RTI Judgement Series
RTI Judgement Series: Persistence brings forward serious lapse in records for new-born babies in Delhi hospital

The Commission congratulated the applicant for bringing to light a serious lapse in a Delhi hospital, which could be misused for trafficking of new-born babies. This is the 81st in a series of important judgements given by former Central Information Commissioner Shailesh Gandhi that can be used or quoted in an RTI application

The Central Information Commission (CIC), while allowing a complaint, congratulated the applicant for brining to light a serious lapse in records of new-born babies left by parents or guardians at Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Hospital in Delhi which could be misused to trafficking in new born babies.

 

While giving this judgement on 25 September 2009, Shailesh Gandhi, the then Central Information Commissioner said, “...it is apparent that there has been no system in place (at the hospital) to ensure that proper documentation is available from the place where the babies are received. Because of the persistence of the RTI applicant the hospital has now obtained these and given them to the appellant. The hospital appears to recognize that there was a serious lapse in its systems.”

 

New Delhi resident Raajmangal Prasad, on 21 February 2009, sought information under the Right to Information (RTI) Act from the Public Information Officer (PIO) of Dr Babasaheb Ambedkar Hospital in Delhi. Here is the information he sought and the reply provided by the PIO...

 

1. How many out of five new-born babies have been left by parents/guardians and how many brought by police?     

PIO's Reply: Out of five new-born babies one has been left by parents/ guardians and four brought by police.

 

2. How many were handed over to the Delhi Council for Child Welfare and how many to the police? Give documentary evidence.        

PIO's Reply: Two children were sent Delhi Council for Child Welfare and three children were handed over to the police authorities.

 

3. Mention the sex (male/female) of the children.  

PIO's Reply: Out of five, two were male and three were female.

 

Claiming that the PIO supplied information without any documentary evidence, Prasad filed his first appeal. The order of First Appellate Authority was not enclosed.

 

Prasad then approached the Commission with his second appeal.

 

During the hearing, Mr Gandhi, the then CIC, noted that the appellant (Prasad) has sought details about new born babies left by parents/guardians and handed over to the Police or to the Delhi Council for Child Welfare. However, the hospital did not have the documents evidencing where the children were sent, he noted.

 

Subsequently after the filing of the first appeal by the appellant, the hospital started searching papers and was able to locate the papers for three children, the CIC said.

 

“Due to the persistence of Prasad, the hospital obtained these (papers) and gave it to the appellant. The hospital appears to recognize that there was a serious lapse in its systems.  The Commission congratulates the applicant for brining to light a serious lapse which could be misused to trafficking in new born babies,” Mr Gandhi said while allowing the appeal.

 

CENTRAL INFORMATION COMMISSION

 

Decision No. CIC/SG/A/2009/001900/4934

http://www.rti.india.gov.in/cic_decisions/SG-25092009-06.pdf

Appeal No. CIC/SG/A/2009/001900

 

Appellant                                            : Raajmangal Prasad

                                                                   Delhi-110092

 

Respondent                                       : Dr Amareshwar Narayan

                                                                  Public Information Officer

                                                                 Dr. Baba Saheb Ambedkar Hospital,                                                                                               Sector-VI, Rohini,

                                                                Delhi-110085

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Domestic air traffic up by 1.59% in March

However, the overall passengers carried by domestic airlines during the first quarter of the calendar year 2013 was 152.12 lakh, a decline of 2.78% from the corresponding period of last year

Domestic air passenger traffic increased marginally by 1.59% in March at 51.89 lakh from 51.08 lakh during the corresponding month of last year, the civil aviation ministry said Thursday.

 

On a month-on-month basis the traffic grew by 6.07%, as the domestic airlines carried 51.89 lakh passengers in the month under review from 48.92 lakh passengers ferried in February, 2013.

 

However, the overall passengers carried by domestic airlines during the first quarter of the calendar year (Jan-Mar, 2013) was 152.12 lakh, a decline of 2.78% from the corresponding period of last year, when the passenger carrier's ferried 156.47 lakh travellers.

 

On a standalone basis, IndiGo had the largest market share of 27.4%, followed by SpiceJet (20.4%), Air India's domestic operations (20.2%), Jet Airways (17.7%), Go Air (8.1%) and JetLite (6.1%).

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Copper prices expected to gravitate towards $6,000 per tonne, says Credit Suisse

Copper prices, unlike its peers, have not grabbed much attention even though its price crash has been equally dramatic. Credit Suisse expects that supply will be the key differentiator as prices continue its downfall

Commodity prices have been in a correction mode in the past few weeks, with gold and crude oil already in a downward movement. But one metal that has not caught the eyes of investors is copper. The stockpile of copper recently breached a 10-year high on the London Metals Exchange (LME); the price has been trending down, below $7000 per tonne. The report sounds an even more cautious tone when it states: “Risks are also skewed towards the possibility of a deeper correction or undershoot, borne out by combined effects of structurally moderated demand growth and a long overdue delivery of abundant supply expansions for the first time in several years.”
 

Credit Suisse expects copper prices to trade towards $6,000 per tonne. Their report titled ‘Copper: Another One Bites the Dust’ states: “However, this time we feel that the move lower is likely to be structural in nature. In essence, after trading closer to the top of the $6,000 to $9,000 range in place since 2006, we now expect prices to gravitate towards the bottom end of that band.”
 

The reason for the pessimistic forecast is two-fold; firstly, supply has increased which resulted in record stockpiles. Secondly, a ‘structural downshift’ from China has resulted in weak demand. The confluence of the two has resulted in a crash in copper prices. Credit Suisse mentions that China demand has weakened so much that its growth rate is likely to settle at around single digits range of 7%-8%.

Additionally, the global investment bank mentions that any upward movement in price, perhaps due to European recovery, would be temporary and a good opportunity for short-term traders. The report states: “European road to recovery will be long and bumpy, is likely to see many industrial commodity prices move to a lower equilibrium, with any near-term bounce providing a new selling opportunity.”
 

More important than demand is the question of supply that has led to record stockpiles. The report states: “Copper’s price fortunes hinge more importantly on prospects for supply growth, rather than demand”. Steady expansion and investments in efficiency meant that supply is more ready than ever, with fewer levels of mine disruptions. The report states: “If, as seems quite plausible, miners suffer a lower level of disruptions and delays than in recent years, and expansion targets are more closely met, supply surpluses will inevitably rise.” Chile is one of the world’s largest producers of copper, yet the prevailing sentiment there is bearish as well.

Copper is an important commodity for several reasons. Firstly, it is a key material for electrifying homes, so it can be used as a barometer for gauging economic performance. Second, much of the world’s copper supply is consumed by China. Any small blip on the demand side from China is bound to affect copper. While the price has fallen to this level several times in the past couple of years, on each occasion the dip proved relatively temporary. However, this time around, we feel that the move lower is likely to be structural in nature, the report said.

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