censorship in India today than before the BJP came to power."
 
“In the current instance, it is not so much what you do but what you imply. So in overall terms I think, the outlook is not so bright,” he said.
 
Nihal Singh also said that media was not writing as forthrightly as it normally does or it can do. 
 
“Because if you feel these are vindictive characters in power, you would want to be on the safe side. (There is) that impulse,” he said, adding that journalists themselves have “to pull up their socks because there is no substitute for journalists standing up.” 
 
Senior journalist and political commentator Kuldip Nayar said the terms of employment of journalists have changed and this "does not allow journalists to be free". The "sword of the contract system hangs over the head of journalists," he said.
 
Nayar said there were attempts to politicize the news and evils such as “paid news” had cropped up. 
 
He said journalists should make use of tools of such as RTI and face the challenges boldly.
 
A.S. Narang, who taught political science at IGNOU, said civil society should be more vocal in taking up cases of journalists who face any form of state pressure.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

manoharlalsharma

7 months ago

I realize in MAHARASHTRA whether it is print or visual media is under Threats of violence, political pressure among challenges to freedom of press in India'be we see news in UP/DELHI or BIHAR/MP covers small incidents like pelting stone or argument

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