Stocks
Omkar Speciality Chemicals : Trying Hard
There is a lot of interest in Indian speciality chemicals companies. The assumption is that...
Premium Content
Monthly Digital Access

Subscribe

Already A Subscriber?
Login
Yearly Digital+Print Access

Subscribe

Moneylife Magazine Subscriber or MSSN member?
Login

Yearly Subscriber Login

Enter the mail id that you want to use & click on Go. We will send you a link to your email for verficiation
Headwinds Continue
Last fortnight, I had suggested that the Sensex probably would move around 26,000, unless...
Premium Content
Monthly Digital Access

Subscribe

Already A Subscriber?
Login
Yearly Digital+Print Access

Subscribe

Moneylife Magazine Subscriber or MSSN member?
Login

Yearly Subscriber Login

Enter the mail id that you want to use & click on Go. We will send you a link to your email for verficiation
India successfully tests home-grown mini-shuttle
India on Monday successfully tested home-grown winged reusable launch vehicle (RLV) as a mini-shuttle and demonstrated its space technology prowess, a senior official said.
 
"We have successfully accomplished the RLV mission as a technology demonstrator. The lift-off was at 7.00 a.m. from the first launch pad here," Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) director Devi Prasad Karnik told IANS.
 
The mini-shuttle returned and plunged into the Bay of Bengal, about 500 km away from the coast, after a 10-minute flight at about 70 km above the Earth.
 
The 1.7-tonne RLV was launched from the spaceport here in Andhra Pradesh, about 80 km of Chennai on the east coast.
 
The mission has qualified India to enter the elite club of space-faring nations like the US, Russia and Japan, which developed and used RLVs for their space missions over the years.
 
A seven-metre rocket with a booster, weighing 17 tonnes, including nine tonnes of solid propellants (fuel) with the aircraft-shaped RLV was used as a flying test bed to evaluate technologies the space agency developed to reduce the cost of launching satellites into the Earth's polar and geo-stationary orbits.
 
The mission has enabled ISRO to collect data on hypersonic speed, autonomous landing and powered cruise flight using air-breathing propulsion.
 
"The long-term objective of this mission is to reduce the launch cost by 80 percent of the present cost by using a reusable vehicle," Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) director K. Sivan told IANS ahead of the test.
 
Space agencies spend on average $20,000 per kg to build and use medium-to-heavy weight rockets to launch satellites into the Earth's orbits.
 
The space agency's telemetry, tracking and command network (Istrac) in Bangalore will collect the data from the vehicle.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

 

User

We are listening!

Solve the equation and enter in the Captcha field.
  Loading...
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email
Close

To continue


Please
Sign Up or Sign In
with

Email

BUY NOW

The Scam
24 Year Of The Scam: The Perennial Bestseller, reads like a Thriller!
Moneylife Magazine
Fiercely independent and pro-consumer information on personal finance
Stockletters in 3 Flavours
Outstanding research that beats mutual funds year after year
MAS: Complete Online Financial Advisory
(Includes Moneylife Magazine and Lion Stockletter)