Citizens' Issues
SC asks Mysuru lab to test more samples of Maggi noodles
New Delhi : The Supreme Court on Wednesday asked Mysuru-based CFTRI lab to get more samples of Maggi to test the lead and Mono Sodium Glucomate (MSG) contents in its taste makers.
 
The apex court bench of Justice Dipak Misra and Justice N.V. Ramana also asked the Central Food Technological Research Institute (CFTRI) to tell if the lead content found in its tests of Maggi carried out in October, in pursuance to the order of NCDRC, was within the limit prescribed under the food safety law and rules framed under it.
 
Giving the lab two months time to carry out the tests and submit its report, the court said if the lab needed more samples, it should ask for them.
 
The next hearing of the matter is on April 5.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

User

COMMENTS

Subramani P K

11 months ago

All junk food of any make should be banned as all of them are having some ingredient or other which is harmful. Besides, the chemicals used to add taste, colour & preservative for long shelf life etc are another set of injurious chemicals and should also be banned. When plenty of fresh eatables are available why go in for these good for nothing products & spoil health by spending money on them. Consumers should be aware of the after effects of these food items in the market. Govt. should also ban the advt. of these products in media.

Airtel sells Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone operations to Orange
New Delhi : Bharti Airtel has sold its operations in Burkina Faso and Sierra Leone to French telecom giant Orange, the firm announced in a statement here on Wednesday.
 
"Orange will acquire 100 percent of the two companies' share capital. The consolidated revenue of the two companies is around 275 million euros. These acquisitions will be implemented in partnership with Orange's subsidiaries in the CA'te d'Ivoire and Senegal," the statement said.
 
The completion of these transactions remains subject to approval by the competent authorities.
 
Lazard and Société Générale were advisors to Orange for this transaction. Airtel was advised by Arma Partners LLP.
 
Through this deal, Orange will reinforce its presence in Africa with two additional countries, adding almost 5.5 million customers to its mobile customer base.
 
The statement said this agreement is further to the initial contract signed between Airtel and Orange in July 2015 regarding the potential acquisition of Airtel's operations in Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone, Chad and Congo Brazzaville.
 
The agreements regarding potential transactions in the remaining two countries have lapsed.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

User

Posting inspirational posts: Are you 'dumb' or a change agent?
New Delhi : This weekend when you are relatively free from life's mundane duties, ask yourself this: Are you the one who loves to post motivational posts taken from New Age gurus to the ancient scriptures on Facebook and Twitter? Did it ever occur to you that posting such profound thoughts may mean that you yourself need to fix your otherwise stressed life? Or are you a genuine change agent seeking to transform people's lives for the better?
 
Although some of the nation's leading behavioural experts slightly differ on this, one thing is clear: For some people, in their quest for bringing clarity and optimism in their own lives, they may be sharing "profound" thoughts with others on various social media platforms.
 
According to Dr. Samir Parikh, director (mental health and behavioral sciences) at Fortis Hospitals in the capital, people typically share posts based on their likes and personalities.
 
"This, however, cannot be generally applied to all the people. The fact is that people post things based on their personalities, their social groups, their interests and likes and dislikes so any more meaning to a post should be best avoided," Parikh told IANS.
 
However, Piya Mukherjee, director at VES Leadership Academy and Research Centre (VESLARC) in Mumbai, such people may or may not have driven by unhappiness in their own lives but they have walked the path of pain and developed a keen sense of compassion for their wider circle of friends on social media.
 
"Apart from the masses, there is another smaller group of people who share such posts - the catalysts or the change agents who genuinely see such posts as capable of inspiring others towards transformation," noted Mukherjee, also a corporate coach.
 
Such people are usually healers, teachers and counsellors by nature, irrespective of the official designation of the work they do. "Their role is to bring in some mind-food into the lives of their friends and they do this with a genuine intention," Mukherjee told IANS.
 
A study last December created quite a stir as it claimed that people who post inspirational and motivational quotes on various social media like Facebook and Twitter are actually "dumb" and "have lower levels of intelligence".
 
In the study titled "On the reception and detection of pseudo-profound bulls***t" that took examples of some of the inspirational quotes from New Age guru Deepak Chopra, psychologists from the University of Waterloo in Canada examined whether some people are more receptive to some silly inspirational statements than others.
 
The findings that appeared in the journal Judgment and Decision Making showed that there is a definite link between low intelligence and being impressed by what looks like "profound statements".
 
"I do not agree with these findings. Posts on inspiration may be a reflection of a person's mindset, temperament, insight or the situation that the person may be in. A person may choose to just share posts with his friends because it inspires him personally or provides him with strength," elaborated Dr. Sameer Malhotra (director, mental health and behavioural sciences) at Max Hospitals.
 
"It is not merely about intelligence but also about suggestibility, personality and support systems around you that shape your attitudes, belief and thinking patterns," Parikh added.
 
Dr. Jyoti Kapoor Madan, senior consultant (psychiatry) at Gurgaon's Paras Hospital, felt that people identify with thoughts and feelings which are prominent in their own mind.
 
"Therefore, we are often interested in reading and searching for content which is associated with our own dilemmas and conflicts. These feelings, thoughts and artistic interpretations are then further shared on social media," Madan told IANS.
 
There is, however, a fine line between "pseudo-profound" and otherwise pure inspirational stuff.
 
"Motivational and inspirational quotes will interest individuals who themselves seek motivation or are seeking to get out of their own sense of helplessness or hopelessness. They may be lonely but are definitely looking to make it better, not worse," Madan explained.
 
According to Mukherjee, when one is experiencing pain and decides to lend a helping hand to another, two things happen - there is an immediate sense of empathy and inter-connectedness with others who may be suffering which, in turn, leads to a better perspective on one's own unhappiness.
 
"Second, the act of helping others allows the person to come out of self-pity and hopelessness and feel that one is doing something useful. Whether or not the act is actually useful is secondary - the perception it creates in the doer's mind is significant," she emphasised.
 
Do such posts on the social media constitute a cry for help?
 
"It would take a perceptive mind to 'join the dots' and realise that the person posting inspiring material is actually going through an acute case of the blues. Hence, a reader can view such received posts at two levels - that of face-value inspiration and of a deeper level query about the person who has posted it," Mukherjee pointed out.
 
In the meantime, keep feeding friends with some real stuff on the social media that may change their lives for good - and yours too!
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.
 

 

User

COMMENTS

MG Warrier

11 months ago

Interesting ‘analysis’. I had a second look at myself and my ‘mailing’/commenting activities after reading this. Let me share the findings:
a) Recently, I am trying to read/listen more of positive writings/talks.
b) (a), it seems, has started influencing my own views.
c) There are broadly two kinds of audience. One, who would like a positive approach to life and problems and two, those who are possessive about their security and wealth, but won’t mind others being a little unhappy.
d) Many who are sharing negative thoughts would have forgotten what they shared and may be enjoying a movie or TV serial when you are still remaining unhappy after reading their post!
e) Believe me, many who forward mails would not have themselves read them.

vswami

11 months ago

add:

BY AND LARGE, 'INSPIRING', 'MOTIVATING',so on, basically implying feedback, howsoever obligingly 'well intended' that be, are all inherently an exercise in futility, for obvious reasons.

May be, there could be exceptions; to know, read the xtract:

"With this ubiquity comes versatility. No longer is the impact of social media confined to our personal lives. Increasingly, it offers opportunities—indeed, even obligations—in the professional arena as well. This is as true for lawyers as it is for any class of professionals. As attorneys, it is critical that we recognize that the most effective—not to mention cost-effective—way to serve our clients may entail the use of social media. This is particularly true for in-house lawyers. A critical component of the in-house role often involves informal discovery—the gathering of relevant facts and information outside of formal, court-supervised channels. Not only does social media afford access to such material, that access is often immediate, generally inexpensive and potentially of incredible value."

Read more: http://www.corpcounsel.com/…/Social-Media-Is-a-Powerful-Too…

vswami

11 months ago

For a Better INisght >

http://link.corpcounsel.com/click/590614...

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)