Real Estate prices to go up in Mumbai as CM Fadnavis hikes ready reckoner rates

Laden with successive quarters of unsold inventory, a sluggish Mumbai property market will now become more expensive, with the Maharashtra government's latest rate hikes

 

Ready reckoner rates for localities across Mumbai have been hiked by the Fadnavis government, between 15% and 40%. 
 
Expensive localities like Worli and the commercial hub of Bandra Kurla Complex will bear the steepest hikes around 40%.
The average hikes though are around 17%. Developers have shown their displeasure against these hikes because the real estate market in Mumbai is already suffering very low turnover. 
 
The slow sales are exacerbated by the Reserve Bank of India's hawkish stance on rates, making borrowing expensive. The latest move will impact prices for various reasons.
The Ready reckoner rates are used as a benchmark to calculate stamp duty, registration, TDR, Fungible FSI etc. A steep hike, as we have just witnessed, will adversely affect sales because these costs make up a good chunk of the house cost.
 
However, the rates will only affect some costs and will in fact make the circle rates more in line with the market rates in most circles.
 
While developers are not pleased with the hike, even others have been surprised by the extent of the hike. The Maharashtra state budget has long been in deficit with massive borrowings. This move will have a subsidiary benefit of reducing the amount of black money involved in each transaction, once the RR rates come to parity with market rates.

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Can a child’s life be compensated?

Cases in the grey area between negligence and manslaughter need more attention

 

On a day when one reads about the humanity of the late Justice Krishna Iyer and then reads about man’s inhumanity to man, it upsets the mind. In the case we read, the victim was just a child; the pain compounded.

 

Harjol Ahuluwalia, a kid, had taken ill. He did not respond to the local doctor’s medicine while being treated in a Noida nursing home. The parents were advised to shift the child to a hospital. They did.

 

Harjol was suffering from typhoid; that is what the doctor said. Blood tests, cultured, can determine typhoid. The details are not reported but one has to take the doctor’s word as gospel. Harjol was duly admitted as an inpatient; an obvious sign of a serious condition.

 

Readers will recall how mix-ups occur in a hospital. In Harjol’s case, as presented to the National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission at Delhi, the child was advised certain medication. The nurse attending on the child gave a slip of paper to the boy’s parents and asked them to get the prescribed medicine. The name given for the drug was Lariago.

 

At this point, the case gets murkier. Lariago is an anti-malarial compound. Quinine-based, its generic formula is chloroquin or quinine hydrochloride. Quinine is the most effective medicine against malaria, especially the parasite plasmodium vivax. It is a mild drug, taken in pill form over days. In fact, it is used by some, in minute doses, as a prophylactic.

 

Nowhere is it prescribed as an anti-typhoid formulation.

 

In severe malaria cases, medication is injected for greater relief. It is, of course, to be administered with care and under constant supervision. Harjol was given a shot.

 

The boy immediately collapsed… in his mother’s arms. All hell broke loose. Experts were called in, including the paediatrician. Oxygen was supplied through a manual respirator. No improvement. The platelet count in the blood started to fall. More panic.

 

The hospital authorities gave up and suggested an immediate transfer to the intensive-care unit of a major hospital, automatic ventilators being available there. The child was shifted to the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).

 

A few days later, with no improvement in sight, other than the physical condition being stable, the boy was discharged. Unfortunately, he was in a vegetative state and the doctors at AIIMS said he would remain so permanently. The only son of his grieving parents, Harjol was condemned for life; his brain damaged.

 

The previous hospital offered to treat Harjol, but everyone must have realised that it was a lost battle. The attending nurse, who administered the injection, was not even qualified. The parents sued.

 

Now you be the judge.

 

All sympathy would be for the boy, naturally. But people do not give up so easily. The parents asked for Rs28 lakh, just to see the child through his life. The hospital baulked.

 

The insurance company said that it would not pay and, even if they had to, the maximum amount could be Rs12.5 lakh, the amount that the hospital was insured for.

 

Next was the excuse that the child was not a consumer; that the treatment was free.

 

Excuses galore. Finger pointing at its worst.

 

Litigation cannot end on a happy note. Why just medical negligence? This was equivalent to manslaughter. Homicide. Can monetary compensation ever come near the grief of the parents and the torture inflicted on the boy for life?

 

The Commission upheld the payment of Rs12.5 lakh as cover and another Rs5 lakh as additional relief. The question that begs an answer is: Was it worth fighting the poor folk for years, knowing fully well that they were bound to be compensated?

 

Surprisingly, no one ever asked why Lariago was administered in the first place.

 

Chloramphenicol was a drug of choice against typhus at one time! Now it is antibiotics.

 

Doctors are known for bad handwriting. Was this one such case?

 

(Bapoo Malcolm is a practising lawyer in Mumbai. Please email your comments to [email protected])

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COMMENTS

Bapoo Malcolm

2 years ago

M. Bhavesh,
You say you are a doctor. Of what, arts, literature, medicine, engineering, philosophy? Precision may be necessary.
You hit the nail on the head with your first comment. That there is a lot of malpractice. Then you again become antagonistic without verifying the facts. It happens. Many people, especially professionals, think they are the only literate folk. We plebeians receive flak.
Would a Jr. BSc, with Physics (Inter Science with Mathematics), a BA (Hons.) with Economics, Politics and specialization in English, Diplomas in Advertising, Public Relations, Journalism (with a gold medal in Journalism), followed by an LLB, do for you? Or should Radio and TV journalism be added for further satisfaction? Tutoring students for their Masters; could that be included? Should one add teaching law to II year Junior college students? Or writing on subjects as varied as Sports, Humour (the most difficult), predicting the Oil Crisis in !970, two years before the ‘Oil shokku’, comfort you? Maybe we can also add the failure of Sanjay Gandhi’s Maruti (not the face-saving Suzuki) being foretold in 1971. There may be more because this is the first time in 50 years that I have been put through this unedifying exercise.
Yes, a certificate course in Instrumentation too. And a patent in pipeline valves. Design of the world’s largest valve gearboxes (>1,700 kilograms). A mechanical eliminator of mosquitos (have had 10 attacks of malaria, including falciparum). To name a few from an “uneducated” journalist!
Since you do not know the details of the case, by your own admission, you may not be the best to comment on it. Maybe even unwise.
One more. An accredited National Commissar (official) by the UCI (Union Cyclists’ International), with the highest marks obtained worldwide at least until 1981. Maybe be my cursory knowledge of French helped. But then, it is one of six languages that I was forced to study. Can’t be perfect, can I?
The case did not involve a tragic death. Worse, vegetative state for life. Error proved. Fines, by way of insurance paid. QED. That is Latin for ‘Quad erat demonstrandum’.
‘Equivalent to manslaughter’ means almost. Valent is from valency and means of similar strength, not equal. Manslaughter is death, but without mens rea, which in Latin means guilty, or bad, mind. In other words a mistake or unintentional negligence. Otherwise it would be murder.
Isn’t the appointment of an untrained nurse a factor of guilt? You say that “all” medications have some serious side effects. Do the drug manufacturers agree with you? If so, all medicines must be banned forthwith.
Yes, I do know the difference between Typhoid and typhus. Was referring to the so-called wide spectrum antibiotics and their equally wide spread use.
There is another article where I have praised doctors for avoiding unnecessary tests. Lately newspapers have carried articles on contrary and money saving second opinions. My own advocate was victim of an unnecessary procedure; proved by his family doctor, but too late.
Thanks again for opening my eyes. Please keep reading and commenting. At least, I like dissent. It exerts everyone’s mind. Whether Doctor or uneducated journalist!

Bhavesh

2 years ago

Being a doctor i know that there are many cases of malpractice that go unpunished everyday. But then there is a bigger problem of barely educated people, who nowadays go by the name of journalist, writing their expert commentary on subjects that they don't have any idea about and start using words like manslaughter. Now i don't know the details of this case and it may or may not have involved a human error resulting in the tragic death of this child. Anti malarial medications are sometimes prescribed empirically because of high incidence of malaria in our country. And not only lariago, but all medications have some serious side effects which cannot be predicted before giving to patients. And from a person writing the article as an expert and using words like manslaughter etc, i expected him to understand the difference between typhoid and typhus atleast

Bhavesh

2 years ago

Being a doctor i know that there are many cases of malpractice that go unpunished everyday. But then there is a bigger problem of barely educated people, who nowadays go by the name of journalist, writing their expert commentary on subjects that they don't have any idea about and start using words like manslaughter. Now i don't know the details of this case and it may or may not have involved a human error resulting in the tragic death of this child. Anti malarial medications are sometimes prescribed empirically because of high incidence of malaria in our country. And not only lariago, but all medications have some serious side effects which cannot be predicted before giving to patients. And from a person writing the article as an expert and using words like manslaughter etc, i expected him to understand the difference between typhoid and typhus atleast

Turbulence in the air, airlines need to restructure flights

Only two out of all of India's airlines have been able to pay AAI dues on time. The airlines cannot survive with price wars and need to look at overhauling their flight plans and locations

 

With the continuing fall in international crude prices, the Oil companies have made a steep reduction in air turbine fuel (ATF) by 12.5%, reaching a cost of Rs52.4 per litre now. Flights to many cities in the north, particularly New Delhi, have been out of bounds due to intense fog and flights have been cancelled or delayed to ensure passenger safety.

 

It may be recalled that fuel pricing was deregulated way back in 2002 and this latest reduction is 6th in a series of cuts to make the operating cost of airlines a little lower than before. In fact, it is estimated, that fuel accounts for 40% to 50% of an airline's operating cost.

 

Though this is the lowest ATF rate in four years, airlines are not showing signs of reducing fares, because all of them have suffered prolonged cash crunches. Only Jet Airways and IndiGo have been able to meet their commitments, including the prompt payment of dues to Airport Authority of India.

 

To recap, Kingfisher is out of the running and down since 2012, SpiceJet has had to cancel flights due to "repossession" of the leased Boeing 737s for non-payment of rentals and some carriers have not been paying their airport dues on time.

 

In fact, the Airport Authority of India (AAI), who started the squeeze on SpiceJet, has now begun warning other airlines such as GoAir to bring their outstanding dues within Bank Guarantee levels. If not, they may be next in line to be put on "cash and carry" category. Such a move may not be applied on Air India, which owes Rs2,000 crore to AAI, all because they are a "government concern."

 

The only relaxation that was extended to SpiceJet, on government intervention, has been reported as "due to prospects of former promoter, Ajay Singh, showing interest to infuse some additional capital into the ailing airline.” As mentioned above, only Jet Airways and IndiGo have been paying AAI dues on time.

 

In order to ensure that passengers are not unduly taken for a ride by domestic carriers, the civil aviation ministry thought of fixing a fare cap of Rs20,000 for domestic sectors; for reasons unknown this has been kept in abeyance. But, in the meantime, airlines have increased the fares, as there is no guarantee that the crude oil prices will not fall further down or that, due to geo-political reasons go up north, all too suddenly.

 

Under these circumstances, it is in the interest of air travellers as well as domestic carriers that they restructure their flights in such a manner that each has a full occupancy and reduce the number of flights for same destinations in a given day so that they do not have too many empty seats to carry.

 

(AK Ramdas has worked with the Engineering Export Promotion Council of the ministry of commerce. He was also associated with various committees of the Council. His international career took him to places like Beirut, Kuwait and Dubai at a time when these were small trading outposts; and later to the US.)

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