Companies & Sectors
Ratan Tata invests in women wear's portal Kaaryah
In his latest personal investment, Ratan Tata, chairman emeritus of the Tata Group, has invested in Kaaryah, a technology enabled women's wear portal, its founder Nidhi Agarwal said on Wednesday.
 
"Yes, he (Tata) has invested in brand Kaaryah," said Agarwal, confirming Tata's latest venture capital move.
 
"We are very honoured to have him invest in his personal capacity. His investment is a great endorsement to our vision," she added.
 
However, Agarwal, who is also CEO of Kaaryah, did not reveal any financial details of Tata's newest investment.
 
Kaaryah offers western wear in 18 sizes and introduces 150 new designs and patterns every month.
 
The fashion portal launched in September 2013 focuses on offering Indian women the perfect fit for western formal wear.
 
Agarwal is an alumna of Kellogg Business School of North Western University, Chicago.
 
After retiring as the chairman of Tata Group in 2012, Ratan Tata has transformed into a prolific venture capital investor.
 
His other major investments went into Cardekho.com, Bluestone, Urban Ladder, Snapdeal, Xiaomi, Paytm and Altaeros Energies.

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COMMENTS

MOHAN

2 years ago

Ratan Tata invests in women wear ? Ratan Tata ??

Google apologises over Modi image search results
Internet giant Google on Wednesday apologised "for any confusion or misunderstanding" caused after Prime Minister Narendra Modi's images started appearing in image search results for query on "Top 10 criminals in India".
 
"These results trouble us and are not reflective of the opinions of Google. Sometimes, the way images are described on the internet can yield surprising results to specific queries. We apologise for any confusion or misunderstanding this has caused. We're continually working to improve our algorithms to prevent unexpected results like this," a Google spokesperson said in a statement.
 
Google said that results to the query "top 10 criminals in india" was due to a British daily which had an image of Modi and erroneous metadata.
 
It said that in this case, the image search results were drawn from multiple news articles with images of Modi, covering the prime minister's statements with regard to politicians with criminal backgrounds, but added that the news articles do not link Modi to criminal activity, and the words just appeared in close proximity to each other.

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Weeding Out Fairlife's 'Grass to Glass' Promise
One of the phrases behind Coke's new so-called supermilk may not mean what you think
 
Can Coke make milk attractive enough to convince consumers to pay nearly double the price of a regular carton and leave the competition cow-ering? 
 
That’s the bet the company is making with a new national ad campaign for Fairlife milk, a so-called supermilk that packs 50 percent more protein and 30 percent more calcium than “ordinary” milk (trademark: run-of-the-milk).
 
It’s Coke’s first foray into the milk market and an apparent appeal to the “real food” movement with advertising that touts Fairlife’s “simple ingredients” and carries the hashtag #BelieveInBetter.
 
But one TINA.org reader says the campaign also uses a potentially misleading feel-good phrase to push the milk, which first hit store shelves earlier this year.
 
“On the packaging it says ‘grass to glass,’ implying the milk comes from grass fed cows,” the reader wrote in an email. “It does not.”
 
The complete phrase as it appears on the back of the container reads: “We promise: … From grass to glass traceability back to our own farms.” The Fairlife website also takes up the narrative, stating: “We believe in doing better every step of the way, from grass to glass, because it’s the right thing to do.”
 
Reader is right
 
Rhetorical statements aside, the truth is that the reader is right: Fairlife milk is not derived from grass-fed cows.
 
TINA.org sought comment from Coke but our requests were not returned. But a Fairlife customer representative confirmed in a phone interview that the cows are not fed grass but a diet of soy, corn, alfalfa and grains.
So then, what’s grass got to do with it?
 
The customer representative, who declined to give her full name, only echoed the words on the container, saying that the phrase “from grass to glass” “represents the traceability of the product.” She said it’s a way “to prove the history of the animals and the location of the farm” from which the milk originated.
 
Regardless of how you interpret the phrase, one thing’s for sure: It’s a memorable marketing device for a new product looking to make a splash a la cookies in milk. Just make sure to do some research on Fairlife — including its health claims — before you dunk.
 
Find more of TINA’s coverage on milk here
 

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