Nation
Salman Khan acquitted in poaching cases
The Rajasthan High Court on Monday acquitted Bollywood actor Salman Khan in the 18-year-old blackbuck and chinkara poaching cases.
 
Salman had appealed before the Jodhpur bench of the high court challenging a lower court verdict handing him a one and five-years term in the two separate cases of poaching. 
 
The hearing was completed in the last week of May and the order reserved by the high court.
 
"He has been acquitted in both the cases by the high court," Salman's counsel Hastimal Saraswat said.
 
Khan was accused of killing a blackbuck and chinkara in two separate incidents.
 
One of the animals was killed at Bhawad on the outskirts of Jodhpur on September 26, 1998, and the other at Ghoda Farms on September 28, 1998.
 
Shooting for the film "Hum Saath Sath Hain" was on at the time.
 
Salman had earlier been lodged in Jodhpur jail in the cases.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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COMMENTS

anil r vanjari

4 months ago

Yeh to honaa hi thaa !! Whether it is animals or human beings, their life is of no value against the action of celebrities, especially those who attend the PM's oath-taking ceremony in a front row.

Satellites provide pointers, but no signs of aircraft yet
An Indian Air Force (IAF) aircraft which disappeared on Friday with 29 people on board remained missing on Sunday despite an intensive search and rescue operation, codenamed 'Operation Talash", and some pointers were provided by indigenous satellites.
 
A senior defence ministry official said indigenous satellites have provided some pointers and ships are searching the indicated area, but nothing has been spotted. 
 
The navy has pressed a flotilla of vessels including a submarine to locate the missing AN-32 which went off the radar two days ago over the Bay of Bengal just half hour after taking off from Chennai on its journey to Port Blairr.
 
There has been no trace of the plane or debris. There are also no signals from the transporter, officials said.
 
According to Indian Coast Guard, an international safety network was activated as part of the search and rescue procedures for alerting the merchant ships passing through the region.
 
The Coast Guard said ships like MV Harsh Vardhana enroute from Port Blair to Chennai, MV Sebat and MV Delice were directed to keep a sharp look out for survivors or debris.
 
An experienced pilot of the Indian defence forces told IANS: "Normally it would take a week for the debris to float in such cases. But search and rescue operations have to be carried out."
 
According to him, if the plane broke into several parts, then there may be a possibility of some debris floating.
 
But if it falls into the sea without breaking, then it may take nearly a week for some items to come to the surface from the sea depth.
 
"As per our calculations the sea depth in the area of search is around 3,500 metres," T.M. Balakrishnan Nair, Head, Information Services Group, Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS), told IANS over phone from Hyderabad.
 
He said the organisation was running models estimating the distance to where the plane debris would have been carried by the sea current.
 
"In the Bay of Bengal there are several whirlpools that may have dragged down the debris," he added.
 
Eastern Naval Command chief Vice Admiral H.C.S. Bisht said that a large number of ships, helicopters and aircraft are contributing to the search.
 
"We are also seeking ISRO's help to get satellite imagery of that area so that we have at least some information... Parallelly we are also reaching out to families," he said.
 
Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, after reviewing the search and rescue operations on Saturday, had asked the commanding officers to keep in touch with families of those on board the missing aircraft.
 
Bisht said the search has been made difficult by the monsoon weather conditions over the sea.
 
"The only challenge we are facing is of monsoon condition, rough seas; another challenge is the depth which is around 3,500 meters and at some points even more than that," he said.
 
The cloud base is low and it is raining continuously in the area, he said.
 
"We are continuously searching the area. As of now we have 12 ships. We will be increasing the assets. We are also doing regular aerial surveillance. The aim is to harness as many resources as possible."
 
The missing aircraft, an upgraded AN-32 belonging to 33 Squadron, took off from Tambaram Air Force Station in Chennai at 8.30 a.m. and was expected to land at Port Blair in the Andaman and Nicobar Islands at 11.30 a.m.
 
The recorded transcript of Chennai air traffic radar showed the last pickup of the aircraft was 151 nautical miles east of Chennai when it was observed to have carried out a left turn with rapid loss of height from 23,000 feet.
 
The AN-32 is a twin engine turboprop, medium tactical transport aircraft of Russian origin. It can carry a maximum load of around 6.7 tonnes or 39 paratroopers. Its maximum cruise speed is 530 kmph.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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What India Should Do Urgently for Public Health
“Healthy citizens are the greatest asset any country can have.” — Winston S Churchill
 
Public health is the health of the public—the common man/woman on the street. Medical education, the governments in all countries and the powers that be are all after sickness-care and the vaccine industry. In essence, a doctor should be trained for keeping the public healthy. What are the basic tools of keeping people healthy? The essence of good health is a strong immune system—our inner healer and protector of our health. Indians used to believe that the immune system is needed to protect us only against germ invasion and not as a guard against chronic, lifestyle diseases. I used to believe, and have a hypothesis, that the immune system guards against almost all diseases—from common cold to cancer.
 
This was my hunch; but a new study gives credence to that view—that a sturdy immune system could protect us from heart attacks, despite conventional risk factors like high blood pressure which, incidentally, has been proven to be of not much use in predicting a heart attack. After studying a group of patients with high blood pressure, researchers found those with higher levels of certain antibodies had a lower risk of heart attack—regardless of other risk factors. They suggest that a blood test to measure antibody levels could help assess a person’s risk of heart attack. The study found higher blood levels of an antibody called immunoglobulin (IgG) were linked to lower risk of heart attack in a group of people with high blood pressure. This study was from Imperial College (London) and is published in the journal Ebiomedicine
 
Lead author Dr Ramzi Khamis, a consultant cardiologist and clinical research fellow at Imperial College, was of the opinion: “Linking a stronger, more robust immune system to protection from heart attacks is a really exciting finding. As well as improving the way we tell who is at the highest risk of a heart attack so that we can give them appropriate treatments, we now have a new avenue to follow in future work.”
 
While this gives us better tools to build our immune system as the foundation of public health against all ills, it reaffirms the Ayurvedic faith in the inner healer to preserve health, right from infancy. On a given day in this world, there might be a few million people sick, while the vast majority of the six-odd billion are healthy. My hypothesis helps the healthy to remain so thereby reducing the rising costs of disease-care in our present medical-care claptrap, most of which is driven by human greed to make money out of fellow human misery, what I call unethical commerce!
 
Having defined the problem, we have to explore how we can maintain a good immune system living in an unhealthy atmosphere obtaining today in this world driven by industrialisation and chemical poisoning of even our crops from seeds to manure! Indian wisdom had it that boosting the immune system is a guard against almost all ills. That is why the elaborate panchakarma procedures were built into its therapeutic regime. That is for the management of an individual; but the society, as a whole, needs the following for the rich and the poor alike. That said, I must hasten to add that a healthy mind is a good immune booster and a strong insurance against illnesses. Frustration, depression, anger, pride, jealousy and super ego are powerful immune depressors. 
 
Public health can be vastly improved by providing clean drinking water for all; (the bottled reverse-osmosis water could be dangerous as it takes away minerals that might be there in the water and also makes the water marginally acidic in pH); three square meals a day for the lowest of the low—uncontaminated by human and/or animal excreta; roof over one’s head for the poor; a toilet for every house; and proper sewage system for all places.
 
“We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane.” — Kurt Vonnegut

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COMMENTS

Vikas Singh Gusain

4 months ago

Good Information, https://www.policybazaar.com

Anand Vaidya

4 months ago

The gov must ban or tax heavily (200%?) cola/sugary drinks, junk food - both Indian (sweets, fried) as well as imported/western (pizza, burger etc).
Kids must be taught good food and hygiene habits instead of drilling the achievements of Akbar or how great the Mughals were...
Employers can be encouraged (tax breaks?) to hold screening camps, provide sports/gym facilities
Promote Yoga, swimming etc. by providing points which can be used as marks in academics

Mahesh S Bhatt

4 months ago

Health is the first Wealthy Value.Your Body is Temple & Yoga is Light in thy Temple.Please donot abuse pollute with smoke/fermented alcohols/drugs & unhealthy food.Use healthy detox techniques like reading books/movies/games/prayers/good friends & boy or girl ,young or old,live & love animals & strangers too.Stay simple. View Winning Attitudes for Altitudes at www.youtube.com. Om Shanti Mahesh

D S Ranga Rao

5 months ago

''Public health can be vastly improved by providing clean drinking water for all; (the bottled reverse-osmosis water could be dangerous as it takes away minerals that might be there in the water and also makes the water marginally acidic in pH); three square meals a day for the lowest of the low—uncontaminated by human and/or animal excreta; roof over one’s head for the poor; a toilet for every house; and proper sewage system for all places.'' None of them is achievable without corruption and mis-governance being rooted out root and branch. Take the case of drinking water. Whereas the government is duty bound to provide safe and clean drinking water to one all, it has miserably failed to do so for the last 68 years of Independence, having given in to all sorts of political pulls and pressures in encouraging bottled-water plants, thus making the drinking water a commercial commodity much to the benefit of their political cronies. Next, the primary health care: Nowhere in sight. If it were strong and good enough, why lakhs of women and children die every year during pregnancy, child birth, or before the age of 5 of a child? What about malnutrition of children, rampant in tribal areas? So, unless these basic issues are addressed adequately, India cannot become a super power simply by blowing its trumpets in the world fora.

AMAN HANDA

5 months ago

SUPER

AMAN HANDA

5 months ago

SUPER

AMAN HANDA

5 months ago

AN EXTREME POSITIVITY TOWARD'S HUMANITY

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