Regulations
SC scraps pre-medical entrance test
In a major verdict, the Supreme court on Monday scrapped the All India Pre Medical Entrance Test (AIPMT) for the year 2015-16 following the leak of its question paper and circulation of their answer keys through electronic devices at different examination centres in 10 states across the country.
 
The apex court vacation bench headed by Justice R.K. Agrawal while scrapping the examination directed the re-conduct of the same within four weeks.
 
The court also directed all the institutions to extend every cooperation in the re-conduct of the examination for the admission of students in undergraduate medical courses.
 
The court's order came on a PIL and other petitions seeking the re-conduct of the examination in the wake of leak of the question paper, contending that it has compromised the integrity of the entrance test.
 
While directing the re-conduct of the entire test, the court rejected the CBSE contention not to scrap the test as it would effect 6.30 lakh students and also delay the admission process.

User

Make Payments through IMPS
It works 24x7 and costs very little
 
Savers suddenly have a wide range of choice for mobile payments; instead of using physical instruments, like cash, cards or cheques, you use your mobile phone to make the payments. In mobile banking or Internet banking, money can be transferred only when the account number of the payee is known and the account of the payee has to be registered with the payer to initiate a fund transfer. In mobile payments, the account number is masked. The sender is not required to know the bank account number of a receiver for transferring money. This opens up a range of possibilities—from buying tickets to paying auto fare—both of which would not have been feasible had the account number been mandatory for a simple transaction. 
 
One of the least known, but effective, mobile payment systems in India is immediate payment service, or IMPS, launched by National Payment Corporation of India (NPCI) a non-profit company launched by the government. IMPS allows 24x7 instant fund transfer anywhere in India to any bank account-holder whether she uses a low-cost device or a high-end smartphone. For using IMPS, the user only needs to know the mobile number of the payee (registered with her bank), her seven-digit MMID, the amount and sender’s four-digit PIN. MMID (mobile money identifier) is issued to any bank customer when she registers for IMPS.
 
At present, there are 68 banks which offer IMPS facility to customers for money transfer. In addition, prepaid payment service-providers, like Oxigen, GI Tech, Airtel Money, ITZ Cash, UAE Exchange, mRupee and m-Pesa, can allow those without a bank account to send and receive money though mobile phone. For SMS-based IMPS transactions, there is a limit of Rs5,000 per day, per account; the limit for mobile-based apps is Rs50,000. Here is how one can use IMPS.
 
Registration for Remitter (sender): 
Register for mobile banking service at your bank branch.
Get mobile money identifier (MMID) and MPIN from the bank.
Download software (app) for mobile banking (ensure the compatibility of mobile with the application). You can also use the SMS facility.
 
Registration for Beneficiary (receiver):
Link your mobile number to the account in bank.
Get MMID from the bank.
 
For Remitter (to send money):
Login to the application and select the IMPS menu or use the SMS facility in your mobile
Enter beneficiary’s mobile number, beneficiary’s MMID, the amount and your IMPS PIN, which consists one-time PIN and last three digits of your MPIN, to send. 
 
Here is the standard format, if you are using SMS for IMPS…
IMPS
 
For example, send an SMS:  
IMPS 9876543210 1234567 5000 1234789
(Here, 9876543210 is the beneficiary’s mobile number, 1234567 is the MMID of the beneficiary, 5,000 is the amount, 1234 is your one-time PIN and 789 are the last three digits of your MMID.)
 
Remember, the OTPIN you would receive through an SMS will be valid for one hour only.
Await confirmation SMS for the debit from your account and credit in the beneficiary’s account.
Note the transaction reference number for any future query.
 
To Receive Money:
Share your mobile number and MMID.
Ask the remitter to send money using your mobile number and MMID.
• Check the confirmation SMS for credit to your account from the remitter.
• Note the transaction reference number for any future query. 
 
IMPS is a boon for the large number of migrants in every city across India. Without visiting any bank branch, they can remit money to families in their hometown. Since, IMPS can be used 24x7, they do not have to skip their daily wage job. 

User

COMMENTS

Vaibhav Shrivastav

1 year ago

Very good and informative..

ramchandran vishwanathan

1 year ago

what are the charges

REPLY

Rohan

In Reply to ramchandran vishwanathan 1 year ago

Only 5 Banks in India charge for IMPS:
1)ICICI (upto 1lakh-Rs5+SC)(Between 1lakh to 2lakh-Rs 15+SC)

2)SBI (Rs 5)

3)HDFC(upto 1lakh-Rs5+SC)(Between 1lakh to 2lakh-Rs 15+SC)

4)Axis Bank(upto 1lakh-Rs5+SC)(Between 1lakh to 2lakh-Rs 15+SC)

5)Punjab National Bank(Rs 5+SC)

Shashank S

In Reply to ramchandran vishwanathan 1 year ago

For IMPS most banks charge Rs 5 per transaction (5.62 if u include Service tax)

Kedar Jayant Deshpande

1 year ago

Very informative. Thanks !

When Doctors Are Away
Only the human mind matters; the body does not matter at all
 
A Massachusetts General Hospital study revealed that death and disability rates in seriously ill patients in intensive care units came down when nearly 90% of the specialist cardiologists were in college meetings or away from their great responsibility. This fits in with the views of one of their leaders, Dr Harlan Krumholz, lamenting that most cardiac interventions in the United States (emulated zealously in India) are done for money and not for patients’ benefit. A study that showed that between Philadelphia (US) and Ontario (Canada)—with similar demographics—the cardiac intervention rates were 1:10 in favour of the US. Yet, at the end of five years, there were more people alive in Ontario in that cohort than in Philadelphia! Other studies showed that when doctors went on strike, the society’s health improved and mortality and morbidity fell significantly.
 
I have planned a study of per capita mortality in two time slots, 1930-1970 and 1970-2010 in the same hospitals in US, England and India. I am making all-out efforts for this at the moment. My hunch is that there will be a significant worsening of mortality and morbidity rates in the second slot compared to the first, as happened at the Christy’s Hospital in Manchester in one particular disease—chronic myeloid leukaemia—in the previous century. 
 
Human body is a closed system with a powerful healer inside that looks after most—if not all—ills. This healer is called the immune system. The immune system becomes the inner healer where outside interference is limited to “cure rarely, comfort mostly but to console always.” That is precisely why interventions, often, lead to disaster. Even the germ theory and the advent of antibiotics has not been as much of a blessing as it is made out. We have landed ourselves in a catch-22 situation with super bugs ruling the roost in present hospital set-ups forcing us, in desperate situations, to go back to nature, like in the case of faecal transplants, etc. Even in other areas, antibiotics have been a bane. Western science thinks that it is the responsibility of science to meddle even with nature. Primarily, science is meant to try and understand how nature works. If science tries to teach nature a lesson or two, like in genetic engineering, nature will teach us a very nasty lesson sooner than later—if it has not done so already.
 
The king of scientific ideas, quantum physics, has come so close to sanatana dharma that many leading physicists like Max Planck, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Wolfgang Pauli, Paul Durr, Erwin Schrodinger and Niels Bohr have almost become philosophers. Only the human mind matters; the body does not matter at all. Consciousness is fundamental; all else is derived from it. This is elegantly shown by David Wiebers, a noted neuroscientist and teacher in his classic Theory of Reality. If one knows how to keep his/her mind under control, health gets corrected. Yoga, meditation, and pranayama hold the prime place in human healing. Ayurveda is staging a come back. Sadly, real good Ayurveda is no longer extant in India; most colleges teach modern medicine on the sly. 
 
Unfortunately, Western materialistic science is so powerful monetarily that it is able to sell itself in society. The reformers have a twin task on hand—of teaching the new science to future students (it is not too late already) as well as the more arduous task of de-schooling society—that there is no single pill for every ill. The right science of healing has to be encouraged by the powers that be for it to blossom. Even the Western reductionist science has some place in the management of emergencies and corrective surgery. Let us club that with the best in Ayurveda and other complementary systems for the good of mankind.
 
(Professor Dr BM Hegde, a Padma Bhushan awardee in 2010, is an MD, PhD, FRCP (London, Edinburgh, Glasgow & Dublin), FACC and FAMS.)

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COMMENTS

Suresh

1 year ago

I have been reading Dr Hegde's articles for years and am a big fan. But of late I have noticed that most of articles, like today's post, are repetitions of his previous articles. He has not said anything new in today's post which he had not said earlier!

I hope Dr Hegde will resist the pressure of publishing for the sake of posting / meeting deadlines and enlighten us with his medical wisdom in newer areas!

REPLY

Pradeep Kumar

In Reply to Suresh 1 year ago

New readers are always coming in, like me. For me he is still fresh!
And as a insturctor in professional training, I am promoting ML as much as I can, as it is singularly the only money/life magazine one can place once trust on, and so, invest one's greatest resource, one's time.

SuchindranathAiyerS

1 year ago

If the cardiac surgeon had been away when my Dad was rushed to the Apollo Sagar Hospital in Bangalore, he would not have been alive. But he would certainly have escaped the eight weeks of torture of having to live against his will because of a pace maker implant that kept him alive until his kidneys packed up from the medication administered for secondary infections picked up the ICU. He was over 90 at the time, and my Doctor relatives (from the US) say that it is absurd, even by US "under insurance" standards to implant a pace maker at that age.

Vishal Modi

1 year ago

Thank you for good article, Professor Hegde.

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