Citizens' Issues
Parcel reaches destination after 40 years in Australia

The battered parcel was delivered to a Melbourne tennis club after it was first ordered in the mid-1970s, a media report said on Friday

 

A parcel in Australia took 40 years to reach its destination.
 
The battered parcel was delivered to a Melbourne tennis club after it was first ordered in the mid-1970s, a media report said on Friday.
 
The parcel, containing sew-on patches of the club's crest, is believed to have fallen behind machinery in a sorting centre at Australia Post -- the state-owned mail service -- only to be discovered recently when the company moved to another facility, reported Xinhua citing News Corp.
 
Former committee member of the tennis club Irene Garrett, who the package was addressed to, said she "had a good laugh" when the item finally arrived.
 
"I couldn't believe it, I'd forgotten all about. We're guessing it must have been around 1975, and I must have ordered it," Garrett was quoted as saying on Friday. "I'm guessing I ordered it because it was addressed to me."
 
The name and address on the envelope remained legible four decades on, according to Garett.
 
Garrett, who is no longer associated with the tennis club, thanked Australia Post workers for its better-late-than-never attitude.
 
"It's allowed us to get back in touch with past members of our club and we've heard some fantastic stories about what used to happen in the early days," Garrett said.
 
"(The parcel) could have just been thrown in the bin but it's great that people are so honest to say we found something and to deliver it." 
 

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Garibi Hatao has remained mere political slogan: Modi

The BJP-led central government was committed to making basic changes in government schemes so that the poor were actually benefited, the prime minister said in his address after distributing e-rickshaws to the poor

 

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Friday said that 'Garibi Hatao' (remove poverty) had sadly remained a mere slogan for the past many decades and that efforts for a turnaround in the lives of the poor had failed to bear fruit.
 
"Chunav ke dauran gareebi ki maala japte rehna ek aam baat hai (it is normal to speak of poverty during poll campaigning)," he said while addressing a gathering of rickshaw pullers in his Varanasi parliamentary constituency. 
 
The BJP-led central government was committed to making basic changes in government schemes so that the poor were actually benefited, the prime minister said in his address after distributing e-rickshaws to the poor.
 
"We have initiated many things, including skill development, which will enable the poor to begin their lives afresh and in a much better, financially sustainable manner," the prime minister said. 
 
He said he however did not wish to blame any previous government or political party for the pitiable condition of the poor in the country.
 
'Garibi Hatao' slogan was coined in the early 70s by the then prime minister Indira Gandhi and the Congress. 
 
Modi, a first-time Lok Sabha MP from the temple town, also urged the people to send their children to school as "education was a great weapon in fighting poverty."
 
He also pointed out how the Jan Dhan scheme launched by the NDA government had benefited the poor and almost 18 crore accounts had been opened. 
 
Earlier, the prime minister was received by Uttar Pradesh Governor Ram Naik, state cabinet minister Balram Yadav and district officials.

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Facebook launches first newsgathering tool for journalists

Called Signal, the free tool will help journalists track relevant trends, photos, videos, and posts from nearly 1.5 billion Facebook users and Instagram's 300 million users for storytelling and reporting

 

In a move to take on the micro-blogging site Twitter which is the biggest source of breaking news for journalists, Facebook has launched an innovative newsgathering tool that will help reporters scan and file stories from the ocean of information on Facebook and its photo-sharing site Instagram.
 
Called Signal, the free tool will help journalists track relevant trends, photos, videos, and posts from nearly 1.5 billion Facebook users and Instagram's 300 million users for storytelling and reporting.
 
“We have heard from journalists that they want an easy way to make Facebook a more vital part of their newsgathering,” posted Andy Mitchell, director of media partnerships, on Facebook website.
 
“We are excited to introduce Signal, for Facebook and Instagram, a free discovery and curation tool for journalists who want to source, gather, and embed newsworthy content from Facebook and Instagram, across news, culture, entertainment, sports, and more - all in one place,” he wrote.
 
With this tool, journalists interested in seeing what conversations are resonating on Facebook can monitor which topics are trending and then quickly display related content that has been shared publicly from both people and Pages for deeper context on those trends.
 
“Search functionality makes it easy to surface content directly related to a story or topic they are tracking,” Mitchell added.
 
Journalists can access lists of public figures ranked by who is being mentioned the most on Facebook, including real-time conversations across politicians, authors, actors, musicians, sports teams, players and more.
 
“Using location-tag and topic-related search functionality, journalists can search Instagram for public posts related to specific hashtags, associated with specific public accounts, or tagged with locations using an interactive global map,” he further posted.
 
Every Facebook post, every Instagram image or video, and every metric found in Signal can be easily saved into custom collections for later use in a downstream CMS for digital writers or for integration with broadcast graphics packages for broadcast teams, the Facebook post revealed.
 
Journalists can easily embed any Facebook and Instagram post in their coverage by simply selecting and copying the post’s embed code.
 
Newsrooms can integrate Signal APIs to feed curated content onto their websites and into their broadcasts, as well as produce native visualisations of curated Instagram content for events.
 
“This is a first step in helping journalists use Facebook and Instagram more effectively and we will gather feedback and iterate to make Signal as useful as possible for industry professionals,” Mitchell pointed out.
 

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