Nation
SC asks Karnataka to release 12,000 cusecs per day to TN
The Supreme Court on Monday directed the Karnataka government to release 12,000 cusecs of Cauvery river water to Tamil Nadu everyday till September 20, modifying its earlier order of 15,000 cusecs water.
 
The apex court bench of Justice Dipak Misra and Justice Uday Umesh Lalit gave the direction while modifying its September 5 order by which it had asked Karnataka to release 15,000 cusecs of water for the next ten days. 
 
The court rejected Karnataka's plea to keep the September 5 order in abeyance.
 
Taking exception to Karnataka, citing law and order situation as a ground for keeping suspension of the September 5 order, the court said it was the obligation of Karnataka government and people to ensure compliance of the top court's order.
 
The court also asked the Karnataka and Tamil Nadu governments to ensure that observance of law and order situation by people in both states.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

SRINIVAS SHENOY

1 year ago

What do you think?... Write your comments. Water should be available to all Indians. Like our armed forces, we should set aside our petty thoughts like regionalism etc. so that our country progresses and also in the interest of unity of all our states in the Union.

Cabinet nod to setting up Higher Education Financing Agency
To give a major push for creation of high quality infrastructure in premier educational institutions, the Union Cabinet on Monday approved the establishment of a Higher Education Financing Agency (HEFA).
 
"The HEFA would be jointly promoted by the identified promoter and the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD) with an authorised capital of Rs 2,000 crore. The Government equity would be Rs 1,000 crore," an official statement said, after the meeting of the union Cabinet, chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
 
The HEFA would be formed as a SPV within a PSU Bank or Government-owned-NBFC (Promoter).
 
"It would leverage the equity to raise up to Rs 20,000 crore for funding projects for infrastructure and development of world class Labs in IITs/IIMs/NITs and such other institutions," the statement added.
 
The HEFA would also mobilise CSR funds from PSUs or corporates, which would in turn be released for promoting research and innovation in these institutions on grant basis.
 
The HEFA would finance the civil and lab infrastructure projects through a 10-year loan. The principal portion of the loan will be repaid through the 'internal accruals' (earned through the fee receipts, research earnings etc) of the institutions. The government would service the interest portion through the regular Plan assistance.
 
All the centrally funded higher educational institutions would be eligible for joining as members of the HEFA.
 
For joining as members, the institution should agree to escrow a specific amount from their internal accruals to HEFA for a period of 10 years. 
 
This secured future flows would be securitised by the HEFA for mobilising the funds from the market. Each member institution would be eligible for a credit limit as decided by HEFA based on the amount agreed to be escrowed from the internal accruals, the statement said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Behind Karnataka's anger: Rainfall deficits in 90% of state
Karnataka's angst and anger over a Supreme Court (SC) order to release water of the Cauvery river to neighbour Tamil Nadu is rooted in the failure of the monsoon in the state, a hidden variation of India's statistically normal monsoon.
 
Reservoirs in the Cauvery catchment are half as full as they should be, 42 per cent of minor irrigation tanks are dry statewide and 90 per cent of Karnataka's talukas -- subdivisions of districts -- recorded deficit rainfall in August. The water in Karnataka's reservoirs must now be shared between farmers in Karnataka and Tamil Nadu and meet Karnataka's own drinking water needs.
 
Overall, the state was 16 per cent short of normal rainfall between June 1, 2016, and September 5, 2016, according to data from the Karnataka State Natural Disaster Monitoring Centre (KSNDMC).
 
The Meteorological Department classifies this as a "normal" deficit, but rainfall was intermittent and uncertain through the monsoons.
 
After two consecutive droughts, India received normal rainfall -- 2 per cent less than the 100-year average -- by the end of August 2016, but within that normality, more than a third of the country is short of rain, according to India Meteorological Department (IMD) data.
 
Protests erupted in parts of Mysore-Mandya region on September 6 following the SC order and the government's decision to release water to Tamil Nadu. The government has sought a modification of the order.
 
In August, Karnataka's four zones -- south and north interior, the southern Malnad region and the coast -- recorded a 39 per cent deficit in rainfall.
 
The Malnad region, which is critical for the Cauvery's catchment area, received 977 mm in August, against the normal 1,369 mm, a 29 per cent deficit.
 
The situation worsened over the monsoon: 101 of 176 talukas in Karnataka recorded deficit rainfall (-20 to -59 per cent), while 55 talukas recorded scanty rainfall (-60 to -99 per cent) in August 2016.
 
The August rains are critical to the sowing of important crops, such as paddy, ragi, maize and sugarcane. With no more than four weeks left for the end of southwest monsoon, farmers are struggling.
 
Water levels of reservoirs in the Cauvery catchment area, including the Krishna Raja Sagara (KRS) dam in Mandya district, Kabini in Mysore, Harangi in Kodagu and Hemavathi in Hassan were less than normal (based on a 15-year average) and less than the levels in 2015, according to KSNDMC data on September 3.
 
Of 3,598 minor irrigation tanks in the state, 42 per cent are dry and no more than 12 per cent of tanks are more than half full, according to KSNDMC data.
 
The water level at KRS on September 3 was 17.96 tmcft (thousand million cubic feet), against its capacity of 49.45 tmcft, lower than last year's level over the same period (25.30 tmcft). KRS is normally full by this time.
 
The SC's order to release 15,000 cusecs to Tamil Nadu over 10 days would mean the state has to release 13.6 tmcft of water, 24 per cent of the water now available in the Cauvery basin reservoirs.
 
The situation in nine other reservoirs statewide was no better, except for Krishna Basin reservoir's Almatti dam, in northern Karnataka, which is full; Ghataprabha dam, which is at 87 per cent of its capacity; and Narayanapuram dam which is at 96 per cent of its capacity.
 
This could worsen Karnataka's drinking water situation in the coming days. Farmers' representatives argued that their livelihoods are at stake if Karnataka releases more water.
 
"We (farmers) have reduced sugarcane cultivation in 70 per cent of the area as it is water-intensive and have opted for paddy cultivation," Karnataka Rajya Raitha Sangha (Karnataka State Farmers' Association) leader and member of legislative assembly K.S. Puttannaiah told 101reporters.com. "If the government cannot release water even for this, what will the farmers of this region do for a living?"
 
For decades, the two state governments have been fighting for water based on the rains that are unpredictable. They should find a permanent solution to the problem and consult farmer leaders before taking any decision.
 
In Mandya, where protests against the SC order are intense, sowing has been less than 25 per cent of normal as on August 22, 2016, according to Karnataka Agriculture Department data.
 
"With deficit rainfall across the state in August, there will be a reduction in proportionate yield and overall production," said H. Shivanna, Vice Chancellor, University of Agricultural Sciences, Bengaluru. "In the Cauvery basin, they are transplanting paddy (into fields) now, as it requires lesser water than sugarcane. Sowing is already delayed, and if it does not rain for another 10 days, farmers in the state will be severely hit."
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

PPM

1 year ago

Karnataka has built so many small check dams and increased the area under cultivation by multifold, and claiming thee is not enough water for them now. TN is not begging water from Karnataka and is asking only the legal rights. Why karnataka is fighting with Maharastra for water as Maharastra also received less rain. The people of Karnataka feels that Cauvery is the property of karnataka and others are after their property. Can karnataka keep the Cauvery within Karnataka, not a single drop to be sent into TN as TN can not be their drainage during flood.

Bhuvaneswaran K

1 year ago

When Karnataka itself is in difficult situation, what will happen to TN, which is dependent on Cauvery water. Both the states should've worked on an alternative long back.

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