Citizens' Issues
Odd-even not a solution to Delhi pollution, says AIIMS doctor
New Delhi : The problem of air pollution cannot be tackled by the odd-even formula alone, but the government should also subsidize electric cars which do not pollute the air, said a senior AIIMS doctor.
 
"By implementing the odd-even strategy, only the number of cars can be brought down to some extent, but air pollution and toxicity cannot be brought down at any cost," said Randeep Guleria, head of respiratory medicine at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS).
 
Speaking at an event ahead of World Asthma Day, Guleria said the odd-even policy won't work in the long run and instead the government should come up with a multi-pronged strategy to deal with the problem.
 
"We need to subsidize electric cars and two wheelers. They are environment friendly. We have to be realistic," he said.
 
Guleria, who is among the world's top pulmonary medicine specialists, also said there was need to improve the quality of cars and fuel. 
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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Longer sitting hours ups heart attack risk
New York : Spending too much time sitting is bad for your heart as researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have found that sedentary behaviour is associated with increased amounts of calcium deposits in the heart's arteries, which in turn is linked to a higher risk of heart attack.
 
"This is one of the first studies to show that sitting time is associated with early markers of atherosclerosis buildup in the heart," said senior study author Amit Khera, associate professor at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Centre. 
 
"Each additional hour of daily sedentary time is associated with a 12 percent higher likelihood of coronary artery calcification," Khera noted.
 
In the study published in the Journal of American College of Cardiology, the researchers concluded that reducing daily "sitting time" by even one to two hours per day could have a significant and positive impact on future cardiovascular health.
 
For many individuals with a desk job that requires them to sit for large portions of the day, they suggested taking frequent breaks.
 
In this study, the researchers asked some 2,000 participants to wear a device that measured their activity levels for a week. 
 
Participants spent an average of 5.1 hours sitting per day and an average of 29 minutes in moderate to vigorous physical activity each day.
 
"We observed a significant association between increased sedentary time and coronary artery calcium," Khera said.
 
"These associations were independent of exercise, traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors such as diabetes and high blood pressure, and socioeconomic factors,” Khera noted.
 
This research suggests that increased subclinical atherosclerosis characterized by calcium deposition is one of the mechanisms through which sedentary behavior increases cardiovascular risk and that this risk is distinct from the protective power of exercise," he explained.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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One minute of intense exercise can keep you in shape
Toronto : You may now have no excuse not to exercise as researchers have found that a single minute of very intense exercise produces health benefits similar to 45 minutes of traditional endurance training.
 
The findings put to rest the common excuse for not getting in shape -- there is not enough time.
 
"This is a very time-efficient workout strategy," said lead author on the study Martin Gibala, professor of kinesiology at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. 
 
"Brief bursts of intense exercise are remarkably effective," Gibala said.
 
The scientists set out to determine how sprint interval training (SIT) compared to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), as recommended in public health guidelines. 
 
They examined key health indicators including cardiorespiratory fitness and insulin sensitivity, a measure of how the body regulates blood sugar.
 
A total of 27 sedentary men were recruited and assigned to perform three weekly sessions of either intense or moderate training for 12 weeks, or to a control group that did not exercise.
 
The SIT protocol involved three 20-second 'all-out' cycle sprints and was found effective for boosting fitness. 
 
The workout totalled just 10 minutes, including a two-minute warm-up and three-minute cool down, and two minutes of easy cycling for recovery between the hard sprints.
 
The new study compared the SIT protocol with a group who performed 45 minutes of continuous cycling at a moderate pace, plus the same warm-up and cool down. 
 
After 12 weeks of training, the results were remarkably similar, showed the findings published online in the journal PLOS ONE.
 
"Most people cite 'lack of time' as the main reason for not being active," Gibala said.
 
"Our study shows that an interval-based approach can be more efficient -- you can get health and fitness benefits comparable to the traditional approach, in less time," Gibala said.
 
Disclaimer: Information, facts or opinions expressed in this news article are presented as sourced from IANS and do not reflect views of Moneylife and hence Moneylife is not responsible or liable for the same. As a source and news provider, IANS is responsible for accuracy, completeness, suitability and validity of any information in this article.

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