Overhaul of Congress leadership - an idea whose time has come

Time is running out fast for the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty, which has been at the helm of the Congress for most of the last seven decades or so. Congress is on the verge of a collapse, and this time there is no saviour


What has become of our great organisation? Instead of a party that fired the imagination of the masses throughout the length and breadth of India, we have shrunk, losing touch with the toiling millions, said Rajiv Gandhi while addressing the Congress centenary session in Bombay (now Mumbai) on December 28, 1985.

History seems to be, like always, repeating itself. The "great organisation" India's prime minister was referring to needs an urgent leadership change to stem the rot. As one of the staunch Nehru-Gandhi family loyalists, M.L. Fotedar, has recently stated, the Congress is on the verge of a collapse. "However, this time there is no saviour," writes the former union minister and serving Congress Working Committee member in his soon to be released book, "The Chinar Leaves".

If one is to ask a devoted Congress worker, the scenario is really bleak. A political party which was guided by intellectual giants like Mahatma Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru, and which has ruled India for around 50 years in the last seven decades or so, has been reduced to the ignominy of occupying just a handful of the opposition benches.

Time is running out fast for the dynasty which has been at the helm of the Indian National Congress for most of the last seven decades or so. With the electoral fortunes of the Congress hitting its nadir last May - winning just 44 of the Lok sabha's 543 elected seats - the delinking of the historic political organisation from the Nehru-Gandhi family is a historic necessity which the Congress leadership can ignore only at its peril.

Sonia Gandhi is rightly credited for her role in saving the oldest Indian political party from oblivion in 1998, but she is well beyond her prime. The Congress president needs to be shown the script of her inaugural speech on April 6, 1998.

"I have come to this office at a critical point in the history of the party. Our numbers in parliament have dwindled. Our support base among the electorate has been seriously eroded. Some segments, including Dalits and minorities, have drifted from us..."We are in danger of losing our central place in the polity of our country as a central party of governance," Sonia Gandhi had said.

Gandhi is credited with devising plans to revitalise the party by "reinforcing the role of ordinary workers and creating a representative and responsible organisational structure of the party" in 1998. But, in 2015, Rajiv Gandhi's widow can be accused of "losing touch with the toiling millions".

To make the scenario even more depressing for a brooding Congress worker, the only alternative being presented by an organisation in denial is Rahul Gandhi. It would be naïve to expect Rahul Gandhi of upping his leadership ante and provide effective leadership to one of the largest political organisations in the world.

It would be unkind to expect a "reluctant politician" to lead the second most populous country on the planet. It would be also unreasonable if that reluctant politician happens to be Rahul Gandhi - the same person who is accused of copying a simple condolence message to the victims of the Nepal earthquake from his mobile.

Why are Congress leaders so reluctant to look beyond Sonia Gandhi and Rahul Gandhi? How can one justify such a bankruptcy of leadership from a party which still has some credible intellectuals in its ranks? The 2014 parliamentary election results provided a wonderful opportunity to push for a leadership change but it has been wasted by those for whom the Congress starts and finishes with: Nehru-Gandhi family.

"The dilemma before Sonia Gandhi was that on the one hand she could not do without her coterie while on the other hand she had an overriding desire to see her son succeed in politics," Fotedar writes in his book.

Justifying the Pavlovian conditioning the Congress leadership is often accused of, Sonia Gandhi - and the unofficial heir-apparent Rahul Gandhi - have been completely absolved of the responsibility of bringing the Congress to such a pathetic status.

To again quote from Rajiv Gandhi's above-mentioned Bombay speech: The revitalisation of our organisation is a historical necessity.

The voices of those refusing to "go gentle into that good night" are beginning to be heard. "History is threatening to repeat itself. It is a matter of time before Soniaji's and Rahul's leadership is challenged from within the party. I will be observing closely how they stand up to this looming challenge, because Sonia is not Indira and Rahul is not Sanjay," Fotedar says.

It would be interesting to see who would challenge the mother-son duo and how many CWC stalwarts would stand behind the challenger. It would also be interesting to see whether the Congress would decide to go for the makeover at the top or disappear into the annals of history.

(Rekha Bhattacharjee is a veteran Indian journalist and commentator resident in Sydney. The views expressed are personal. She can be contacted at [email protected])


Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.



Anand Vaidya

10 months ago

Certainly, we the citizens, will not miss Congress Party's demise. Oh, actually, it will be a good thing for India.

Anyway Congress has already spawned many illicit heirs (AAP etc), so no worries.


10 months ago

illiterates r the one who can do as in past "However, this time there is no Savior,"

Bapoo Malcolm

10 months ago

The Congress party is a cardboard box. A flat piece held together by glue. The glue is the Gandhis. The box is filled with the motley (and the not so motley) who are afraid to see the glue come unstuck. Rahul should announce his disinterest in high legislative posts, a la Sonia. Then stay away from day to day running of the government, if re-elected.

Let the glue become stronger. But it cannot move into the box. Or else all will come apart.

Celebrities’ Medical Records Tempt Hospital Workers to Snoop

Snooping on celebrities has been a bane for health systems around the country for years. Here's a partial list of high-profile breaches and the consequences that accompanied them


Snooping on celebrities has been a bane for health systems around the country for years. The proliferation of electronic medical records systems has made it easier to track and punish those who peek in records they have no legitimate reason to access.


Below is a partial list of high-profile breaches and the consequences that accompanied them, compiled from news reports.


Related story: Small-Scale Violations of Medical Privacy Often Cause the Most Harm


George Clooney

October 2007: Palisades Medical Center in New Jersey suspended 27 workers without pay for a month for looking at the medical records of actor George Clooney, who had been treated there the prior month after a motorcycle accident.


Britney Spears

March 2008: UCLA Medical Center took steps to fire at least 13 employees and suspended at least six others for snooping in the medical records of pop star Britney Spears during her hospitalization in its psychiatric unit. In addition, six physicians faced discipline.





Richard Collier

November 2008: Jacksonville Medical Center in Florida fired 20 workers for looking at the records of Richard Collier, then an offensive tackle for the Jacksonville Jaguars, who was paralyzed in a shooting.










Nadya Suleman, who gave birth to octuplets

March 2009: Kaiser Permanente revealed that 21 employees and two doctors inappropriately accessed the medical records of Nadya Suleman, who gave birth to octuplets at its Bellflower, California, hospital. Of those workers, 15 were either terminated or resigned under pressure and eight faced other disciplinary actions. In May 2009, the California Department of Public Health fined the hospital $250,000 for failing to protect Suleman's records.


TV anchorwoman Anne Pressly

October 2009: An Arkansas doctor and two former workers at St. Vincent Medical Center were sentenced to probation and fined after pleading guilty to federal misdemeanor charges that they illegally accessed the records of a Little Rock television news anchorwoman who died in 2008 after being attacked at her home during a robbery.


Michael Jackson

June 2010: Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center was fined $95,000 by the California Department of Public Health for failing to stop employees from accessing singer Michael Jackson's records. Two hospital workers and two contract employees were terminated.







Gabrielle Giffords

January 2011: University Medical Center in Tucson fired three employees for snooping in records after the shooting that left then-U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in critical condition. A contract nurse also was terminated.


Unnamed celebrity patients

July 2011: UCLA Health System agreed to pay $865,000 to the federal government to resolve allegations that its employees violated federal patient privacy laws by snooping in the medical records of two celebrity patients. Separately, in January 2010, a former UCLA employee pleaded guilty to four counts of illegally reading medical records, mostly from celebrities and other high-profile patients, and was sentenced to four months in federal prison.


A patient fatally shot in a hospital ICU

October 2012: Akron General Medical Center in Ohio fired a "small number of employees" for looking at the medical records of a woman whose husband fatally shot her in the hospital's intensive-care unit.


Kim Kardashian

July 2013: Five workers and a student research assistant were fired for inappropriately accessing records at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. One of those was reportedly reality TV star Kim Kardashian, who gave birth to her daughter at the hospital the prior month.


A U.S. missionary doctor with Ebola

September 2014: Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha fired two workers for looking in the records of Dr. Rick Sacra, who had been treated at the hospital for the Ebola virus he contracted while volunteering in Africa.


The mother of a 5-year-old who died

August 2015: Carilion Clinic in Roanoke, Virginia, fired or disciplined 14 workers for peeking at a patient's medical records in a high-profile case. The patient was reportedly the mother of a five-year-old boy who was found dead in a septic tank near his home.


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