Citizens' Issues
Rajnath stuck in lift, pulled out through roof

The incident took place at the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) headquarters in south Delhi's Vasant Kunj where the home minister had gone to celebrate "Shaurya Diwas"

 
Home Minister Rajnath Singh and his deputy Kiren Rijiju got stuck inside a lift at the CRPF headquarters here and had to be hoisted out through its roof, an official said.
 
The incident took place at the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) headquarters in south Delhi's Vasant Kunj where the home minister had gone to celebrate "Shaurya Diwas".
 
Minister of State for Home Kiren Rijiju and CRPF Director General Prakash Mishra were also stuck along with him.
 
"The lift got stuck due to a technical fault. It's a single-storey building. We managed to take the ministers and our chief out from the lift within a few minutes. They were hoisted up through the roof," said a CRPF official.
 
He said that they pressed the alarm when the lift refused to budge.
 
The official said that the home minister was the last to be hauled up through the roof, after the CRPF chief and Rijiju.
 

 

User

Farmers groups move SC against land ordinance
A group of farmers' organisations moved the Supreme Court on Thursday seeking the re-promulgated land ordinance to be quashed on the grounds of its being ultra vires of the Constitution and devoid of constitutional morality. They sought the government be restrained from enforcing it.
 
The Bharatiya Kishan Union, Delhi Grameen Samaj, Gram Sewa Samiti and Chogama Vikas Avam said, "The Right to Fair Compensation and Transparency in Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement (Amendment) Ordinance, 2015, is unconstitutional, null and void and ultra vires Articles 14 and 123 of the Constitution of India and hence void ab initio".
 
Describing it as a "colourful exercise of power" by the government, the petitioner organisations also sought the apex court's direction to the government restraining it from "acting upon" the ordinance.
 
Describing the re-promulgation of the ordinance "as arbitrary as violative of Article 14 of the constitution", the farmers organisations said it was a "fraud on the Constitution itself".
 
Pointing at holes in the re-promulgation of the land ordinance, the petitioner organisations said that "deliberately proroguing" the Rajya Sabha on March 28, 2015, "whilst it was in budget session only for the oblique and malafide purpose of re-promulgating the impugned Ordinance goes against the very spirit and raison de'etre underlying Article 123 of the Constitution".
 
The petitioners contended that the action of the government in re-promulgating the ordinance was malafide and thus open to challenge.
 
Asserting that the government has "abandoned all principles of Constitutional morality" by re-promulgating the ordinances, the petition settled by counsel Indira Jaising said "adherence to the principles of constitutional morality by the different organs of government is as much a mandate to be enforced strictly like the letter of the written Constitution".
 
The discretionary power of the president to promulgate ordinances has to be "exercised judiciously and with in the strict paradigm of the circumstances, circumscribing the exercise of such discretion under Article 123", the organisations said.
 
The law-making function under the Constitution was vested in parliament, the petitioner organisations contended.
 
They said, "If the executive was permitted to continue the provisions of an ordinance by issuing successive ordinances without submitting the same to the voice of parliament, it is nothing but usurpation by the executive of the law making powers of the legislature".
 
"Merely because it does not have numbers in the Rajya Sabha, the executive cannot be permitted to continue the law making exercise by way of an ordinance" and "the life and liberty of citizens cannot be regulated by ordinances..."
 
The government "deliberately" did not move the 2015 bill for discussion in the Rajya Sabha after its passage in the Lok Sabha between March 10 and 20, "due to lack of its numbers, political will or consensus".
 
"The ordinance making power under Article 123 was never meant to be a substitute to overcome lack of numbers of the executive in one house," the organisations contended.
 
"Neither the letter of the Article nor the relevant Constituent Assembly Debates indicate that the device of Article 123 could be resorted to by the executive to make laws to overcome its difficulty in passing the legislation in one house due to lack of majority/political will or consensus", the petitioners said.
 
The government was "evolving a dangerous precedent for the exercise of Article 123 which is not at all envisaged by the Constitution".
 
The petitioners said the "issuance of the impugned ordinance goes against the very purpose, intent and spirit underlying under Article 123".

User

COMMENTS

vishal

2 years ago

It is not clear why the opposition is gearing up farmers against the Government in the land acquisition bill with out studying the pros and cons. The farmers who may sell their lands to corporate should be rich and be in a position to offer large swathe of lands. This will not be the case in case of small and medium farmers. The corporates will not come forward to get small piece of lands. It is clear some rich agriculturists with vast acres of lands are trying to save their ill gotten properties under this cover of protecting small and marginal farmers. Hope the Apex Court will see through this political game.

E-retailers spending big bucks on advertising, while customer service takes a backseat
E-retailers, flush with private equity money have large advertising budgets that are liberally spread across mainstream media. Is this allowing them to generate only positive news while poor service, delivery hiccups as well as the strange antics of some young founders are quietly buried? 
 
It is boom-time for e-commerce start-ups in India, which are flush with venture capital funding that allows for large advertising budgets for brand building. These days, a clear corollary to large ad-spends is the ability to influence editorial coverage and ensure that it is restricted to positive coverage and puff pieces.  All have learning glitches and delivery problems, even if they are teething troubles and are rarely reported.
 
Consider just one such example. On 6th April, a leading economic newspaper reported how India's largest online grocer BigBasket was set to offer home delivery in 60 minutes. It reported that BigBasket was planning to tie up with local stores to manage its logistics. The report talked about how BigBasket will collaborate with 1,800 local stores in Bangalore, Hyderabad, Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Pune, and how it will provide them the technology to handle deliveries and manage inventories. The report was clearly to counter a move by Flipkart and Amazon's (which has announced “Kirana Now”) to move into its domain by offering groceries and household products. 
 
Interestingly, during the very time that this report was published, BigBasket was in fact struggling to manage deliveries, inventories and the large orders that were ostensibly triggered by its “offer” on fruits and vegetables. There were mistakes galore leading to incomplete delivery, damaged products and poor follow up and rectification or orders. This was happening for orders that had been placed as much as two days in advance as well. Clearly, the online grocer is a long way off from being able to deliver in 60 minutes, leave alone deliver a complete order based on correct updation of stocks and inventories on its website. 
 
In fact, the problem was widespread enough for BigBasket to send out an apology email to customers, much like Flipkart had to do after its “BigBillion Day” chaos in October last year. 
 
The email, sent out by KB Nagaraju, Chief Customer Experience Officer on 7th April acknowledges that customers have had to put up with “delayed deliveries, incorrect deliveries, or difficulty in getting delivery slots of your choice.” It also acknowledges that customers were unable to get in touch with their customer service office. 
 
It goes on to list measures that are planned to avoid such issues in future, such as increased buffers in supply chain capacity, supply chain monitoring and prompt alerts to customers in case of any constraints from their end. 
 
The audacity of being able to plug a story about 60 minute delivery at a time of a delivery crisis is an indicator of how all news that is fit to be published is decided by those who have the bucks to pay for large advertising campaigns.
 
It is not just BigBasket – customers have been complaining of problems with delivery in almost all e-commerce platforms. On the Indian Consumer Complaints Forum, many consumers have reported delayed deliveries, delivery of wrong items and rude behaviour of delivery boys. Many reported that while the online delivery tracker says “Out for Delivery” or “Item Delivered”, the products were in fact not delivered at all. 
 
Customers face these issues across all e-commerce companies, including biggies like Snapdeal, Flipkart and Amazon. In addition, while customers are struggling to have their problems addressed, e-commerce companies have been spending big money on advertising and ‘positive news’. 
 
According to media reports, the e-commerce sector spent between Rs750 crore and Rs800 crore on advertising in 2014, and this number could cross Rs1,000 crore in 2015.
 
An apologetic email or a few catchy jingles may appease customers for a few weeks, but e-tail companies such as BigBasket should perhaps, be working on getting their deliveries and customer service right before focusing on media strategies and delivery on short-notice. 
 
Our email sent to BigBasket about the delivery issues remained unanswered till writing the story. We will incorporate their views as and when we receive it. 

User

COMMENTS

mulkit salia

2 years ago

just had the pathetic flipkart expierience this week

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)