Citizens' Issues
Report criticizes EPA oversight of injection wells

The US Government Accountability Office says environmental regulators are failing to adequately enforce rules for wells used to dispose of toxic waste from drilling

 

Federal environment officials have failed to adequately oversee hundreds of thousands of wells used to inject toxic oil and gas drilling waste deep underground, according to a new congressional report.


The report, released Monday by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, is critical of the Environmental Protection Agency's inconsistent handling of safety inspections, poor record keeping, and failure to adjust its guidelines to adapt to new risks brought by the recent boom in domestic drilling, including the understanding that injection wells are causing earthquakes.


The EPA generally agreed with the GAO's findings and characterization of the challenges the agency is currently facing.


Concerns have mounted recently about potential water contamination from injections wells. California officials have ordered an emergency shut-down of 11 oil and gas waste injection sites and a review of more than 100 others, out of fears that fracking fluids and other toxic waste are reaching drinking water aquifers there. Earthquakes from Ohio to Oklahoma to Texas have also been blamed on injection wells governed by the EPA's program.


The GAO's findings echo those in a 2012 ProPublica investigation which found that the nation's injection wells were often poorly regulated and experienced high rates of failure, likely leading to pollution of underground water supplies. ProPublica's investigation found that the EPA did not know exactly how many wells existed in the United States or what volume of waste was being injected into them, and that it did not possess complete records required to be collected under the Safe Drinking Water Act.


Oversight of injection wells is currently delegated by the EPA to a number of state agencies. Part of the problem, the GAO found, is that the EPA has not consistently inspected those state programs to ensure that state regulators comply with the Safe Drinking Water Act and EPA guidelines. The EPA also has failed to incorporate requirements it has placed on some of its state programs into federal regulations, making it difficult for the agency to take legal action against violators.


The EPA oversees more than 700,000 injection wells of various types in the United States, including about 172,000 that pump waste or other materials from the oil and gas industry underground. These wastes, often euphemistically referred to as "saltwater," commonly contain a mixture of water, hazardous chemicals and radioactive minerals. This subset of wells, called Class 2 wells, were the focus of the GAO report.


When waste material is injected thousands of feet underground, rock formations are supposed to prevent it from migrating into nearby drinking water sources. But this is not an exact science and regulators have been finding that fracturing natural rock formations and injecting liquids into them at high pressures can have real and troubling consequences. ProPublica's investigation found numerous instances in which waste had strayed from its target underground or spurted back to the surface, sometimes in residential areas.


Scientists interviewed by ProPublica said the wells were often located adjacent to fault lines which break the seal of rock layers, or old oil wells which also allow a pathway for contaminants to spread. The class 2 waste wells in question are not subject to the same rigorous geologic study, safety reviews, and regular monitoring that the EPA requires of other toxic waste injection wells from other industries, making it difficult for the EPA to enforce protections of underground drinking water supplies, ProPublica found.


According to the new GAO report, the EPA and state programs are also being hindered by budget constraints. Between 2003 and 2012, funding for state injection well programs stagnated at about $10 million a year, which — factoring in inflation — effectively meant resources had declined, the GAO concluded.


The report also blamed the EPA for not taking steps to collect complete, consistent and reliable data on injection wells to use for reporting at a national level, mirroring some of ProPublica's key findings.


"Unless EPA takes these steps, it will be several years before EPA can provide updated information at a national level to Congress, the public, and others on the [injection well] program, preventing them from understanding the program and the protection being provided to underground sources of drinking water at an important juncture in the development of oil and gas in the country," the GAO warned.


Read our coverage of injection wells to understand the risks involved in pumping waste underground and how regulators have been failing to police the oil and gas industry.


Senior reporter Abrahm Lustgarten contributed to this report.

Courtesy: ProPublica.org

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What caused the Malin tragedy was callousness of Netas and Babus

Hectic building and quarrying, illegally or by illegal permission, has resulted in the catastrophe at Malin, which may not be the last one

 

The killer wet landslide at Malin, which has literally flattened the once-alive village in a few minutes, on Thursday morning, continues to have at least 200 persons trapped under it, with bleak hope of survival. The village, about 110kms from Pune and tucked in the fragile ecological Bhima Shankar area and ensconced in the valley of the Sahyadri Hills, has been the victim of callousness of netas and babus.

 

The Pune administration continues to look the other way, despite experts and activists pointing out to hectic construction activity in the form of farm houses, roads, hotels, quarrying and other such activities, detrimental to environment. The Google imagery of this village (shown in this article) clearly shows digging/construction activity on the hill slopes under which lies Malin. Being only a few kilometres away from Bhima Shankar, renowned as one of the 12 important Jyotirlinga pilgrimages, road construction and hotel tourism activity is in full boom here, thus facilitating seepage of water into the bosom of the hills, and making the soil soft, that gradually leads to such a disaster.

 

 

More importantly, the village Malin has been spelt in bold letters in the list of those villages which are ecologically fragile and are needed to be urgently preserved and have no human interference as per a notification issued by the Ministry of Environment & Forests in 2013 under list of State-wise, District-wise and Taluk-wise villages in ESA (Ecologically Sensitive Area). It has been identified by the HL WG  (High Level committee of Western Ghats) at Annexure - A (copy of the notification here).

The notification states:  “And whereas, because of unprecedented threats to natural landscape of Western Ghats region by development projects and urban growth, the Working Group has recommended a non-tolerance policy with respect to highly interventionist and environmentally damaging activities like mining or polluting industries. HL WG has highlighted the need for urgent action for protection of biologically rich, diverse and natural landscape of Western Ghats;’’. The notification has ordered immediate halting of activity of mining, quarrying and sand mining; Thermal Power Plants ; building and construction projects of 20,000 sq. m. area and; township and area development projects with an area of 50 ha and above  and/or with built up area of 1,50,000 sq.m. and above. Malin along with a list of villages falls into this category. (see list in the notification order).

 


RTI activist Vijay Kumbhar is one of the several crusaders who have been questioning the Pune district administration on the senseless digging and construction on the hills and hill slopes in and around Pune. In a letter to the then Environment Minister Jairam Ramesh in 2011, Kumbhar had lamented that the Pune district collector is keeping information on illegal/ legal activity on hills and hill slopes a secret and not providing information under Section 4 of the RTI Act. He had pointed out that, “The vast number of illegal quarrying and excavation is going on in and around Pune, on large number of hills, mountains; and lands are being excavated without any necessary permission…In Wagholi near Pune around 10 to 12 kilometres area is being excavated for quarrying. Each quarry depth is around more than 100 metres. These quarries are visible from satellite also. Most of these quarries are running illegally.

“In Ghotawade near Paud, the Sahyadri hill is being excavated. Sahyadri hill (Malin is in the foot of the Sahyadri hill, my addition)  is the pride of India and is also a heritage site. Sahyadri belongs to history of Maharashtra and Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj…Katraj hill in Pune has already been destroyed.” While some information was provided, all of it is still not updated on the website.

In 2013, citizens were shocked when a young mother and her infant daughter, sitting in the car, were suddenly washed away by sudden floods at the Katraj ghat and died. The reason was a series of illegal constructions on top of the ghat. At that time, Kumbhar had demanded the revamping of eight anti-encroachment squads to halt illegal construction on hill tops and hill slopes all over Pune district. Such squads, 12 in number which were set up by Pune collectorate in 2011, after Kumbhar’s complaint, were withdrawn pointing out to lack of human resources. Although two lives were washed away, nothing has been done to book the culprits that are creating havoc with environment and lives of people.

The Maharashtra government has suddenly become active, as leaders of various political parties, including those from the centre, have been visiting Malin. However, this is just an attempt to be in the limelight, if one goes by the fact that the comprehensive Western Ecology Report by Madhav Gadgil is being pushed under the carpet. The Report has come out hard on hill cutting in the fragile Western Ghats, but it has been denounced by the government.  Here is the Moneylife article written after the earlier government refused to make the Western Ecology Report public.


The scary part is that Malin may be just one in the several tragedies that can potentially happen in the near future. Hope political leaders and bureaucrats who are visiting the Malin site, understand that the root cause of giving illegal permissions needs to be totally curbed and culprits allegedly responsible for this tragedy, be prosecuted.
 
(Vinita Deshmukh is consulting editor of Moneylife, an RTI activist and convener of the Pune Metro Jagruti Abhiyaan. She is the recipient of prestigious awards like the Statesman Award for Rural Reporting which she won twice in 1998 and 2005 and the Chameli Devi Jain award for outstanding media person for her investigation series on Dow Chemicals. She co-authored the book “To The Last Bullet - The Inspiring Story of A Braveheart - Ashok Kamte” with Vinita Kamte and is the author of “The Mighty Fall”.)

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COMMENTS

Mahesh S Bhatt

2 years ago

Sahara was the starter Lavasa is bigger than Sahara so get HCC Chairman in as Jairam Ramesh also questioend but money speaks

Politics ticks from Sharad Pawar to Soniaji.God also can't bless.Jairam legalizes Lavasa.Ram Ram Mahesh

Gopalakrishnan T V

2 years ago

This is the curse Indian masses suffer from. Our Netas and Babus do not learn any lesson and they never feel ashamed to hear such tragic news. Governance Standards are the worst in the Country and as long as they do not get fixed the masses will continue to suffer. Will the new Government be a role model to change the destiny of the people? One really feels sorry and helpless to read such news everyday in some part of the country and these accidents occur due to failure of the administration is the worst part.

REPLY

bharati

In Reply to Gopalakrishnan T V 2 years ago

Agreed and also believe that any democracy, no matter how weak, needs citizens for it to function.

India has too many people.

Make birth control a nationally important issue and the long term reason for such quarrying, deforesting and building will decrease.

Ordinary Indians defeated and threw out the might British empire. Surely they can stop greedy contractors and officials from acting against India's future wellbeing?

Jadhwani

In Reply to Gopalakrishnan T V 2 years ago

you are right as we have very poor laws and admin to catch and thrash the culprits and give them long prison terms, they are careless for the citizens problems and suffering due to their mistakes only ............. hope soon new govt takes note of this acts of ommission and commission and teach them good lessons to let them know they are on duty for citizens who work very hard to pay taxes , so they enjoy salaries and perks at some one elses costs ...............

Jadhwani

2 years ago

it is high time , catch the responsible admin and other officials and take them to court of law to punish them for the senseless loss of so many lives ........ else others in power will some where else , will to damage nature and thus kill more and more persons in india jai hind

REPLY

Vaibhav Dhoka

In Reply to Jadhwani 2 years ago

More sluggish is judicial system therefore culprits going to get punishment is remorse.

Jadhwani

In Reply to Vaibhav Dhoka 2 years ago

our weak systems have made culprits bold and they are total liability to our society now ...................

vns

2 years ago

The people should stop believing the system of Governance which is run by a nexus of Politicians-Middlemen-Capitalists who want to capture/ acquire everything on earth, not worrying about the Ecology, Environment and most important of all Animal and Plant Life only to make money. Resource exploitation and Development must have a limit. This limit can be fixed only by people by putting all possible obstructions to such encroachment of the resources needed for their survival.

REPLY

bharati

In Reply to vns 2 years ago

Who is living in all those new colonies in Pune? Many are second homes! Who drinks soft drinks like Coke which use any amount of water? Who uses plastic bottled water and bags which clog the environment and make India spend and spend on oil imports? Change your ways immediately if you care about NOT contributing to ecological damage. The second largest consumers of imported oil are cell phone towers.

Dayananda Kamath k

In Reply to vns 2 years ago

You have to add media also to this nexus because they have the capacity to change the preception of the people also. even this article a natural calamity has been linked to data. the description of the village in newpapers gives a situation of non approachability and a single bus in the morning which saved many alife who went to see offf their children. what the author has said may be happening and it should be curtailed. but everything should not be clubbed to earn browny points

Deepak Mahulkar

2 years ago

The list indicates many places other than Malin. While tragedy at Malin is irreversible, we can at least stop at other places. I am sure, author may have also knowledge about likely ecological damage in these area. Can we stop it by taking the matter to court and bring immediate halt to mining or other means engaged by human to destroy ecological balance?

ramesh

2 years ago

I would like to know from CM on whose land the village was built coz villagers were displaced from some other place Did Govt sell to pvt builder and rehabilitated?Name the Landowner /Builder /Tehasildar/Collector who gave OC ?I Know CM or CS no time to respond May be so called Opposition can demand and unravel the truth
CM BE Pro active -U are Engg and it does not require Rocket science -why tragedy Happend and whjo is responsible

Narendra Doshi

2 years ago

VERY WELL RESEARCHED & UNACTED FOR TOO LONG. A warning for avoiding / reducing such tragedies.

manhar kothari

2 years ago

It is unfortunate that innocent villagers lost their life.Government should take corrective action if this has happen due to human negligence.

AThiagarajan

2 years ago

Like the punishment meted out to the founder of the school in the fire of which so many children were dead in Tamilnadu, something equally severe should be given to those who have ignored so many warnings- accountability and punishment for inaction should be the norm not only for the aam admi/

Mukund Rajamannar

2 years ago

Wonderful analysis. The bigger question is who is listening? Accountability is missing in our country.

REPLY

ramesh

In Reply to Mukund Rajamannar 2 years ago

I am in agreement with you and also AThiagarjan-Most frustrating Criminals are set free and not even put in dock Poona Dvn Commissioner is one such glaring example .Does anyone from CM to PM ever have found time to read what people have to say.Committees after Committees and Reports never implementedCase in Point Mr Madhav Chitale-on irrigation scam

Pune Landslide: 10 dead, over 160 trapped in Malin village
There are reports that five persons were extricated alive from the massive debris of mud and rock, that covered the area at Malin village
 
At least 10 persons were killed and about 160 are feared trapped after large parts of a hillside collapsed on houses, amid heavy rain at Malin near Bhimashankar (Ambegaon taluka), in Pune district of Maharashtra.
 
There were reports that five persons were extricated alive from the massive debris of mud and rock that covered the area at Malin village, some 120 km from Pune. The village is near Dimbhe dam.
 
Chief Minister Prithviraj Chavan said five persons were killed in the landslide and 160 were still feared trapped. He said 44 houses on the hillside were swamped by the cascading debris, in the village with a population of about 715.
 
Rescue operations are on in full swing with the help of two teams from the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF), district collector Saurav Rao said.
 
According to Rao, the rescuers were moving slowly to avoid causing harm to the survivors. About 30 ambulances and fire brigade teams from adjoining areas have been rushed to the spot, he added.
 
Sandeep Rai Rathore, IG of NDRF, said his teams had difficulty reaching the scene of the landslide due to damage caused to the roads by heavy rains since the past few days. Quoting district authorities, he said, upto 200 people may be trapped.
 
The estimated 150-plus villagers were sleeping in their homes, and caught unawares causing them to get trapped under the mud, boulders and debris, and the army has been requested to help, said Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) legislator and Assembly Speaker Dilip Walse-Patil, in whose constituency the tragedy struck.
 
Chavan has left for the village with deputy CM Ajit Pawar to personally monitor rescue efforts. Hospitals in the vicinity have been put on alert and medical teams rushed to the spot.
 
Rescuers are facing a tough time due to constant rain. Large parts of Maharashtra have been witnessing heavy and incessant rains over the past few days.

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